The Briefly for December 6, 2019 – The “Your New Year’s Wishes Will Become Literal Trash” Weekend Edition

In today’s daily NYC digest: The weekend’s subway disruptions, coffee rat, Gambino family mobsters were caught for racketeering, the best unsing restaurants, and more

This weekend’s subways are a mess of fun, including a few suspensions. Better check before you go if you’re along the 4, 5, A, E, J, N, Q, and R trains. (Lance for Subway Weekender)

The owners of Luna Park in Coney Island are raising the rent on the independently owned businesses on the Riegelmann Boardwalk by 500% on January 1. On top of the rent, they also take 10% of the sales as well. It’s a greedy move by the largest lease-holder in Coney Island, who tried to evict all the businesses on the boardwalk in 2010. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The LinkNYC kiosks were supposed to by “a critical step toward a more equal, open, and connected city,” according to the mayor. Instead, they’re digital billboards, an additional form of surveillance, magnets for controversy, and of the 7,500 that were to be installed, only 1,774 are in operation. With less than 25% of the promised numbers actually delivered, they have done little to address the digital divide in the city. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

Spend a Sunday with Cheslie Kryst, Miss USA. (Tammy La Gorce for NY Times)

Your wishes for 2020 can become literal trash less than an hour into the new year. If you want to see your hopes and dreams end up in the sewer, you can submit a new year wish to be included on Times Square confetti in-person or online. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Is the MTA’s “Rockaway Parkway Station” an abbreviation or an amazing typo? (@clauirizarry)

Holiday windows in NYC you won’t want to miss. (Shaye Weaver for amNewYork)

Do you need to be reminded that fishing in the Gowanus Canal, a waterway whose water was nicknamed “Black Mayo,” is a bad idea? The answer is a surprising “yes,” because the city is adding more signs reminding people of the Superfund status of the canal. (Scott Unman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 421-a tax abatement program was meant to spur development and make home-owning less of a financial burden by temporarily lowering real estate tax bills, but that temporary financial relief is exactly that. Only temporary. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Real estate tax is tricky to begin with. On average Bronx and Staten Island homeowners have lower home values, but pay a higher percentage of the value of their homes compared to other boroughs. There are four classes of property that are all taxed differently and assessments vary. Reform is on the agenda for 2020. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

Meet Lauren Ashcraft, the 30-year-old democrat socialist challenging U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney for her seat in Congress. (Victoria Merlino for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“Jagged Little Pill” on Broadway is a Times Critic’s Pick. (Jesse Green for NY Times)

You might see headlines about how Di Fara Pizza will “deliver” its pizza for the first time. While it’s technically true, they are working with a company that ships food through the mail rather than locally. While it’s a fun gimmick to say that you can get a pizza from Di Fara “delivered” to your friend in Seattle, it’s also not the delivery you were looking for. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Who are the people clamoring for Blockbuster Video merchandise in 2019? Well, a pop-up on Soho is here for them to get their fix of a doomed business from the 90s. (Untapped New York)

The Sanitation Department have select the garbage cans of tomorrow, and they look like garbage cans. The cans of tomorrow will be seen on Fifth Ave near 90th St first before implemented more widely across the city. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A Target is coming to Times Square and it’s expected to open in 2022. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Kellogg’s NYC near Union Square, where for some reason you could get a bowl of cereal for $1.50, is closed. Miraculously, it was open for nearly two years. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Where to ice skate in the city. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s homeless relocation program has been under investigation since February for placing families in unsafe living conditions outside city limits. Newark is suing NYC in federal court for moving homeless families into Newark slums. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The NYPD has more tasers than ever, and it seems like they’re trigger-happy to use those tasers on people of color and the “emotionally disturbed” based on four years of complaints about improper use. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Today marks the release of the third season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. What would her classic-six apartment on Riverside Drive be worth today? (Emily McDonald for StreetEasy)

The filming locations of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: The Dyker Heights Christmas lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An explosion at an Amtrak facility in the Bronx has left one person dead and two people with minor injuries, according to the FDNY. (Elizabeth Kim and Andy Mai for Gothamist)

Congrats to everyone who posted photos of a viral milkshake to Instagram, you’ve participated in the dumbest food trend of the decade. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Okay, so now Coffee Rat is now a thing. Great. (Ben Kayas for Gothamist)

Are there still Gambino mobsters out there? Yes, because 12 of them, including their boss Andrew Campos, were arrested on racketeering and loan sharking charges on Thursday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Are you one of the 50,000 whose late fees to the New York Public Library were referred to a collections agency? (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Take a deep breath. There have been no reported Mandarin Duck sightings in a while and some pessimists have feared the worst. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Under their new contract, bus and subway workers would get a roughly 10% raise over the next four years. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Great New Year’s Eve restaurants that don’t require a tasting menu. (The Infatuation)

The ten best unsung restaurants from the Times’ Hungry City columnist. (Ligaya Michan for NY Times)

The Briefly for December 4, 2019 – The “Another Reason Not to Eat Sushi From Walgreens” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio says a new stupid thing, the most popular dog names in the city, a french fry shortage is on the horizon, the Rock Center tree, and more.

The city won’t reveal its master plan for the Sunnyside Yards at a traditional town hall meeting, instead favoring a digital town hall, requiring participants to register in advance. Does the EDC expect a massive turnout and couldn’t find an appropriate space or are they trying to suppress opposition to their plan? (Michael Dorgan and Christian Murray for LIC Post)

If you’re the Governors Ball-going type, tickets are available for presale and they’re dropping hints about the lineup on Instagram. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

There’s a recall of ready-to-eat sushi, salads, and spring rolls from Trader Joe’s and Walgreens due to a contamination of Listeria. Trader Joe’s has reported no illnesses and if you have contaminated food you can bring it back for a refund. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Is Hurricane Dorian going to cause a french fry shortage? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A cargo delivery bike pilot program will be announced today with Amazon, DHL, and Whole Foods among its participants. The bikes look to be part truck and part bike, but will take up a much smaller footprint in regards to carbon and parking. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More info on the cargo bikes: They’ll be big, but also pedal assisted, allowed in commercial loading spaces, and will be concentrated from 60th to the Battery. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Hang for NY Times)

The process to make Rikers Island a public space kicked off this week to make way for the jail’s closing in 2026. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall is getting a $550 million remodel. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Has Mayor de Blasio’s control over the city’s schools been effective? The state Assembly will hold a hearing on the 16th. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s coming to Off-Broadway this December. (Matt Windman for amNewYork)

Vending machines like the CVS machines in Union Square and Chambers St station is both a new and nearly 120 year old idea. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A holiday tipping guide: How much to tip your doorman, super, porter, and more. (Brick Underground)

New York spends the most per student than any other state in the country and has the 13th lowest graduation rate. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Quickly: What’s the different between hemp and marijuana? The Brooklyn District Attorney’s office doesn’t know either. Earlier this year they boasted about stopping 106 pounds of marijuana from hitting the streets, but it was hemp, and they arrested Oren Levy from Green Angel CBD under the same assumption. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’ll be easier to prove tenant harassment from landlords thanks to new bills signed into law by Governor Cuomo. The laws expand the definition of harassment, remove the requirement that tenants prove they’ve been physically hurt by their landlords, and increases punishment for landlords who try to force out rent-regulated tenants. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Rockefeller enter Christmas tree. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

New Yorkers pride themselves on knowing the best alternatives. The best delis that aren’t Katz, the best pizza in DUMBO that isn’t from Grimaldi’s, the best food that isn’t outside your neighborhood, etc. Here are 20 Christmas trees that aren’t in Rockefeller Center. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A new public light installation at Brookfield Place called Light Up Luminaries creates a canopy of multi-colored, lit up cubes suspended from the ceiling with a “show” every hour. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Lord & Taylor is returning to the city for two weeks in December in the form of a 2,400 square foot pop-up shop in Soho, a far cry from their 676,000 square foot Fifth Avenue flagship location that was shuttered at the beginning of the year. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The NYPD has been shooting surveillance films of “individuals and enemies of the state” for decades and thanks to the Handschu agreement, over a hundred hours of digitized footage from the 1960s through the 1980s is available through the Department of Records & Information Services. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The laws passed on Tuesday are only the start of what advocates hope will be a fruitful 2020 session when it comes to rent reforms. Multiple bills addressing evictions, tenant protections and housing stability are still in-process in Albany. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork)

The mayor is venturing towards full-on idiot mode with every passing day. When asked if the NYPD should be allowed to publicly display Thin Blue Line flags on NYPD property, the mayor said “There’s a lot of Photoshop in this world, so we’ll see.” The Thin Blue Line flag has been adopted by neo-Nazis and white supremacists in response to the Black Lives Matter movement. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

40 inexpensive dining destinations. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New Yorkers speak 637 languages, and the Endangered Language Alliance has mapped them all. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Let’s start with the obvious, we did not arrest Wolverine.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

How much did your school’s PTA bring in last year? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

The most popular dog names in the city and Max and Bella. You’ve gotta step up your dog naming game. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden is offering free admission Tuesday to Friday, noon to 4:30pm. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

At least five Rikers Island correction officers have been suspended as investigators examine their failure to stop an 18-year-old detainee’s suicide attempt. (Ed Shanahan and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Where to go when you’ve eaten everywhere in Williamsburg. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for December 3, 2019 – The “Jet Engine Powered Snow Blowers” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest with standing up to big real estate, the best restaurants in Crown Heights, an NYPD cop walking into a queer dance night with a Trump lanyard, and more.

A truly amazing interactive history of today’s subway map, including the history of the map, its digitization and you may learn a few things along the journey. (Antonio de Luca and Sasha Portis for NY Times)

Bill de Blasio is having an immature fit about Mike Bloomberg’s presidential run. Is it jealousy that Bloomberg’s campaign is more successful than de Blasio’s could ever hope to be or is it that de Blasio has always been petty and petulent when it comes to his predecessor? (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

How does the MTA deal with snowstorms? Jet engine powered snow blowers. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Imagine going to see Slave Play on Broadway to interrupt a Q&A session to complain that the playwright is “racist against white people.” Say hello to Talkback Tammy. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

This was the year that New York state and city government stood up to big real estate interests and made appreciable change. The real estate industry is looking for new ways to influence governmental decisions moving forward. (John Leland for NY Times)

The best restaurants in Crown Heights. (The Infatuation)

The NRA is challenging a city law that was aimed at stopping interstate gun trafficking in the Supreme Court. A decision isn’t expected until June. (Amanda Eisenberg for Politico)

Remember last year’s HOLLAND TONNEL Christmas decoration OCD nightmare? This year’s decorations are much less cringe-worthy. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

Welcome to the Dermot Shea era of the NYPD. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Have you had a package mysteriously disappear from your building? You’re not alone. 90,000 packages go missing every day. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Haag for NY Times)

The “Brooklyn’s Fyre Festival” nightmare is never-ending. Arch-villain and architect of the Frozen Fare Festival Lena Romanova is suing the Brooklyn Daily Eagle for defamation for its coverage of Winterfest, the winter shitshow to end all winter shitshows at the Brooklyn Museum one year ago. Winterfest is, thankfully, never coming back. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An NYPD officer walked into a queer dance night in Jackson Heights for an inspection wearing a Trump lanyard on Sunday. Officers are required to remain politically neutral and as a result their commander is investigating the inspection. (Max Parrott for QNS)

The homes in Ozone Park that were flooded with the city’s raw sewage have been pumped from the basements and officials are blaming the backup on a possible “Fatberg.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Stay ho ho home. SantaCon is coming. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

10 new public art installations to see this month. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: The Empire State Building’s new $165 million 80th floor observatory is open. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A first look at the new Rockefeller Center pedestrian zones. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The York Street F-line station may be one of the city’s most potentially dangerous. The station serves 14,000 workers and 4,000 residents who travel through the station’s single stairwell with no escalator, elevator, or second exit. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

CitiBike’s pedal assisted electric bikes are coming back “this winter,” breaking the promise for a fall return. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The Eater 38, 38 restaurants that define New York City’s dining scene right now, has been updated with Williamsburg’s Gertie making the list. (Eater)