The Briefly for January 28, 2019 – The “A Complete Lack of Ability to Enforce the Law” Edition

Big changes to the L train’s schedule, what the government shutdown’s shutdown means for NYC, a couch in a tree, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The 2, 3, 4, 7, A, D, E, and L trains are going through some major service disruptions late nights. (Subway Changes)

Starting today, there is no overnight L service between Broadway Junction to Manhattan for eight weeks. Starting February 1, the L will be shutdown for seven weekends straight. Yipes. (Brooklyn Paper)

The government shutdown is over, here’s what it means for New York City. (Metro)

The city has been proven to be mostly impotent when it comes to removing the billboard boats from city waters. (Gothamist)

The NYPD can’t enforce traffic violations in bike lanes AND bus lanes. That would be crazy! (NY Post)

It’s been 27 years, but the NYPD arrested Calvin Grant for the alleged murder of Stacey Lynette Joyner in Brownsville. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Now that his opinion means nothing to the situation, Mayor de Blasio has decided that he supports the governor’s L Train repair plan. (NY Post)

Kudos to the winning team from the 2019 Idiotarod. Take a look at this year’s idiots. (Brian Lin)

The subways, explained. (Curbed)

The Daily News’ editorial board is in favor of subway, bus, and bridge toll hikes. (Daily News)

The $298 million Powerball winner has come forward, and he’s happy to tell you he quit his job. (NY Post)

Pity the millionaires who have been moving out of the New York City area because of the financial markets and taxes. 5,700 people worth between $1 and $30 million people have moved. (The Real Deal)

Meet the 65 year-old professor with 600,000 Instagram followers. (New York Magazine)

No one tell the city’s real estate developers that artists are embracing the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (amNY)

Of the 472 sexual harassment complaints by city employees in 2018, only 37 of them were resulted in termination, demotion, retirement, transfer, or suspension. (NY Post)

Seriously, how did this couch end up in this tree? (West Side Rag)

15 things you probably didn’t know about the East Village. (6sqft)

There’s beef between Bareburger and one of the New York’s franchisors. (NY Post)

Max Rose hasn’t been in the House of Representatives for a month and Republican challengers have already started to emerge. (Bklyner)

17 bars to BYOF (bring your own food). (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for January 17, 2019 – The “The Pizza Wars and Other Famous Food Fights” Edition

Legal marijuana will bring the state an estimated $300 million this year, someone stole an MTA bus again, the best cheap falafel, electric scooters could become legal and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Legal pot is estimated to bring in $300 million in sales tax revenue this year, which seems like a good amount of money until you hear congestion pricing would bring in $13-15 billion. (Gothamist)

George Washington did not have wooden dentures. Don’t believe it? You can see them for yourself at the NY Academy of Medicine. (Untapped Cities)

A history of protests in NYC’s public parks. (6sqft)

The pizza wars, the cupcake rivalries, the seafood bar copycat, the Rockaway Beach taco fight, and the doughnut dispute: The hottest restaurant feuds in the city. (Eater)

The 2-year-old autistic girl who was allegedly abducted by her father and was the subject of an AMBER alert on Wednesday night, was found and is safe. (NY Post)

Is it better to buy or rent? (Curbed)

One person is dead and two are injured after a man entered a buffet in Sheepshead Bay and allegedly started attacking employees with a hammer. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Where to go for lunch when you have jury duty in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Based)

“Roaming Underfoot” is the tile mosaic centerpiece of the newly opened 28th St stop on the 6. The work is meant to capture Madison Square Park’s role as an urban sanctuary. (MTA)

Five takeaways from Tuesday’s emergency L train shutdown meeting. (Curbed)

On set for the new season of High Maintenance. (Gothamist)

A breakdown of the new “mom uniform” of Park Slope. Only the most important stories from the paper of record. (NY Times)

Whoopi Goldberg, sudden transit expert, gave the mayor a piece of her mind and said a bunch of falsehoods about bike lanes and Tenth Avenue on The View. (NY Post)

“If you are mad that bike lanes take away driving lanes or parking, ask yourself why you are more entitled to that public space than a cyclist. The answer can’t be ‘because that’s how it was before.'” (@Jill_Jorgensen)

For the third time in a month, someone stole an MTA bus and took it for a joyride. This time someone drove a bus from Queens to Brooklyn and it went unnoticed for two hours until the bus was found undamaged on the street. (NY Post)

We aren’t getting hit by a winter storm this weekend. We’re getting hit by two. (Gothamist)

23 restaurants and bars to try in Midtown East. (Eater)

Are you ready for a super blood wolf lunar moon this weekend? Watch the skies from 11:30pm-12:30am on Sunday night for the greatest visual effect, but be wary of werewolves. (Gothamist)

The state will let local municipalities decide to make electric scooters or bikes legal. Currently unassisted electric bikes and scooters are both illegal in the city, despite their widespread usage. (Streetsblog)

An NYPD officer, 28-year-old Brian Kessler, was killed in a head-on collision with a garbage truck in the Bronx. (NY Post)

Is this the best cheap falafel in the city? (Viewing NYC)

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The Briefly for December 21, 2018 – The “What A Federal Shutdown Means for New York” Edition

Weekend subway changes, Pilotworks is dead (again), the Nobel Peace Prize winning Santa, the E and M trains get their own mini-shutdown, Christmas in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway changes and construction. (Subway Weekender)

10 must-visit spots in Long Island City. You should probably visit before Bezos moves in. (Untapped Cities)

20 candidates in a 90 minute Q&A session. The Public Advocate election is getting crowded. (Bklyner)

The man who promised to save the dead Brooklyn food incubator Pilotworks has decided to back out of the deal. (Eater)

Here’s what a federal government shutdown would mean for New York City. (Patch)

The city’s Independent Budget Office says the city’s financial situation is “relatively strong,” but admits the city faces “significant uncertainty” around public services like the subway, the NYCHA, and public hospitals. (Metro)

Harvey Weinstein’s request to dismiss his sexual assault charge was denied and the case will go forward. (NY Times)

If you thought the L train shutdown or the BQE replacement was going to be a mess, just wait for the twenty year work on the Grand Central Terminal train shed. The train shed is the size of 20 football fields and runs from 42nd Street to 57th Street. (6sqft)

New York City is Atlas Obscura’s most popular destination of 2018. Duh. (amNY)

The man who portrays Santa in Bryant Park is a Nobel Peace Prize-winner for being a charter member of the American branch of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War. What do you want for Christmas? This Santa already brought us a small slice of world peace. (amNY)

No matter how rough your SantaCon was, it wasn’t as bad as Christopher Visone’s, who just woke up from his medically induced coma. (Gothamist)

Parking Summons Advocate Jean Wesh will finally open his lower Manhattan office today after eight months being on the job. (NY Post)

Say goodbye to the E and M tunnel between Queens and Manhattan. It’s not exactly the L train shutdown, it will be closed from December 26 until December 31 for repairs. (LIC Post)

Calvert Vaux’s fingerprint is all over the city. Learn about the co-designer of Central Park and multiple landmarks across the city. (GVSHP)

So this is Christmas. How are you going to get around the city? (Curbed)

He snuck prostitutes into his apartment in suitcases and other details you didn’t want to know about Eliot Spitzer’s sex life. (NY Post)

L train shutdown be damned. Retail real estate in Williamsburg is the highest among 16 retail corridors in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’d rather do anything than take the train to Dyker Heights on a winter night, you can check out the photos instead. (amNY)

The city is lying when they boast about building 20.9 miles of protected bike lanes in 2018. The real number is 23% less. (Streetsblog)

Congestion pricing will not take effect January 1, thanks to a lawsuit on behalf of the taxi industry, claiming the practice is discriminatory. The ruling by Supreme Court Justice Martin Schulman will delay the start until a full hearing can be scheduled. (NY Post)

A little league baseball field isn’t the ideal location for a four year parking lot for construction vehicles, but that’s what the West Side Little League is looking at. (West Side Rag)

State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself!” Parker is signing up for Thrive NYC’s mental-health courses after his outburst on Twitter. No word on what he’ll do about his car sporting the wrong license plate, a lapsed inspection, and an un-authorized parking placard. (NY Post)

A story of two old friends who met on New Year’s Eve on 1979 while watching the ball drop from their respective taxis, and how their close friendship has changed over the years to provide a support structure against the harshness of an uncaring city. (NY Times)

A look at ABC No Rio’s four story “Passive House” building, set to begin construction next year. (Bowery Boogie)

The 12 best restaurants in Brooklyn Heights. (GrubStreet)

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