The Briefly for November 15-16, 2020 – The “President of NYC Buses?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The city’s new Covid-19 restrictions, the Brooklyn Cyclones are expanding, Pearl River Mark expands, a new RBG mural, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 60˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.

The CDC updated its mask guidance to explicitly say that masks help prevent the spread of disease by protecting people in the mask wearer’s vicinity, but wearing a mask will also help prevent you from contracting Covid-19. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The state is implementing new rules on the city in light of the rise in Covid-19 cases. Indoor and outdoor dining, along with gyms, will close at 10 pm and Indoor and outdoor gatherings in private will be limited to 10 people. These are the three vectors for spread, according to the state’s contact tracers. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The protected Crescent St bike lane in Astoria was finished last month to complaints from cyclists that it didn’t provide adequate protection. This week, a scooter rider was killed by a delivery truck driver, making it the 205th person to be killed on city streets this year, up from 185 last year. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Speaking of protected bike lanes, there has been a car parking in the 4th Ave protected bike lane in Brooklyn for at least four months. The protected bike lane is literally painted around this car. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Interview: MTA Bus President Craig Cipriano on a fully electric fleet, what the MTA would do with funding from a Biden administration, and wait, there’s a bus president? (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Where to pre-order Thanksgiving pies in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Congressional race for the 11th congressional district is over with Max Rose conceding to Nicole Malliotakis, who will go on to represent a portion of Brooklyn and all of Staten Island in the House of Representatives. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

While the Staten Island Yankees are dead, the Brooklyn Cyclones have received an upgrade from the Mets. The team will become a full-season High-A team, meaning more games in Coney Island from April through September. (Jim Dolan for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The city is set to launch a pilot program next year that will see healthcare professionals responding to people suffering a mental health crisis instead of the NYPD. The pilot will start in two yet to be named communities. (Joe Jurado for The Root)

Starting December 3 through March 4, you can catch a monthly light show projected onto the side of the Manhattan Bridge. The installations are part of the LIGHT YEAR project and will be viewable online because who the hell knows when this pandemic will ever end. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The lawsuit seeking to expand indoor dining from 25% capacity to 50% capacity was thrown out. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Photo: A new mural of Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the corner of 1st and 11th. This replaces the Shepard Fairey “Rise Above” mural. (@ellestreetart)

The top 100 albums of the year, from Williamsburg’s Rough Trade. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Farewell to The Creek & The Cave, the comedy club in Long Island City open for 14 years, forced closed bt the pandemic. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

On Tuesday I was worried about a cold being something worse and found out what all people looking to get tested have discovered, with the rise in cases in NYC, long lines for testing have returned. I tested negative. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

This is the same Staten Island that is now NYC’s epicenter for Covid-19. Or as the Times puts it “Staten Island has bristled at coronavirus restrictions, but now has the highest positive test rate in the city,” which is the most inappropriate use of the word “but” in the history of the Times. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Alexandra E. Petri for NY Times)

This week Dr. Anthony Fauci was honored by Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams for being a Covid-19 Hero. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Inside the city’s billion-dollar PPE bungle. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Attention Upper West Siders with dogs: don’t use the Museum of Natural History’s fenced off as a dog toilet. The museum is adjacent to a dog run and across the street from Central Park. (I Love the Upper West Side)

No matter what side you land on in the Industry City rezoning, the debate over the plan’s merits made clear that our Sunset Park community is in dire need of new housing — especially affordable units.
-Nelson Santana, Without Industry City rezoning, Sunset Parks needs affordable housing to stop displacement, for Brooklyn Paper

Marseille and Nizza in Hell’s Kitchen are giving actors a break and allowing them to eat now and pay whenever they’re able to again. (NY1)

Pearl River Mart is expanding beyond its original concept as a department store. The Pearl River Mart Foods is now open at the Chelsea Market, a market devoted to Ascian foods. (Roger Clark for NY1)

A look at the city’s manufacturing industry and what businesses are doing to stay relevant and in NYC. (Greg David for The City)

It is sad to see how deep this cowardice goes.” -AOC on Republicans refusing to acknowledge Biden’s victory. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

RIP Pearl Chin, founder of the Upper West Side’s Knitty City. (Alex Vadukul for NY Times)

Two years after the Civilian Complaint Review Board announced that it would begin to investigate police sexual misconduct, the CCRB is starting the process again and seeking public comment on new rules that allow it to probe sexual misconduct claims against the NYPD. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

The unmasking of “Clouseau” set us back, not only in the relationship between the NYPD and the community but within the department itself. The NYPD is one of the most diverse police departments in the country, with over 50 percent of its members being non-white. It should come as no surprise that members of the NYPD experience racism and sexism, just like the citizens they protect.
-Berby St. Fort and Eric Adams, a ranking member of the NYPD and the Brooklyn borough president, Time for NYPD to have a reckoning over equality within the ranks, for Brooklyn Paper

The restaurant rent crisis is continuing, with 88% of restaurants and bars unable to make rent in October. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Brian Maiorana was ordered heled without bail for threatening violence against people celebrating the election results and also violating restrictions imposed against him as a registered sex offender. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Where to eat in Williamsburg right now. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 8, 2020 – The “The Suburban Exodus That Never Was” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The Covid-19 school dashboard, how to track your absentee ballot, the best new pizza in Brooklyn, the BQX is dead, and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 82˚
Clear throughout the day.

The Board of Elections in the city launched an Absentee Ballot Tracking system to confirm they received your request, mailed your ballot, accepted your ballot, and how to fix it if they didn’t accept it. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

How helpful is New York’s Covid-19 infection rate? It’s the metric we’re using for keeping public schools open and arguing that we’re ready for indoor restaurants to open. It’s a self-selecting number and experts are pointing out that it’s artificially low in New York. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

A Bay Ridge couple was escorted off an NYC Ferry in handcuffs and given a summons for their refusal to wear masks. They also claimed they were being targeted because they were white. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Normally getting hit with a “here come the stink bugs” headline is fine, but in 2020? Give me a break. (Adam Nichols, Reported by Beth Dalby for Patch)

The mass migration to the suburbs isn’t happening. (Jeff Andrews for Curbed)

A quiet Trump administration rule change that could pull FEMA Covid-19 disinfection funding for the city’s subways and schools. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer put forward a proposal to add 75 miles of bike lanes around 50 schools. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The state is launching a dashboard to track Covid-19 cases in public schools. It’ll be available on September 9. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

21 schools in the city will not reopen due to problems with ventilation systems, switching to remote-only instruction. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

798 of the city’s 1,600 public schools have been approved for outdoor learning this fall. Schools can still apply, so expect that number to increase. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Make your way downtown and Vanessa Carlton’s Soho loft can be yours for a cool $15,500 a month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Often you’ll see headlines about high-end restaurants or restaurants with chefs with a pedigree, but let’s celebrate the more normal. A 99 cent Pizza and hot dog joint opened up on Ave A. (EV Grieve)

Video: Héctor Zamora discusses “Lattice Detour,” his exhibition on the roof of The Met. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Where to eat and drink with your dog. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The city missed its own August 31 deadline for the final report in the investigation into the summer’s protests. The Civilian Complaint Review Board received 750 complaints from 250 incidents. What is the repercussion for missing the deadline? There are no repercussions. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

A look at the Black Surfing Association, who organized their fifth paddle out to protest police violence against Black people. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

J’Ouvert this year was marked with an eerily quiet Brooklyn with a heavy police presence with occasional small gatherings. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s recent uptick in shooting violence was felt at an unofficial J’Ouvert celebration, with five people being shot, including a six-year-old boy. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Photos: It’s a tough bird to find, but a sora was spotted in Bryant Park over the weekend. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

How Astoria’s Niko’s Souvlaki persevered through the pandemic. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Buglisi Dance Theatre and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Table of Silence Project 9/11 performance ritual for peace will be streamed online. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

It looks like the Mets may have a new owner in Steve Cohen for about $2.35 billion. He’ll need to get 23 team owners to approve the purchase of 80% of the team. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The shooting death of Henryk Siwiak, killed on 9/11/2001, is the last unsolved murder of 9/11. (Ephemeral New York)

Governor Cuomo continues to fight against taxing the ultrarich. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Photos and Video: The NYC Deep Playa Night Ride, New York’s one-night answer to Burning Man, but on bikes and without the tech executives. (EV Grieve)

No, it’s not you, there are more mosquitoes this year than in years past. (Amy Pearl for Gothamist)

“Contingent and student workers have been disproportionately burdened by the NYU administration’s choices, and plans for Fall 2020 reproduce this inequity. High-level administrators and tenured faculty have been allowed to work remotely, while contingent faculty and workers must weigh health concerns against job security. This approach will compound existing inequalities, and will not keep us safe. We must make different choices.”
NYU: Keep Our Campus Safe petition

The Brooklyn Flea is bringing the open-air Chelsea Flea Market back on Saturdays and Sundays. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The mayor won’t make a decision about anything unless he’s forced to, including his own pet project, the BQX. Instead of just saying “this thing ain’t happening,” he’s punted the entire project to the next mayor. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

New York Attorney General Letitia James suspended the collection of medical and student debt that has been specifically referred to her office for collection for an additional 30 days. (Norwood News)

How to break a lease in NYC. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

The de Blasio administration withdrew its support for the YourLIC Coalition, the group of developers who were going to develop a 28-acre area on the Long Island City waterfront, the cursed spot o the Amazon HQ 2 development. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

The story of Jess La Bombera, aka Jessica A. Krug, the white woman from Kansas City pretending to be Afro Latina and from the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The most beautiful post offices in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The best new pizza in Brooklyn. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 29, 2020 – The “Even Aliens and UFOs Have Left New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Macy’s unannounced fireworks start tonight, the NYPD pepper-sprays a Pride march, open street dining, beaches opening this week and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

Get ready, because tonight starts Macy’s ill-conceived fireworks displays across the city for the next five nights. The city said they will send notifications a few minutes before they start(Ron Lee for NY1)

The story of Charlie H. Cochrane, Jr., the NYPD’s first openly gay cop, who joined the force in 1967. (Carey Reed Zamarriego for Untapped Cities)

Photos: Pride Weekend’s Drag March. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

More Photos: The Drag March. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD celebrated Pride in their traditional style by pepper-spraying and arresting participants of the Queer Liberation March during a dance party in Washington Square Park. (Duncan Osborne for Gothamist)

Answering questions about the availability of the NYPD’s disciplinary records, which will become available in July. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

17 members of the city’s Corrections Department will face departmental charges for their roles in the death of Rikers Island inmate Layleen Polanco last June. Bronx District Attorney Darcel D. Clark and the city’s Department of Investigation have refused to pursue criminal charges. (Jan Ransom and Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

How Occupy City Hall’s 24-hour protests came to be. (Juliana Kim, photos by Amr Alfiky for NY Times)

“Yet on day one of his mayoralty, de Blasio betrayed his word—and even more, the Black and Hispanic communities of New York City—by bringing back an even more blatantly discriminatory policing strategy: the practice of aggressive misdemeanor arrests known as “broken windows policing.””
-Bernard E. Harcourt, professor of law and political science at Columbia University, for Gothamist, Mayor De Blasio’s Police Strategy Has Always Been Racist

The number of UFOs reported across America in the first three months of the year shot up by 112%, but New York’s UFO sightings are among the country’s lowest. Even the aliens know it’s not a good time to see the city. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The headline says it best: The Garbage-Scented, Siren-Laden, and Yet Still Pleasant Reality of Dining Outside Right Now (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

There are over 5,650 restaurants open for outdoor dining in the city, the Department of Transportation has an interactive map. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe some of these locations need to be double-checked since they’re in the middle of bike lanes, which is forbidden by the new guidelines. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The experience of a day of phase two inside Veselka. (Ryan Sutton, photos by Gary He for Eater)

Six ways restaurants have been innovating to enforce social distancing. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The state has extended its to-go cocktail laws for an additional 30 days. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Five years of lessons learned from writing about food and dining. (Serena Dai for Eater, good luck on your new gig)

“For years, the NYPD has used the city’s public drinking laws as a simple pretext for the harassment of communities of color. Of the 15 city police precincts that wrote the most summonses for open-containers in 2010, 12 were located in communities of color. A separate Brooklyn study found that 85 percent of open container citations in that borough were given to Black and brown residents, and only 4 percent to whites.”
-Shabazz Stuart, CEO of Oonee, for Streetsblog, It’s Time to Legalize Public Drinking for All New Yorkers

Dog runs, basketball courts, tennis courts, volleyball courts, handball courts, and bocce courts are returning to the city’s parks with phase three. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything known about indoor dining, which starts on July 6 in phase three of the city’s reopening. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

For the second time in two decades, the MTA is facing a “doomsday budget.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

James Dolan owns Madison Square Garden and the Knicks and might be one of the biggest idiots in the entire city. The CDC’s website with information on Covid-19 antibodies clearly states “Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last.” Has that stopped James Dolan from saying he wants to fill Madison Square Garden with people who have tested positive for antibodies for a benefit show? No it has not. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A deeper dive into the Summer Youth Employment Program, how its elimination by the de Blasio administration disproportionally affects people of color, and why kids are fighting to bring it back. (Rainer Harris for Curbed)

Red Hook’s Fairway will close by July 17. The landlord will look for a grocery store to take its place. (Liena Zagare for BKLYNER)

Mayor de Blasio is calling for a full eviction moratorium through August 20 and for the state place tenants who miss rent on a year-long payment plan to make up for back rent once they are able to work. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

New York Hall of Science won’t be reopening in 2020, opting for a 2021 date. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Getting students into classrooms in the fall, if that is an option at all, will be a difficult task. The CDC calling for children to be six feet apart, which would be impossible in the city’s 150 schools that are already operating at a capacity of 150% or more. For instance, Francis Lewis High School in Queens is built for 2,188, has 4,492 students and capacity will have to be cut to around 1,000. Whatever happens, school will not be returning to normal in the fall. (Ashleigh Garrison for Chalkbeat)

RIP Milton Glaser, who created the I ♥ NY logo. (William Grimes for NY Times)

It’s a great apartment that will be plagued with construction noise through 2035, but you’ll be close to the trains! (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Spring training hasn’t begun yet and Vegas is already predicting a better season for the Yankees than the Mets. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral welcomed people for Sunday Mass for the first time since March. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s affordable housing lottery is anything but fair to the people who can afford the least. For each apartment available for “extremely low-income” families there are 650 applicants. That is nearly 5x as many applicants for apartments for families making between $122k and $168k/year. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Sunday’s double rainbow. What does it mean? (EV Grieve)

Do you know what this city doesn’t need? A sinkhole problem. A sinkhole nearly ate an SUV on the Lower East Side over the weekend. (EV Grieve)

There are nine NYC beaches opening for swimming on July 1st. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!