The Briefly for October 9, 2019 – The “I Hope Someone Burns It Down” Edition

Alec Baldwin was scammed and the mayor is taking action, $10 million of speeding tickets in Queens, Brooklyn’s best fried chicken sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The pre-Yom Kippur Jewish tradition of “transferring” your sins to a live chicken by swinging it over your head is called kaporos. It’s a barbaric and disgusting tradition that kills thousands of chickens in the streets of Crown Heights. You’ll find people saying if you oppose the tradition you’re anti-Semitic or you’re doing the same thing to the Jewish community that Russia or Germany did by callnig for an end to the tradition. Public streets are not the place for slaughtering animals in 2019. (Gothamist)

The 2019 Miss Subways has been crowned. Congratulations are in order to Ms. Dylan Greenberg, this year’s Miss Subways. (NY Times)

One of this year’s election questions is about ranked-choice voting, here’s an explainer on what it is and a little bit on why it’s a good thing. (amNY)

A community hearing about a homeless shelter in Glendale, Queens started with a moment of silence for the homeless men murdered in Chinatown and then quickly devolved into comments like “I hope someone burns it down,” and “They should be locked away forever.” (Gothamist)

Today’s the day for all working New Yorkers have to have completed sexual harassment training at work. The law was passing in April and gave all New York state employers about six months to have it done. The state senate hasn’t had their training yet. (Politico)

The city revitalized 54-acres of wetlands on Staten Island, with the goal for the first phase being 69 acres. Nice. (Curbed)

Video: A look at the history of tattoos in NYC, which were illegal for nearly 40 years. (Viewing NYC)

The most expensive apartment in the Bronx is on sale for $4.6 Million. (Welcome2TheBronx)

NYC has seen its first vaping death. (Patch)

It’s not only mind-boggling that there are 32 pairs of bus stops less than 260 feet away from each other, but it slows down the routes to have stops that close. (6sqft)

Drivers in Queens racked up over $10 million in speed camera violations in six weeks of the program giving $50 tickets for going more than 10 miles an hour over the speed limit in a school zone. Queens accounts for more than 1/3 of the $28 million total. (LIC Post)

Skunks are common in the city, but for the first time, one has been spotted in Prospect Park. They’re harmless as long as you don’t threaten them, so welcome to our new fuzzy and sometimes stinky park-dwellers. (Patch)

Take a ride in the new Cash Cab. (amNY)

The company operating floating billboards has finally left the city, after the city and state both passed laws making their type of floating billboards illegal. (Patch)

In the dumbest series of events that lead to something good, Alec Baldwin was scammed by the guys selling tickets to boat tours of the Statue of Liberty around Battery Park and Tuesday the mayor said the city will crack down on this type of ticketing scam. If you want to go to the statue, tickets are sold in front of Castle Clinton and on the Statue Cruises website. (NY Times)

What kind of punishment would you assume killing a 10-year-old with a car while driving without a license carries? If you said “a misdemeanor with a maximum punishment of 30 days in jail,” you’re right. (Streetsblog)

Netflix is turning Broadway’s Belasco Theatre into a movie theater to show Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman for the month of November. (Time Out)

A review of Mario Batali’s biggest NYC restaurants in a post-Batali world. (Eater)

The 10 best fried chicken sandwiches in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Briefly for August 30, 2019 – The “Celebrations Have Already Begun” Labor Day Weekend Edition

Holiday weekend subway changes, closed streets for J’Ouvert and West Indian Day Carnival, bringing a dead squirrel on the subway, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The first Labor Day celebration took place in Manhattan 130 years ago. (amNY)

Street closings and timings for this year’s J’Ouvert festival and West Indian American Day Carnival. (Curbed)

This weekend is the last big weekend for the Hailstone icehouse in Crown Heights, as they sell ice like it’s going out of style, 40 pounds at a time. (NY Times)

What’s open and closed for Labor Day weekend. (Patch)

This weekend’s weather is looking pretty comfortable. (amNY)

The change from L train shutdown to slowdown is nearly doubling the project’s cost. (Curbed)

Step inside of Sweet Afton and you’ll feel like you’re inside a Wes Anderson movie. It wouldn’t be far from the truth, because the bar’s redesign was put together by Kris Moran, set designer for Moonrise Kingdom. (Time Out)

NYCHA General Manager Vito Mustaciuolo is under investigation for harassment. An expose in the Daily News outlined his misbehavior. The NYCHA hasn’t said if he will continue working full-time while the investigation proceeds. (Patch)

It’s that time of year again: New York Fashion Week starts next weekend. (amNY)

Squirrels can be cute, but bringing a dead squirrel onto the subway is not cute. (Patch)

A look at the rejected ballots from the Katz/Cabán primary in Queens and how easily Katz’s 55-vote lead could have been easily erased. (The Indypendent)

Put Stan Lee on New York’s new license plate, you cowards! (Bronx Times)

A preview of Portal: Governors Island, an art fair which opens on Governors Island this Saturday. (Gothamist)

Where to eat and shop in Hell’s Kitchen. (amNY)

The five-day celebration of J’Ouvert has already begun. (Street Easy)

Brooklyn’s first Chick-fil-A is accused of trying to poach workers from local businesses. (Patch)

The City Council is being accused of trying to bury a public meeting about the plan to replace Rikers Island with four “community” jails by scheduling it on the hectic first day of school. (Queens Eagle)

The number of city classrooms with lead-paint hazards has doubled after a set of inspections, bringing the number to 1,858. The city says all the affected classrooms will be ready for Thursday’s first day of school. The Department of Education is supposed to inspect each classroom annually. (Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has failed to qualify for the next round of Democratic presidential debates in September. The mayor has already said he didn’t plan on dropping out of the race if he didn’t qualify. Mayor, what is so wrong with the city that you lead that you’d prefer to spend this much time away from it? (Patch)

Despite the law signed by Governor Cuomo last week barring them from state waters, the company floating billboards around Manhattan and Brooklyn’s shoreline continues to do so after finding a loophole in the language used in the law. The state has not enforced the new law with any citations. (Gothamist)

The case against Jeffrey Epstein was officially closed by a Manhattan federal judge. (Patch)

One of the hidden gems of the garment district is Acuario Cafe. How can you find it? There no signs and you can only find by walking through a freight elevator of an office building on 37th St. (Viewing NYC)

Do you know about the IFC’s secret peephole? (Bedford + Bowery)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge bike lanes make riding across the bridge easy. Getting to the bridge on a bike? Much more difficult. (amNY)

Two former NYPD Detectives who were initially accused of raping an 18-year-old woman in their custody have pleaded guilty to receiving a bribe and “official misconduct” for having sex with a teenager inside a police van after a traffic stop in Coney Island, and will only serve five years of probation. (Gothamist)

16 fantastic Filipino restaurants. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 21, 2019 – The “Bragging About Being Better Than Queens” Edition

Two Proud Boys are convicted, Cuomo bans floating billboards, the city’s secret waterfalls, the Ritz-Carlton penthouse is for sale, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

What are your neighbors complaining about the most? (The Real Deal)

The latest exhibit at the Transit Museum focuses on the history of subway signs. (Untapped Cities)

Have you been indoctrinated into the cult of cauliflower gnocchi? (Grub Street)

Nothing is as Brooklyn as bragging about being better than Queens. (Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: The abandoned Miller Air Field in Staten Island. (Untapped Cities)

Manero’s Pizza has stepped into the city’s pizza battles with a hybrid New York/Neapolitan slice. (Grub Street)

It’s not a pre-snowstorm run on food, this disaster is the modern-day Dean & Deluca’s. (Eater)

A guide to $1 happy hour oysters, the holy grail, in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The safest neighborhoods in the city. (StreeyEasy)

Wayla vs Wayan vs Wayo. Getting the restaurant names straight in the city isn’t as always simple. (Eater)

Following the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, activists have named five additional officers who they say should be fired for their connection to the death of Eric Garner. (Politico)

New York joined the lawsuit against the federal government over the finalized changes to the “public charge” rule, which will deny citizenship, visas, and green cards to immigrants enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (amNY)

July was the tenth hottest month in NYC history. (Gothamist)

Where to find the city’s secret waterfalls. (6sqft)

Not on the list is the Marcy Houses, where tenants were battling a waterfall in their stairwell due to a burst pipe. (Patch)

The mayor has claimed victory in reforming the NYPD, but the reality isn’t as simple. (Gotham Gazette)

The AirTrain to JFK will be increasing in price from $5 to $7.75 starting November 1. (Second Ave Sagas)

The digital billboards that have been floating around Manhattan are illegal as of Monday, when Governor Cuomo signed a bill to law making them immediately illegal. The company behind the billboards has vowed to find a new loophole to continue their annoying goal of making sure New Yorkers are always looking at advertising somewhere. (NY Times)

Everyone is prone to make real estate mistakes, but not everyone writes an essay for Domino Magazine about it, but then again Lena Dunham isn’t everyone. (Domino)

Vendors could be banned from the Dyker Heights Christmas lights displays this year because of the volume of trash visitors left lying around in previous years. New Yorkers are renown for disposing of their garbage anywhere they’d like, and a neighborhood that’s residential through most of the year isn’t meant to hold the trash of 150,000 visitors. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed to address the homelessness crisis in his last mayoral campaign, but critics say his plans are falling short. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo signed the “Deed Theft Bill” into law, which provides greater protections for owners of homes that are in default or foreclosure. (Kings County Politics)

Does the opening of the Brooklyn Grange, the city’s largest rooftop farm, signal a real change for the city? (Brooklyn Based)

Maxwell Hare, 27, and John Kinsman, 39, guilty of attempted gang assault, attempted assault, and rioting as part of the Proud Boys fight on the Upper East Side in October of last year. They’ll be sentenced in October and face up to 15 years in prison. (Gothamist)

The best new restaurants on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The ultimate guide to renting in NYC. (Curbed)

If you’ve got $49 million and a burning desire to live in the Ritz-Carlton’s penthouse, I’ve got an apartment to sell you. (The Real Deal)

The PlayStation Theater in Times Square will be closing January 1. The last shows at the theater will be a four-night run by the Disco Biscuits. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Nike York City? The city agreed to license its logo and a few dozen other ephemera to Nike to print them on its merchandise. Does anyone want an NYPD Bomb Squad sneaker? (Patch)

Here are the companies in NYC with the fastest revenue growth. (Patch)

Whatever a “classic NYC experience” is, amNY has a list of restaurants where you can still experience it. (amNY)