The Briefly for June 22, 2020 – The “An Answer to Our Collective Fireworks Question” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NYC starts reopening phase two, Tuesday is primary day, the only true New Yorker, an NYPD cop uses an illegal chokehold, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

A boy caught a 20-pound catfish in Central Park using a bagel as bait. When we have conversations about who is a “real” New Yorker, this catfish deserves to be a part of the conversation. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Tuesday is a 2020 primary in New York for much more than the Democratic presidential nominee. Here’s your guide to the local races. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you applied for an absentee ballot and it hasn’t arrived, here’s what to do. (Brigid Gergin for Gothamist)

This weekend was the breaking point based on everyone in the city going to Twitter to complain about fireworks. Firework complaints are up 230x in June. What the hell is going on? (Sydney Pereira, Beth Fertig, David Cruz, Jake Dobkin, and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Believe it or not, there’s a real answer to what the hell is going on. According to Dave Hill, all of the fireworks shows in the Northeast have been canceled and fireworks vendors are up to their ears in pro-grade fireworks. Thanks to supply and demand, dealers have turned to the black market and are trying to unload their fireworks for any price. (@DaveHill77)

“Everywhere I go it smells the same, and it smells like my breath.” Let’s check-in with David Sedaris. (Sarah Lyall for NY Times)

A guide to phase two’s reopening. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Phase two means something big: Offices are open once more. If companies decide to reopen their offices? That’s a different story. (Michael Gold and Troy Closson for NY Times)

A 1.9-acre waterfront park and small beach is coming to the Bushwick Inlet Park, which was approved by the Parks and Waterfront Committee of Brooklyn’s Community Board 1. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Looking for a piece of history off the beaten path? Check out Jackie Robinson’s house on Tilden Ave. (Untapped New York for Michelle Young)

After 96 days, Governor Cuomo’s daily press conferences have come to an end. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

Half of New York’s working-class immigrants have lost their jobs as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to a new study by the Center for Urban Future. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

How many days has it been since the passing of the Eric Garner Chokehold Ban? An NYPD officer was suspended without pay after being caught on video using an illegal chokehold on an unarmed Black man in Queens. (Mark Hallum and Zach Gewelb for amNewYork Metro)

86.4% of tickets for biking on the sidewalk in 2018 and 2019 went to Black and Hispanic New Yorkers, even though they comprise only 49 percent of cyclists. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Dominique Alexander was found hanging from a tree last week in Fort Tryon Park in Manhattan, his death was ruled a suicide. Alexander’s death is one of many deaths of Black men that have been ruled a suicide after being found hanging from trees. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There were reports of three nooses being hung in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx on Juneteenth. The NYPD declined to open an investigation, claiming the ropes were nothing more than harmless string. This is the second investigation into a noose left in a city park that the NYPD has refused or closed without a thorough investigation. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Vincent D’Andraia, the cop that was suspended for showing a protester to the ground and was charged with misdemeanor assault has a history of 11 allegations of misconduct since 2015. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Students at predominantly Black New York City schools are significantly less likely to have a positive view of school police or to believe school discipline is applied fairly. If that’s your assumption, there’s a new study that confirms your assumption. (Jessica Gould, Alex Zimmerman, and Gabrielle LaMarr LeMee and Gothamist)

New York City’s education oversight board is calling for public schools, not the police, to manage the officers stationed on city campuses. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

“The Case for Self-Enforcing Streets” from Transportation Alternatives argues that the NYPD should be removed from traffic enforcement, calling for an expansion in enforcement technology, changing how crash investigations work, and more. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Hundreds of protesters marched on Astoria Blvd in Queens demanding the removal of the Christopher Columbus statue. (Angélica Acevedo for amNewYork Metro)

The American Museum of Natural History expressed plans to have the statue of Theodore Roosevelt removed from its entrance on Central Park West for its racist depictions of Native American and African figures. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

While we’re talking about statues, let’s encourage the Long Island town of Babylon to tear down their statue of Robert Moses. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

“Mayor de Blasio could have acted all along. He could have called for the NYPD to make officers’ disciplinary records public. He could have fired Officer Pantaleo immediately after he murdered Eric Garner. Mayor de Blasio knows how this all works, but benefits from the opaqueness that characterizes the political system in this city and state. He has amplified the problem with the system.”
-New Kings Democrats, Mayor de Blasio is neither progressive nor effective. He needs to resign

Juneteenth will become a city holiday in 2021. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

Photos: Juneteenth celebrations across the city. (Sophia Chang, photos by Angela Chalmondeley, Khaleeq Alfred, and Gretchen Robinette for Gothamist)

NYC Parks installed “Juneteenth Grove” at Cadman Plaza Park “in celebration of Juneteenth and to celebrate the homegoing of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and countless others.” (Mary Kim for Brooklyn Heights Blog)

Downtown Brooklyn and Park Slope are getting new bike lanes this summer on Smith St, Fourth Ave, and Navy Street. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Another week and another local racist caught on camera. This time it was in Flushing Queens where a man with a face mask pulled down yelled slurs at a South Korean student inside a 7-Eleven. The NYPD’s Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s been 63 years since the legendary brawl at the Copacabana that involved six hall of fame Yankees and their wives while celebrating Billy Martin’s birthday. Finally, the truth has come out. (David Margolick for NY Times)

The Yankees and Mets have announced that their, uh, “spring” training will be happening in New York and not Florida. (Priscila Korb for Patch)

Is wearing a mask getting in your way of drinking? Check out Crook & Marker’s TasteMask, which includes a flap for a straw. (Bao Ong for The Out)

Thanks to reader Hannah for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 26, 2020 – The “Summer of Cannibalistic Rats” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s gonna be a hot and wet summer, de Blasio sets the city’s thresholds for reopening, where to get frozen cocktails, Melinda Katz breaks a promise, & more

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 72˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, with 4/7 metrics met.

Here’s a beginner’s guide to biking to the beach, for the uninitiated. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

ConEd says the city should expect higher than usual electricity bills this summer in a combination of people being home more often and an increase in supply charges. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Also, this summer is predicted to unusually hotter and rainier than usual. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Why stop the bad news train now? This year’s hurricane season has been described as “brutal,” with double the number of hurricanes expected with six major storms and 19 named storms expected in total. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The bad news train keeps on rolling. The city’s rats have depended on the trash from restaurants for hundreds of generations, with restaurants either closed or producing much less food waste, rats are getting desperate and aggressive. They don’t pose a threat to humans but are turning on each other, turning to cannibalization. (Mariel Padilla for NY Times)

The city will be contacting you if you’ve had exposure using the same technology that Uber uses to text you that your driver is arriving. (Rachel Kraus for Mashable)

Queens DA Melinda Katz is breaking one of her campaign promises less than a year into office. While campaigning, Katz claimed she supported the legalization of sex work, but according to DecrimNY she has been targeting the buyers of sex work as part of her new Human Trafficking Bureau. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Errick Allen, an NYPD officer, was arrested on murder charges for fatally shooting his childhood friend in the head on Long Island. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re looking for a new apartment and pizza is your #1 priority, here are listings available near some of the city’s best pizzerias. (Localize.City)

As part of a new four-part plan to support nursing homes during the pandemic, the city will offer on-site COVID-19 testing to patients and staff at all 169 nursing homes across the city. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Every public school student in New York City will soon receive $420 to help pay for food while school buildings are shut down, regardless of family income. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

The NYPD’s enforcement of social distancing measures continues to hit black and brown New Yorkers hardest, according to new data gleaned by the Legal Aid Society. (Mark Hallum for Brooklyn Paper)

The city has opened up 45 miles of open streets in May, surprisingly exceeding its own goal for the month. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio set new thresholds for the city to begin reopening, separate from the state’s thresholds. Fewer than 200 daily hospitalizations, fewer than 375 patients in the ICU, and a positive testing rate below 15%, all for at least 10 to 14 days. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

It’s not the mayor’s decision on when the city reopens, as Governor Cuomo said in a press conference on Friday “it’s a statewide decision across the board.” The city’s guidelines, if met before the state’s, only serve to confuse. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

More than 100,000 small businesses have shut down permanently since the start of the pandemic, so the state is putting forward over $100 million towards a loan program for small businesses to help them amid the pandemic. Pre-applications start today. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Anybody who believes they have symptoms or who has been in contact with somebody who has tested positive is now urged to be tested for Covid-19. Here’s how to get tested. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

At this point it seems like people are expecting Councilmember Brad Lander and Mayor de Blasio to botch the Gowanus rezoning. With both leaving power in 2021, will they rush a poorly-thought plan through or will both of their legacies be an empty promise for the neighborhood? (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

New York will pay death benefits for essential government workers who lost their lives to novel coronavirus. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What is the “new normal?” No one knows yet, but it could look something like the wall of vending machines full of N95 masks on Delancey Street. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Swimming at the city’s beaches remains banned, but the City Council is working on guidelines to help open the city’s waters to swimmers. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Video: A walk through an empty Grand Central Terminal. (ActionKid)

The woman who started the #ClapForOurCarers at 7 pm says it’s time to stop. Annemarie Plas says that people have shown their appreciation and its time for people in power to reward them and give them the respect they deserve. Plas started the clapping in the UK, we’ll see if her calls for it to stop are heard across the Atlantic. (Derrick Bryson Taylor for NY Times)

Daci Zudi was riding his bike when he was hit and killed by Faustino Rebollar Garcia, driving his pickup truck. For the death of Zudi, Garcia was charged with failure to exercise due care and driving without a license, both minor charges. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

If you’ve got a soft spot for doughnuts, three Doughnut Plan locations have reopened. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The governor allowed religious gatherings of 10 or fewer people at the end of last week and was sued by the New York Civil Liberties Union, forcing the governor to change his executive order to allow non-essential gatherings of ten or fewer people across the state. The NYCLU seems to be pushing that responsibly distanced protests should be allowed, but it’s difficult to not see this being bused in other ways. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Where to get frozen cocktails. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The amazing story of Alice, the elephant who escaped from Coney Island and swam the five miles to Staten Island. She retired to the Bronx Zoo, which is a whole other story. (Thomas Hynes for Untapped New York)

20 Michelin-starred restaurants still open. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thank you to reader Ariana for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for January 3, 2020 – The “Your Choice of Subway Seat is Always Wrong” Edition

Today’s daily NY news digest: The weekend’s subway changes, sales in Trump buildings fall behind the rest of the city, revisiting Di Fara pizza, Manhattan’s hottest restaurants and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 49˚
Light rain until morning, starting again in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 52˚

Lance at Subway Weekender has retired his blog detailing the weekend’s subway delays. I’m working on either finding a replacement or doing this work myself. In the meantime, check the MTA’s giant list of everything happening to avoid being stranded by the trains this weekend.

Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero is modeled on a Swedish approach that views all deaths as preventable. If that’s the case why did the deaths of pedestrians, motorists, and cyclists increase in 2019? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

There’s an unlikely place to find the city’s history: postcards. (John Freeman Gill for NY Times)

What is the best subway seat? This meme lasted less than a day before de Blasio and Bloomberg ruined the fun. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The Times has the best answer. Your answer is obviously wrong. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

A record collection that rivals the one maintained by the Library of Congress sits in Tribeca needs a new home. (Derek K. Norman for NY Times)

David Hay, the deputy chief of staff to schools Chancellor Richard Carranza, was fired after he was arrested for allegedly trying to arrange sex with an underage boy online. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

Turns out David Hay, hired by the Department of Education, never received a completed background investigation. The Department of Investigation’s Background Investigation Unit has backlog of thousands of files. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

6 crucial ways New York City’s landscape will change in 2020. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Cardell Gadsden, a corrections officer from Rikers Island, was arrested after he allegedly murdered his uncle Steven Gadsden on the Upper West Side on Thursday. Gadsden was suspended without pay. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The 79th Street Boat Basin is the only spot in the city where houseboats can dock year-round. At the moment there’s room for 33 boats and there is a 14-year waitlist for a lease. The Department of Parks is planning a $90 million renovation to triple capacity with construction starting late 2021 or early 2022. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The city’s laws require employers to provide employees with lactation areas, but that doesn’t seem to matter to the NYPD, according to a new lawsuit. Five women are suing the NYPD for forcing them to pump breast-milk in rooms full of garbage bed bugs, their cars, and bathrooms. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Lasagna. Is this really going to be 2020’s food trend? We can survive anything after the 2019 horny chicken parm craze. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Video: Think you’ve got what it takes to keep up with a Rockette? You don’t. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Following a rash of anti-Semitic violence in recent weeks, Brooklyn elected officials are calling for dialogue and camaraderie between the borough’s black and Jewish populations. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Brooklyn House of Detention officially closed on Thursday. The remaining 390 detainees moved to other facilities, including Rikers Island. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Ok Kang, 70, is the first pedestrian in the city killed by a driver in 2020 on Northern Boulevard, the “New Boulevard of Death.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A man was caught on video literally trying to grab a sleeping woman on the subway and carry her off the train. The man, Sonny Alloway, was arrested and claims to have been attacked on the street multiple times since the video went public and offered $5,000 to anyone who attacked him if they can knock him out in a boxing match. For $5,000 I might consider giving it a try! (Brooklyn Baldwin for The Root)

The annoyances and adoration of Di Fara pizza. (Michael Fiorito for Red Hook Star-Revue)

All buses on the B44 SBS route are now equipped with the transit agency’s new Automated Bus Lane Enforcement system, issuing fines to cars caught illegally in the bus lane. Doesn’t it defeat the purpose of the system if the MTA announces that its use is limited to the B44, M14, and M15? (Scott Unman for Brooklyn Eagle)

The NY Post continues to be the NY Post. Offensive, exploitative, and I am 100% here for Gothamist shitting on the worst publication in the city. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

NY Yankees Pitcher Domingo German will miss 63 games after accepting a suspension for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend last September. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

NYC Ferry’s ridership was up by 32% in 2019. The increase includes the new Lower East Side and Soundview routes. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Farrell’s Bar and Grill is one of Brooklyn’s oldest bars, dating back to 1933. The biggest change might be the bar’s signature styrofoam cups gave way when the city banned them. Two Brooklynites are raising funds to produce a documentary about the bar that hasn’t changed despite the changes to the city around it. (Scott Unman for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Sales at Trump-branded condos continue to fall behind the rest of Manhattan. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The hottest restaurants in Manhattan, January 2020 edition. (Stefanie Tuder and Serena Dai for Eater)