The Briefly for August 30, 2019 – The “Celebrations Have Already Begun” Labor Day Weekend Edition

Holiday weekend subway changes, closed streets for J’Ouvert and West Indian Day Carnival, bringing a dead squirrel on the subway, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The first Labor Day celebration took place in Manhattan 130 years ago. (amNY)

Street closings and timings for this year’s J’Ouvert festival and West Indian American Day Carnival. (Curbed)

This weekend is the last big weekend for the Hailstone icehouse in Crown Heights, as they sell ice like it’s going out of style, 40 pounds at a time. (NY Times)

What’s open and closed for Labor Day weekend. (Patch)

This weekend’s weather is looking pretty comfortable. (amNY)

The change from L train shutdown to slowdown is nearly doubling the project’s cost. (Curbed)

Step inside of Sweet Afton and you’ll feel like you’re inside a Wes Anderson movie. It wouldn’t be far from the truth, because the bar’s redesign was put together by Kris Moran, set designer for Moonrise Kingdom. (Time Out)

NYCHA General Manager Vito Mustaciuolo is under investigation for harassment. An expose in the Daily News outlined his misbehavior. The NYCHA hasn’t said if he will continue working full-time while the investigation proceeds. (Patch)

It’s that time of year again: New York Fashion Week starts next weekend. (amNY)

Squirrels can be cute, but bringing a dead squirrel onto the subway is not cute. (Patch)

A look at the rejected ballots from the Katz/Cabán primary in Queens and how easily Katz’s 55-vote lead could have been easily erased. (The Indypendent)

Put Stan Lee on New York’s new license plate, you cowards! (Bronx Times)

A preview of Portal: Governors Island, an art fair which opens on Governors Island this Saturday. (Gothamist)

Where to eat and shop in Hell’s Kitchen. (amNY)

The five-day celebration of J’Ouvert has already begun. (Street Easy)

Brooklyn’s first Chick-fil-A is accused of trying to poach workers from local businesses. (Patch)

The City Council is being accused of trying to bury a public meeting about the plan to replace Rikers Island with four “community” jails by scheduling it on the hectic first day of school. (Queens Eagle)

The number of city classrooms with lead-paint hazards has doubled after a set of inspections, bringing the number to 1,858. The city says all the affected classrooms will be ready for Thursday’s first day of school. The Department of Education is supposed to inspect each classroom annually. (Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has failed to qualify for the next round of Democratic presidential debates in September. The mayor has already said he didn’t plan on dropping out of the race if he didn’t qualify. Mayor, what is so wrong with the city that you lead that you’d prefer to spend this much time away from it? (Patch)

Despite the law signed by Governor Cuomo last week barring them from state waters, the company floating billboards around Manhattan and Brooklyn’s shoreline continues to do so after finding a loophole in the language used in the law. The state has not enforced the new law with any citations. (Gothamist)

The case against Jeffrey Epstein was officially closed by a Manhattan federal judge. (Patch)

One of the hidden gems of the garment district is Acuario Cafe. How can you find it? There no signs and you can only find by walking through a freight elevator of an office building on 37th St. (Viewing NYC)

Do you know about the IFC’s secret peephole? (Bedford + Bowery)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge bike lanes make riding across the bridge easy. Getting to the bridge on a bike? Much more difficult. (amNY)

Two former NYPD Detectives who were initially accused of raping an 18-year-old woman in their custody have pleaded guilty to receiving a bribe and “official misconduct” for having sex with a teenager inside a police van after a traffic stop in Coney Island, and will only serve five years of probation. (Gothamist)

16 fantastic Filipino restaurants. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 21, 2019 – The “Bragging About Being Better Than Queens” Edition

Two Proud Boys are convicted, Cuomo bans floating billboards, the city’s secret waterfalls, the Ritz-Carlton penthouse is for sale, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

What are your neighbors complaining about the most? (The Real Deal)

The latest exhibit at the Transit Museum focuses on the history of subway signs. (Untapped Cities)

Have you been indoctrinated into the cult of cauliflower gnocchi? (Grub Street)

Nothing is as Brooklyn as bragging about being better than Queens. (Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: The abandoned Miller Air Field in Staten Island. (Untapped Cities)

Manero’s Pizza has stepped into the city’s pizza battles with a hybrid New York/Neapolitan slice. (Grub Street)

It’s not a pre-snowstorm run on food, this disaster is the modern-day Dean & Deluca’s. (Eater)

A guide to $1 happy hour oysters, the holy grail, in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The safest neighborhoods in the city. (StreeyEasy)

Wayla vs Wayan vs Wayo. Getting the restaurant names straight in the city isn’t as always simple. (Eater)

Following the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, activists have named five additional officers who they say should be fired for their connection to the death of Eric Garner. (Politico)

New York joined the lawsuit against the federal government over the finalized changes to the “public charge” rule, which will deny citizenship, visas, and green cards to immigrants enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (amNY)

July was the tenth hottest month in NYC history. (Gothamist)

Where to find the city’s secret waterfalls. (6sqft)

Not on the list is the Marcy Houses, where tenants were battling a waterfall in their stairwell due to a burst pipe. (Patch)

The mayor has claimed victory in reforming the NYPD, but the reality isn’t as simple. (Gotham Gazette)

The AirTrain to JFK will be increasing in price from $5 to $7.75 starting November 1. (Second Ave Sagas)

The digital billboards that have been floating around Manhattan are illegal as of Monday, when Governor Cuomo signed a bill to law making them immediately illegal. The company behind the billboards has vowed to find a new loophole to continue their annoying goal of making sure New Yorkers are always looking at advertising somewhere. (NY Times)

Everyone is prone to make real estate mistakes, but not everyone writes an essay for Domino Magazine about it, but then again Lena Dunham isn’t everyone. (Domino)

Vendors could be banned from the Dyker Heights Christmas lights displays this year because of the volume of trash visitors left lying around in previous years. New Yorkers are renown for disposing of their garbage anywhere they’d like, and a neighborhood that’s residential through most of the year isn’t meant to hold the trash of 150,000 visitors. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed to address the homelessness crisis in his last mayoral campaign, but critics say his plans are falling short. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo signed the “Deed Theft Bill” into law, which provides greater protections for owners of homes that are in default or foreclosure. (Kings County Politics)

Does the opening of the Brooklyn Grange, the city’s largest rooftop farm, signal a real change for the city? (Brooklyn Based)

Maxwell Hare, 27, and John Kinsman, 39, guilty of attempted gang assault, attempted assault, and rioting as part of the Proud Boys fight on the Upper East Side in October of last year. They’ll be sentenced in October and face up to 15 years in prison. (Gothamist)

The best new restaurants on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The ultimate guide to renting in NYC. (Curbed)

If you’ve got $49 million and a burning desire to live in the Ritz-Carlton’s penthouse, I’ve got an apartment to sell you. (The Real Deal)

The PlayStation Theater in Times Square will be closing January 1. The last shows at the theater will be a four-night run by the Disco Biscuits. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Nike York City? The city agreed to license its logo and a few dozen other ephemera to Nike to print them on its merchandise. Does anyone want an NYPD Bomb Squad sneaker? (Patch)

Here are the companies in NYC with the fastest revenue growth. (Patch)

Whatever a “classic NYC experience” is, amNY has a list of restaurants where you can still experience it. (amNY)

The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

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