The Briefly for September 23, 2019 – The “A Failed Presidential Candidate” Edition

Another cyclist was killed by a driver, this week’s late-night subway disruptions, five major problems waiting for the mayor, the best dive bars and more in today’s daily NYC news update

This week’s late-night subway disruptions are bringing the pain. Make sure to check before you stay out late. (Subway Weekender)

The mayor is no longer a failing presidential candidate, he’s a failed presidential candidate. RIP the de Blasio Campaign 2019 – 2019. (Politico)

Now that the mayor decided to do his job full-time again, here are five major problems waiting for him. (NY Times)

The 21st bicyclist to be killed by a driver on New York’s streets is 14-year-old Mario Valenzuela. Mario was killed by a 33-year-old man who was driving a private sanitation truck making a right turn on Borden Avenue in Queens. (LIC Post)

Shore Parkway is getting a protected bike lane, despite Community Board 11’s protests. Amid a record year for cyclists killed by drivers, neighborhoods who push back against lanes using thinly-veiled excuses are making a clear decision between the lives of their neighbors and the desire to drive a car however they please. (The City)

Are you ready for the MTA to upgrade its signals? Are you ready for extensive disruptions while it does so? We’re talking line shut down on nights and weekends on the 4/5/6, N/W, A/C, G, E, and F lines. There’s always the bus… (amNY)

Here are the first 48 subway stations getting accessibility upgrades as outlined in the 2020 – 2024 capital plan. (Streetsblog)

The Park Slope Food Coop received more media coverage than it deserves, but this story about how the super liberals of the Park Slope Food Coop have fought against unionization of its full-time workers is an eye-opener. (NY Times)

A sneak peek inside the new library in Hunters Point. (Untapped Cities)

Five Gowanus sites are being considered for landmark status this week as preservationists are pushing to protect as much of the neighborhood as possible ahead of a possible rezoning. (Brownstoner)

In the battle between Industry City and City Councilmember Carlow Menchaca over plans for the site’s future, Industry City blinked and will delay their plans for expansion after acquiescing to Menchaca’s concerns. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Whoever is the monster that stole this child’s saxophone, you need to return it. (Gothamist)

One of the hottest 2020 elections in New York will be the retiring Rep. José Serrano’s congressional seat in the South Bronx. (Politico)

Holtermann’s Bakery, in business for over 150 years in Staten Island, gets the Atlas Obscura nod for its timeless desserts, calling out its “real deal” Charlotte Russe. (Atlas Obscura)

Uber is suing the city for its cap on the company’s growth and a law passed in August which restricts the amount of time a driver can drive in Manhattan without a fare, calling the laws “arbitrary and capricious.” (Politico)

Congratulations to Uma Smith of Bed-Stuy, who won a James Dyson award for her invention Cocoon, a pillow that can be placed under someone’s head during a seizure that also contacts bystanders on how they can help. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

If you’ve ridden the Long Island Rail Road this month, there’s a chance you’ve been exposed to the measles. (Gothamist)

What to eat and do in Greenpoint. (amNY)

Here are the restaurants the Department of Health shut down this week for violations, including Hook’d on the Hudson, leading the pack with a jaw-dropping 141 points. (Patch)

The best gluten-free pizza on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The Village Halloween parade is returning this year with the theme “Wild Thing!” Let’s try harder with the costume creativity this year, shall we? (Brooklyn Vegan)

An apartment with a pool? Tired. An apartment with an indoor wave pool? Wired! (Viewing NYC)

The Times goes behind the scenes on their 20 photographers/65 block parties magazine feature. (NY Times)

Have you seen the house on the top of a building on the Upper West Side? (I Love the Upper West Side)

There was a minor fire in Terminal 5. The damage was minimal and no one was injured. (Gothamist)

The best dive bars in NYC. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for September 16, 2019 – The “JUUL Miss Me When I’m Gone” Edition

Late-night subway disruptions, the MTA’s ballooning budget, the weekly restaurant closures, Rudy Giuliani’s divorce gets messy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

It’s a short list of subways that will be disrupted late nights this week. Even still, if you’re on the 1, 4, A, E, or R trains, you’ll want to check before you make late-night plans. (Subway Weekender)

It’s possible that the Cuomo-Byford feud may be softening. (Politico)

The city will allow bicyclists to ride past the United Nations during the General Assembly, a departure from previous years. It still won’t be easy. Each bicyclist will have to pass a security checkpoint before proceeding. (Streetsblog)

The governor announced the state will ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes with an emergency ruling. (Politico)

The city will be showing off some early design concepts for the Sunnyside Yards. (Sunnyside Post)

The city is calling its renovation of Fort Greene “routine work” to avoid doing a full environmental review. The Sierra Club is leading a lawsuit against the city for the classification and lack of review. (Patch)

The photos of Battery Park as a wheat field are weird. In 1982 there were two acres of wheat planted as an art installation which also yielded a thousand pounds of wheat. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA was headed for a $392 million budget gap in 2020, but that was before the MTA decided to hire 500 additional police officers. (Politico)

The MTA’s on-time performance rate hit 84% last month from 68% the previous August. The future of the MTA is all in the 2020-2024 capital plan, which hasn’t been made public and will be voted on on October 1. (6sqft)

Where to have a last-minute fancy dinner. (The Infatuation)

“I’m sad to know that the hero of 9/11 has become a liar.” Is anyone surprised that Rudy Giuliani’s divorce is a huge mess? (Splinter)

Luxury apartments are changing the city’s skyline, but they aren’t selling. 25% of the luxury apartments built since 2013 have never been sold. (Gothamist)

Speaking of luxury apartments, there will be 700 new luxury apartments will be built in Dumbo as part of a development on a three-acre parking lot. (NY Times)

A class-action lawsuit over a lack of wine coolers in luxury apartments in Hudson Square. (Patch)

Here are this week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. No one hit over 100 points, but the Eataly kiosks in Flatiron had the highest violation score. (Patch)

The mayor is fighting back against allegations that his sudden embrace of restricting hotel development in the city has something to do with a presidential endorsement from the Hotel Trades Council union. (Politico)

Would you love to brunch at the new TWA Hotel but don’t want to travel like a peasant to get there? Well, now you can take a private helicopter to brunch from lower Manhattan. (Time Out)

After a few weeks of confusion, the state has clarified that landlords and brokers are both going to be held to the new $20 application fee limit. Before the ruling, agents were charging high fees because a landlord wasn’t allowed to. (Gothamist)

A man with a sword was arrested at the observation deck of the Empire State Building. (amNY)

It’s the kind of trash talk you need to see to believe. (@edenbrower)

Whoops, an NYPD school safety officer was arrested for possession of three pounds of marijuana. (SI Live)

Are you the person who bought a $10 million lotto ticket in the Bronx? (Welcome2TheBronx)

Sometimes trash is old food and mile-long CVS receipts. Sometimes it’s 20,000 slides of fashion shows from the 1980s. (Jezebel)

22 places for a stellar meal in Soho. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 27, 2019 – The “End the Gifted Programs to Desegregate the City’s Schools” Edition

This winter will be a tough one, a ghost kitchen haunts Soho, the 7 train destroys a morning commute, officials want answers about the BQE and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Why can’t New York be a modern city? The answer lies in the billion-dollar fiefdoms controlled by city and state agencies and can be illustrated by a simple dog walk. (New York Mag)

Another person was killed by a driver on Coney Island Avenue. A 40-year-old man was lying on the sidewalk near a parking garage when he was run over by someone pulling into the garage a little after midnight on Monday. This is the fourth person killed on or near Coney Island Avenue this year. (Streetsblog)

This week marks the 243rd anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn, the first battle of the Revolutionary War. Ten spots to mark the anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn. (Untapped Cities)

A panel of experts has a recommendation on how to end segregation in the city’s schools: close all the gifted programs. (NY Times)

If you’re someone who keeps a spreadsheet of the best food in Chinatown (I know more than one person who does this), strike Yee Li, formerly New Big Wang, from the list. After 33 years on the corner of Elizabeth and Bayard, the restaurant is closed but lives on in spirit at the family’s new restaurant, New Yee Li, on Fort Hamilton Parkway in Brooklyn.

Surprise! A broken rail on the 7 train ruined Monday morning’s commute on the 7, E, M, F and R trains. (Gothamist)

Photos and more photos from Afropunk (Gothamist and Brooklyn Vegan)

If you’re wondering what’s going on with the replacement of the BQE near the Brooklyn Promenade, you’re not alone. Multiple city and federal officials signed onto a letter looking for answers from the Department of Transportation. (Curbed)

A ghost kitchen is coming to Soho. Zuul, literally named after Zuul the Gatekeeper of Gozer from Ghostbusters, will house multiple restaurants who will only offer delivery. Sweetgreen, Junzi, Sarge’s, Naya, Stone Bridge Pizza & Salad, and POsitive Foods have already signed on. There is no restaurant, only Zuul. (Eater)

The Farmers’ Almanac has made their predictions for winter 2020 and you’re really gonna hate this. “With colder-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast and above-normal precipitation expected, our outlook forewarns of not only a good amount of snow, but also a wintry mix of rain and sleet—especially along the coast.” They are also predicting an extended winter and a slow start to spring. (Patch)

Today is PSL day in Starbucks across the country, but get ready for the Pumpkin Cream Cold Brew, the latest abomination destined for success. (Grub Street)

The Kosciuszko Bridge will open on Thursday, four years ahead of schedule, and bring with it pedestrian and bike lanes. (Curbed)

A state Supreme Court Judge upheld the state’s ban on religious exemptions to vaccinations for all children in public or private schools, put in place after the measles outbreak this year. The plaintiffs plan to appeal the decision. (Gothamist)

Arthur Schwartz, the lawyer leading the legal arguments against the 14th St busway who likened people protesting him to “white hooded zealots,” has compared Jane Jacobs’ fight in the ’60s against Robert Moses to his fight against “our millennial version of Robert Moses” Polly Trottenberg. Trottenberg, who graduated from Barnard College in 1986 and is not a millennial. (The Villager)

Statues for Equality by Gillie and Marc bring statues of ten women to Sixth Avenue on the anniversary of women getting the right to vote. (Untapped Cities)

Despite the president’s tweet that the federal government is working to extend the Q train to 125th St, nothing has been done by the Trump administration to prove his words remotely true. (6sqft)

Why do some buildings allow roof access and some do not? (Street Easy)

The overall number of overdose deaths in the city is down, but the Bronx, Staten Island, and Manhattan all saw increases. Rates are down among black and white New Yorkers but are up among Latinos. (amNY)

Taylor Swift’s “Cornelia Street” on her new album mentions the townhouse she rented in Greenwich Village. Take a look inside. (Curbed)

Would you believe that the NYPD Detective Darryl Schwartz, who is being sued for allegedly making bogus DWI arrests in order to earn extra overtime, has a history of misconduct? (Gothamist)

Anyerson Delacruz-Rosario was arrested in the Dominican Republic for his part in trafficking hundreds of thousands of packets of heroin and fentanyl to New York City. (Patch)

The lawsuit against the Central Park West bike lane appears to be in jeopardy as the building who filed the suit is facing internal challenges against it and possibly violated state law with the filing. (Streetsblog)

A tribute to the 99 cent pizza slice in the form of a new mural by City Kitty. (EV Grieve)

The best lunch spots in Midtown. (Thrillist)

Thanks to Baily Crawford (@blycrawford) for today’s featured photo!