The Briefly for June 26, 2020 – The “Welcome to Manhattan, $20 Please” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The CBGB Caucus, phase three could start on July 6, vendors return to Rockaway Beach, Harlem gets a Black Lives Matter street mural, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 74˚ High: 86˚

2020 is the year that everyone wants to start selling nutcrackers. (Margot Boyer-Dry for NY Times)

Without federal assistance, the MTA is leaving nothing in the table when it comes to attempting to make up for a combined $15 billion of lost revenue over two years. Already discussed are the disastrous combinations of non‐personnel expense reductions, reductions in force, fare and toll increases, service reductions, and “long‐term deficit financing.” (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

With the MTA’s trouble at the front of mind, let’s not forget that the city is waiting on federal approval for congestion pricing to enter Manhattan. A Cornell University study found that a $20 toll could reduce Manhattan’s traffic by 40%, greenhouse gas emission could be cut by 15%, and ridership on mass transit would increase by 6%. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA will rename two Brooklyn subway stops to include the name of Medgar Evers College, thanks to legislation from Assembly Member Diana Richardson and State Senator Zellnor Myrie. The new stops will be named Franklin Avenue-Medgar Evers College and President Street-Medgar Evers College. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

One of the hardest-hit industries during the pandemic is dog walkers. As life slowly edges towards normal and dog adoptions have spiked, can dog walker rebound? (Mili Godio for Bedford + Bowery)

City Councilmember Ritchie Torres has a sizable lead in the 15th Congressional District in the South Bronx. If that lead persists through the counting of absentee ballots, he could be the first out gay Afro-Latinx member of Congress. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The NYPD promoted three people of color to chief positions. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

David Afanador, the cop who allegedly put a man in an illegal chokehold in Queens days after it became illegal across the state, turned himself in and was charged with attempted aggravated strangulation and strangulation in the second degree. If convicted, he could face seven years in prison. (NY1)

Identifying 10 streets that would be ideal to close for outdoor dining. (Eater)

22 branches of the NYPL, QPL, and BPL will be opening on July 13 for grab-and-go service. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Grub Street floats an interesting idea: Should this be the end of the traditional menu? Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

We’re five days into phase two, which means the city is turning its eyes towards phase three, which includes basketball courts, dog runs, indoor restaurant service, nail salons, massage therapists, and other personal care services. The city is on pace to hit phase three on July 6. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

City Councilmembers Justin Brannan and Keith Powers have formed the “CBGB Caucus” as a way to help support independent music venues that remain closed and will remain closed through phase three, across the city. In a letter to the city’s Congressional Delegation, they outline support for a benefit for venues that have been completely unable to open due to the pandemic and emergency unemployment benefits for their workers. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The New-York Historical Society will, with approval from the city, be opening on August 14 with an outdoor exhibition called “Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine“. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

As stores slowly reopen, there’s a movement to preserve the protest art that adorned storefronts around SoHo. (NY1)

It’s less than reassuring to know that in the week of a primary, the NYC Board of Elections Director was fined for violating the city’s ethics law. The center of the violation is a hotel stay in 2018 that was paid for by Election Systems & Software while he was serving on their board, a company that the city purchases election machines and supplies from. He resigned from his position with ES&S later in 2018. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The local election to watch this fall will be Trump-supporting Republican challenger Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis trying to unseat Democratic incumbent Rep. Max Rose. Only a few days out from the primaries and both are on the attack. Rose called Malliotakis “a fraud who represents everything we hate about our politics.” (Rose Adams for amNewyork Metro)

Farewell to the Way Station, the Doctor Who-themed bar in Prospect Heights, who will not be regenerating after the pandemic. (Serena Dai for Eater)

10 chefs and restauranteurs discuss how they feel about reopening. (The Infatuation)

The New York City Council voted Thursday to legalize e-bikes and e-scooters for use on city streets, forcing the mayor to confront a reversal of his ill-conceived and poorly-executed crackdown of electric bikes. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Take a walk around the Rink at Rockefeller Center and it will become impossible to not see the 100 Pride flags flying around the plaza as a part of Rockefeller Center’s celebration of World Pride Day. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

If you can’t get out and do a socially-distant tour of LGBTQ+ landmarks across the city the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project and CyArk created a 3D virtual tour. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A look at Attorney General William Barr’s attempt to undermine New York’s federal prosecutors. (Benjamin Weiser, Ben Protess, Katie Benner and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

New York is releasing $65 million in federal money to help preschools and daycare centers reopen after the coronavirus forced many to close down. The preschools and daycares say it isn’t enough. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Harlem will be getting a Black Lives Matter street mural on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard between 125th and 127th Streets. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A look at the positive impact the city’s use of hotel rooms as homeless shelters can have. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

It won’t be happening this weekend, but along with lifeguards, food vendors are coming back to Rockaway Beach on July 1. (Alexander Jusdanis for Bedford + Bowery)

28 NYC restaurants with new outdoor dining. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chris for today’s photo of the new VBallentine mural in Crown Heights.

The Briefly for June 5, 2020 – The “Black Lives Matter. Say Their Names.” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: An open letter from the neighborhood around the Barclays Center, the NYC memorial for George Floyd, calling for a repeal of “Walking While Trans,” and more

Today – Low: 68˚ High: 77˚
Rain throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 60˚ High: 82˚

Terrance Floyd, George Floyd’s brother, was in attendance for a memorial service for George Floyd in Cadman Plaza on Thursday afternoon. Speakers included Terrance Floyd, Cirlane McCray. Mayor de Blasio (who was showered with boos and calls for his resignation), Attorney General Letitia James, members of New York’s congressional delegation, and Reverend Kevin McCall. (Emmy Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

Photos: Workers from Bellevue Hospital demonstrated and knelt for eight minutes and 46 seconds to honor George Floyd on Thursday, the length of time a Minneapolis police officer knelt on Floyd’s neck to kill him. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Breonna Taylor was killed by a police officer in Louisville, Kentucky in her own home. A Wednesday night protest through Brooklyn was in her name to ensure she is not forgotten in the national Black Lives Matter conversation and her family can achieve the justice they deserve. (Emmy Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

“The incidents that took place over the last several days in the neighborhoods surrounding the Barclays Center in Brooklyn where members of the NYPD showed that they are not capable of de-escalating protest activity without an egregious use of force are inexcusable. As organizations who have committed to ensuring that our neighborhoods remain places where commerce, retail, livability and safety are actualized, we will not settle for harsh policing as the answer — not now, not in our neighborhoods, and not in our City.”
-Hundreds of residents, politicians, and civic organizations that border the Barclays Center, Brooklyn’s central hub for protests, Community Letter to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

There was an 1845 New York law that said it was illegal for two or more people wearing masks or any face covering from congregating in a public place. It was repealed by the state’s legislature. Maybe next time I try to wear my horse mask to watch the Thanksgiving Day parade, I can do so in peace. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The city is allocating $500,000 in grants for Bronx businesses that were recently vandalized and looted, up to $10,000 for each business. The city worked with SOMOS Community Care to help secure funding. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Jamel Floyd, an inmate at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park, died on Wednesday after corrections officers pepper-sprayed him in the face for being disruptive. (Aidan Graham for Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD’s poor handling of protesters doesn’t stop after their done beating them on the streets. Once inside One Police Plaza, arrestees denied due process, held for over 24 hours, and are subjected to increase risks of Covid-19, according to the Legal Aid Society. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Manhattan’s DA Cy Vance wants to hold looting suspects without bail, looking to Governor Cuomo to bypass state laws and calling for more “judicial discretion.” (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The Civilian Complaint Review Board, an independent agency that investigates reports of police misconduct, has logged more than 500 complaints related to the George Floyd protests during six days. (Rose Adams and Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

You can file a complaint of police misconduct to the CCRB online.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer has outlined three specificities to accompany his demand that the NYPD’s budget is reduced by $1.1 billion. A hiring freeze and a reduction of police officers to pre-de Blasio numbers (35,000), a 5% cut in overtime, and better disciplining of officers to reduce brutality settlements. When it comes to the settlements, I would assume that the city’s comptroller knows this, but police brutality settlements come from a separate budget than the NYPD’s budget. In 2018 the city paid $237.4 million to settle lawsuits, but that was in addition to the NYPD’s budget. Every settlement that the city has to make with victims of the NYPD’s disgusting acts of violence is additional money they are taking from the city’s budget. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The NYPD has begun taking bikes from protesters. There have been multiple reports of bikes being confiscated with no paperwork on retrieving them once they are seized. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

“What pressing responsibilities have so occupied these two officials that they do not have the time to make sure the safety of New Yorkers is protected and the rights of New Yorkers are respected? How is it possible that after so many reports of police misconduct, they still can’t be bothered to supervise the police?”
-The New York Times Editorial Board, Mayor de Blasio, Open Your Eyes. The Police Are Out of Control

New York’s Street Vendor Project released a statement in “unconditional solidarity” with the Movement for Black Lives. This may seem like a quizzical statement to report on, but silence in compliance. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Donald Trump Jr has decided that his new target for trolling is City Councilmember Justin Brannan. Good thing he doesn’t have anything better to do. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan for the MTA to reopen on Monday would serve about 8% of riders as 200,000-400,000 will return to work next week. The MTA has installed hand sanitizer dispensers at some stations and is looking to distribute two million face masks to those who need them. The subway will continue to cease overnight operations from 1-5 am. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

How will people stay safe on the subways when returning to work? “I really want to push back on the notion we can solve everything all the time.” -Mayor de Blasio (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Train operators and conductors have recorded the highest number of COVID-19 infections among subway workers, according to internal documents. the MTA had a ban on face masks that was lifted only days before the state went on pause. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Governor Cuomo is urging that between protests, New Yorkers find time for a Covid-19 test. Free Covid-19 tests have been expanded to all New Yorkers. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

Dentists offices will reopen for business on Monday. (Robert Pozarycki for Bronx Times)

NYC is on track to start phase one of reopening on Monday. (Erik Engquist for The Real Deal)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi endorsed Congressmember Eliot Engel in his primary against Jamaal Bowman, despite Engel being caught on a live mic saying “If I didn’t have a primary, I wouldn’t care,” when asked about vandalism in the Bronx. I would imagine that Pelosi feels a pressure to endorse established Democrats against challengers, but this feels egregious. (Heather Caygle and Sarah Ferris for Politico)

Request an absentee ballot to vote in the June 23 primary before June 16.

A look at Francesca “Sol” Chaney’s Black Supper, a free food program only for Black people who might be protesting nearby or simply need a pick-me-up. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Republican City Councilmember Eric Ulrich (whose website appears to be a dead Squarespace site) is making some big talking about calling for the City Council a vote of no confidence in Mayor de Blasio. In the last few months, he’s also demanded the firing of Commissioner of Health of the City of New York Dr. Oxiris Barbot. He will hit his term limit on the City Council in 2021 and has made multiple failed attempts to be elected to a higher office since his 2009 election. (1010 WINS)

A look at new outdoor art exhibitions coming this summer. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The MTA is calling for 60 miles of bus lanes in all five boroughs for the city’s phase one reopening to ensure that it can get New Yorkers to work. The mayor, a noted coward when it comes to leading, was noncommittal. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

A map of all the subway stations equipped with OMNY readers. (MTAPhotos)

More than 90 organizations signed onto a letter addressed to Governor Andrew Cuomo and other top lawmakers in the state urging them to ensure forthcoming criminal justice packages include repeal of a discriminatory loitering law frequently used by law enforcement to stop, profile, and arrest innocent transgender women of color. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Our libraries are returning, here are their reopening plans. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

An interactive NYC map that shows the closest bit of nature to your home. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

13 NYC restaurants supporting the Black community. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Mike for today’s featured photo of the Geoge Floyd Memorial in Brooklyn!

The Briefly for April 2, 2020 – The “Is Governor Cuomo’s Nipple Pierced?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo shuts down playgrounds, a map of infections by zip code, Ina Garten makes an appropriately sized margarita, free coloring books, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 57˚
Clear throughout the day.

Don’t ask AOC to make a TikTok. (@AOC)

Farmers’ markets are still happening across the city, but with stricter rules. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

The Right to Counsel NYC Coalition and Housing Justice for All have released a guide for tenants interesting in organizing a rent strike. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The NYS Bar Association and the state’s Unified Court System announced they partnered to create a network of pro bono lawyers willing to help out with the surge in legal matters that are expected to come out of the coronavirus pandemic and the likely economic fallout. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

One of the weirder things to come out of this whole pandemic will be the unanswered question “Is the governor’s nipple pierced?” No one is shaming the governor, I think we all need something to distract us from the state of the world for a few moments. (Jelisa Castrodale for Vice)

Sanra Lee, his ex-girlfriend, took to Instagram to talk about it and while she didn’t say they were pierced, she didn’t deny it either. (Charlie Nash for Mediaite)

Queens’ demographics may be the reason why it has become the epicenter of the city’s coronavirus outbreak. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

The city released hard numbers of positive COVID-19 cases per zip code, exposing the tale of two cities as wealthy neighborhoods have rates at 44%, while lower-income zip codes have infection rates as high as 77%. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Imagine you move into a 600-square-foot Manhattan shoebox apartment and two days later the two of you are locked down together. (Anne McCarthy for HuffPost)

“I basically want to address the idiots out there, and you know who you are.” Watch Larry David’s COVID-19 PSA. (Devon Ivie for Vulture)

Spring break is canceled for public schools. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“During a crisis, cocktail hour can be almost any hour.” -Ine Garten, hero. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Representatives Carolyn B. Maloney and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have added their voices to the cause of ending the ban on blood donations from gay and bisexual men. (LIC Post)

The New York City burger delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Video: Lower Manhattan’s skyline from 1903 through today. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

In the state’s budget, which passed on Wednesday night, is the legalization of electric bikes and scooters in the state, allowing municipalities to regulate electric bikes. Electric scooters that travel up to 15 miles per hour are legalized. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Also in the budget is a new state campaign finance system, with public matching money for candidates who choose to participate and lower individual contribution limits. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Say farewell to legal weed in 2020. The state failed to put it in the budget last year. A good lesson in not procrastinating. (Rebecca C. Lewis, Amanda Luz Hanning Santiago for City and State)

What New York City looked like, including a startling infographic about daily deaths, during the 1918 flu pandemic. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

You can now call 311 to report physical distancing violations. Of the 289 complaints in Manhattan in the first three days of the week, the NYPD “took action” on 88 of those complaints. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

A man in the Bronx attempted suicide-by-NYPD after receiving a COVID-19 diagnosis. After multiple warnings, the NYPD shot the man in the stomach and is in stable condition at NYC Health & Hospitals/Jacobi. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Former Police Commissioner James O’Neill is returning to public service to be a senior advisor in charge of distributing medical equipment and protective gear to city hospitals. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

210 of Coney Island Hospital’s 317 beds are full of COVID-19 patients and the facility is low on staff, gear, and space, as each employee is being issued one masks every five days. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Mayor de Blasio waivered on closing down the city’s playgrounds, Governor Cuomo did not. All playgrounds, swing sets, basketball courts, and similar spaces are closed. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Mayor de Blasio continues to be a punching bag in the media and doesn’t help himself when his public wavering constantly ends with Governor Cuomo making difficult, but right, decisions. This Times piece starts with an anecdote about Mayor de Blasio walking in Prospect Park on the morning of April 1, which means he was driven from the Upper West Side to Park Slope just to walk in Prospect Park when Central Park is one mile away. (Ben Smith for NY Times)

Love to color? Here are a few free coloring books from NYC artists. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!