The Briefly for May 30, 2019 – The “I Don’t Have to Talk to You” Edition

Transgender activists will get a monument, a prison may become luxury apartments, this week’s commute from hell, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city is getting safer, but pockets of Brooklyn are seeing spikes in violence. Is gang activity to blame? (NY Times)

“I don’t have to talk to you.” Why did Brooklyn Community Board 1 buy that $26,000 SUV? It doesn’t matter, because now the story is about Community Board 1’s district manager Gerald Esposito’s outburst when questioned about it at a board meeting this week. (The City)

One of the benefits of going to school at NYU is that you also get to live in one of the country’s most expensive rental markets. Oh what, that’s not a benefit. (Patch)

The Staten Island Wheel is the city’s zombie project. Now that it’s been dead for months, the city’s Economic Development Corporation is meeting with a new developer to work on the 630 foot tall Ferris wheel. (6sqft)

Electric scooters are still illegal, but rent-by-the-minute mopeds have arrived in Long Island City, Astoria, and multiple Brooklyn neighborhoods. (LIC Post)

We have the mayor mayor, the night mayor, and soon we may have the bike mayor. (Streetsblog)

If you’re a fan of events like The Squirrel Census, the Great Fish Count is looking for volunteers across the city. (6sqft)

Is this pole dancing rat the work of the enigmatic Zardulu? (Gothamist)

More on Zardulu. (Reply All)

In a move that seems too perfect for the nightmare dystopia the city’s real estate has become, a former prison in Harlem may soon become a series of luxury apartments. (The Root)

A guide to the city’s only observation decks. An easy guide because it comprises of all of them. (Curbed)

The “mechanical void” loophole has officially been closed by the city council. The short version of it was that developers were adding mechanical space in the middle of buildings to get around zoning laws to make the upper floors of their buildings as high as possible. (Curbed)

Three men were found guilty of “a sort of insurance fraud on steroids” that made them $31 million richer until they were caught. (Gothamist)

This week’s commuting hell belongs to 79th St, where the MTA closed all but one exit, causing overcrowding and five trainloads of people unable to leave the station. (Gothamist)

A few weeks after City Hall transferred city-owned land in the Bronx to a developer and approved $12 million in financing for an affordable apartment complex, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s political action committee received a $25,000 donation. (The City)

Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, pioneering transgender activists who were at the vanguard of the gay rights movement, will be immortalized in a monument that may be placed down the street from the Stonewall Inn. (NY Times)

Netflix’s mini-series on the Central Park Five is released on Friday, and with it will bring a flood of stories about the men at the center of the controversy and how they were targeted, hated, and abused by the city they called home and more specifically Donald Trump. (NY Times)

First, it was Trader Joe’s and now Whole Foods is following suit. 8 of the city’s 12 Whole Foods will stop making deliveries outside of what they refer to as the “walking zone” near their stores and are pushing customers to otherwise use Amazon’s ‘Prime Now’ app instead of visiting the store at all. (Tribeca Citizen)

Where to eat, but mostly where to avoid, at Hudson Yards. (Eater)

Governor Cuomo does not have any plans to lighten his grip on the state and just started his third term. He announced plans to run for a fourth term in office. The last governor of New York to serve four complete terms was George Clinton, New York’s very first governor in 1777. (Patch)

Katz’s is having a ‘When Harry Met Sally’ fake orgasm contest on the 30th anniversary of the film’s release. If you’ve been training for this your whole life, this is your moment. (Eater)

40 ideas for a birthday party for an adult. Calling it an “adult birthday party” sounds like it involves pornography. (Grub Street)

Can we have one week without someone intentionally trying to sabotage the subways? (Gothamist)

Tourism is up in the city and has taken Broadway’s box offices with it. 2018 was the ninth straight year of growth in the number of tourists, who make up 63% of the total 14,768,254 people attending Broadway shows, paying $1.8 billion for tickets. Other factors in Broadway’s growth include longer running shows, a wider variety of shows and a higher volume of them as well. And Hamilton, which grossed $165 million in ticket sales. (NY Times)

Infinity in a Tiny Room is an art show that takes place in an apartment, and no, this is not in Bushwick. (Patch)

The best Thai restaurants in New York. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for May 28, 2019 – The “Anatomy of an Everything Bagel” Edition

Not even Mayor de Blasio’s fundraisers want him to be president, the NYC Ferry was a disaster over the weekend, the 2021 election is going to be wild, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes are minimal but hit the 1, 2, 4, 6, and A trains. (Subway Weekender)

In exchange for a weekend of pretty killer weather, we’re in for quite a bit of rain this week. (amNY)

An in-depth, detailed analysis of Grand Central Terminal’s architecture and design. (Viewing NYC)

The newest NYC restaurants, including a new restaurant in the West Village from the 2019 James Beard award winner for best NYC chef. (amNY)

The “everything” on an everything bagel: poppy, sesame, caraway, garlic, onion, and sea salt. That and the rest of the bagel recipe. (amNY)

The Bushwick Book Club is pretty much everything you’d imagine a Bushwick acid trip dream of a book club might be. (Bushwick Daily)

All 3,000 NYCHA elevators are out of service, on average, at least once each month and the average outage has doubled in length in recent years. The NYCHA has 10 inspectors to cover 3,000 elevators. (The Real Deal)

Rents have increased near 314 subway stations, with the Classon Ave stop on the G, Simpson St on the 25 and Bergen St on the 2/3 coming out on top. (Patch)

Queen Andrea’s work on the Bowery Mural Wall started over the weekend. her bright colors and typography work is already coming through. (EV Grieve)

A robbery suspect jumped off the FDR off-ramp to evade police but ended up dying from his injuries. (Gothamist)

Will a boozy Taco Bell ruin Chelsea? So far, there have been no complaints. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio counts being irritating to President Trump as a positive quality. The president isn’t the only person that finds him irritating. (Politico)

Delia’s is back, JNCOs are on their way back, Jagged Little Pill is on Broadway, and McMansions haven’t died yet. (the Real Deal)

Who is the genius that didn’t think to expand the NYC Ferry options for Memorial Day weekend, the first big beach weekend of the year? Whoever it was, they should be fired. (Pix 11)

How pervasive has Airbnb become in the city? This visualization showing growth over the last eleven years should be enlightening. (r/dataisbeautiful / Imap14)

Who wants the mayor to be president? We already know about the amazing 76% of New Yorkers polled that said no. His friends said no. What about the people who gave $5,000 to his political action committee? The New York Times asked 35 of those people and only five said yes. (NY Times)

The 2021 city election is going to be a wild one. Most of the city council, the mayor, all borough presidents, and comptroller will be hitting term-limits, and over 500 candidates are expected to step up in the process. (Gotham Gazette)

In order to avoid looking like tourists, we keep our heads down, focusing on the slow walking people in front of us. Occasionally it pays to look up, or else we’ll miss details like the sea-horses above 25 Broadway, part of Steamship Row. (Forgotten New York)

Where to drink when you want to learn about wine. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 23, 2019 – The “Who is the Super-villain Destroying Our Commutes?” Edition

Gentrifying neighborhoods belong to rats, the NYPD adds nearly 300 officers to the streets, everyone hates Bill De Blasio and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The story of a community response that saved Prospect Heights’ Ode to Babel bar from becoming a victim of the NIMBY-ism that comes with gentrification. (Grub Street)

It all started with the arrest of Michael Cohen. A look behind the scenes at the full year and 450 interviews from The New York Times‘ investigation into how taxi medallions ever became worth $1 million. (NY Times)

Who is the city’s supervillain pulling emergency brakes on subways and destroying our commutes? Whoever it is, they’ve been doing it for months, and possibly tears, without getting caught. (Jalopnik)

Here’s how the NYC Care Card works and what it does and does not entitle you to. (Norwood News)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is testing her political capital with an endorsement of Tiffany Cabán for Queens District Attorney, who also received endorsements from the Democratic Socialists of America, Real Justice PAC, and the Working Families Party. The primary is June 25. (NY Times)

Eight is great… unless that’s the percent of people polled who have a favorable opinion of you. Mayor de Blasio’s national favorability rating is below the president’s and the worst among anyone running for president. (Patch)

One thing that gentrification brings to a neighborhood? Rats. You may have read about the block in Prospect Heights where the rats have basically taken over, but it’s becoming a trend across the city. As more buildings have construction done, it displaces rats by destroying their burrows, forcing them to come to the surface. (NY Times)

A guide to the OMNY, which starts its slow takeover of MetroCards in 8 short days. (Curbed)

New York City is last on the list of popular destinations for retirees to live. About 15,000 seniors moved out of the city from 2016 to 2017. The top places are, unsurprisingly, Florida and Arizona. (Patch)

Video: Here’s how you can help to compost with food scrap drop-offs. (Viewing NYC)

A city council proposal to exempt yellow cabs from congestion pricing is short-sighted and foolish, according to experts. Politicians are blaming the fees for a declining number of rides and not a combination of continued congestion on the roads and app-based alternatives that make yellow cabs less desirable. (Streetsblog)

Don’t look now, but there are more vegan options in the city than ever and chefs are working to lure unsuspecting non-vegans to the dark side. Even fast food chains like Burger King and Taco Bell are getting onboard with plant-based options. (amNY)

The city’s news moves pretty fast. Blink and you’ll miss the rest of the story. What multiple people thought was a woman dressed as a character from “The Handmaid’s Tale” on the verge of committing suicide turned out to be a folded up red umbrella. (Gothamist)

Congrats to Washington Heights’ Maelyn Jarmon for winning season 16 of The Voice. (amNY)

Everything you need to know about raising chickens in NYC. (6sqft)

It’s time to take a look at President Trump’s tax returns. A bill passed the state’s legislature on Wednesday that would allow the state to hand the President’s state tax returns to Congress. The governor has voiced support in the past and is expected to sign the bill shortly. (Patch)

Google purchased another building in Chelsea to expand its footprint and keep on target to double the number of employees in its New York offices in the next ten years. (amNY)

The “LGBT in 2021” campaign is aimed at getting better LGBTQ representation into the City Council. (amNY)

All five borough presidents joined over 70 early childhood providers and Comptroller Scott Stringer in calling on the city to scrap its plans for pre-K and early childhood programs and start over saying the current plan would weaken the city’s social safety net and hinder community-based organizations to provide early education programming. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The “Summer All-Out” program will send almost 300 additional NYPD officers to high-crime areas in an attempt to reduce homicides and violent crimes. (amNY)

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