The Briefly for February 16-18, 2021 – The “Because Whoopi Goldberg Told Me To” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: 22 hour subway service starts soon, drama in the bird community, the Soho Grifter is out, the oldest bars on the UWS, and more

Today – Low: 20˚ High: 44˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.

22-hour subway service will start on 2/22, shutting down daily from 2-4 am. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Nearly a quarter of New York City’s students with disabilities have not received all of the services they’re entitled to this school year, according to new figures that offer the most comprehensive picture yet of special education during the pandemic. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The MTA got 25 celebrities to record Covid-19 PSAs for the subways. Finally New Yorkers will follow mask and social distancing guidelines because Michael Rapaport and Whoopi Goldberg told them to. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

• The seawall to protect Staten Island from another Hurricane Sandy was scheduled to be finished this year, but construction isn’t expected to be finished for another five years or more. Radiation from a 1940s landfill in Great Kills Park halted progress on the East Shore Seawall as the city, state, and federal governments fight over who”s responsible for getting rid of the radiation. (Clifford Michel for The City)

The Bronx is #2 highest risk in the country from natural disasters only behind Los Angeles. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

• Green-Wood Cemetery wants your help to identify thousands of WWII soldiers buried at the cemetery. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

• Good question: What does the mayor of NYC actually do? (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

A look at how the roots of the NAACP run through Greenwich Village. (Joey Rodriguez for GVSHP)

• Video: Kissaki chef Mark Garcia makes 200-300 omakase to-go boxes every night. (Director Pelin Keskin for Eater)

• It’s not just your imagination, the city’s snowstorms have been getting worse. (Lydia McMullen-Laird for Gothamist)

• If you’re in the latest group of New Yorkers eligible for the vaccine, you’ve learned that the state’s vaccine website is utter garbage and can’t keep up with demand. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The alleged subway stabber, Rigoberto Lopez, was arrested. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

NYC’s bird watching community is feeling the pressure of popularity after getting a wider amount of interest form the general public in the last year. (Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

• Anna Sorokin aka Anna Delvey, the fake heiress grifter convicted of grand larceny, is out of prison and working on a memoir and a TV show. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Revel is expanding its service to electric bikes for a subscription cost of $90/month. you’ll get a pedal-assisted bike to use for as long as you’re a subscriber rather than their traditional model of looking for one on the street. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

9 indie Brooklyn bookstores to visit. (Emilie Murphy for Brooklyn Magazine)

• Governor Cuomo almost apologized, but still didn’t, for his administration’s actions that led to the Covid-19 nursing scandal. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

What it’s like to run a movie theater, the Cobble Hill Cinema, in a pandemic. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Thanks to reader Lolita for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for December 11, 2019 – The “See Something, Cease & Desist Something” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: SantaCon’s party yachts have been canceled, witchy holiday markets, ask a librarian, the Trash Train contest finds a winner, and more

Today – Low: 27˚ High: 39˚
Light snow in the morning.

Here’s what to expect with next month’s sweeping bail reforms. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Comparing someone to David Duke doesn’t speak highly of them. When it’s one of the NYPD’s top cops? That’s the comparison made to Deputy Inspector Constantin Tsachas for comments he made about NYPD officers targeting black and Latinx men on the subways. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

A new law will force some new constructions and renovations to use glass that is bird-friendly, to prevent birds from accidentially killing themselves by hitting the glass. The NYC Audobon Society estimates 90,000 – 230,000 birds die in the city due to window collisions. (Ryan F. Mendelbaum for Gizmodo)

Let’s check in on those adorable red-tailed hawks in Tompkins Square Park.. OHGOD IT IS EATING THAT PIGEON. (Laura Goggin Photography)

The MTA’s “See Something, Say Something” slogan is trademarked and they are happy to send cease and desist letters to other cities. Enjoy your C&D, Buffalo. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

SantaCon’s five free party yachts, sponsored by Fireball whiskey, were canceled thanks to concern from City Councilmember Keith Powers, State Senator Brad Hoylman, and Assembly Member Harvey Epstein. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Not all things have been discovered, until now. Congrats are in order to Joe Dator, who has discovered the two hot dog bun. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

The fleet of dollar vans have a new app and an aim to disrupt the city’s buses. (Kimko de Freitas-Tamura for NY Times)

Why is it necessary for the City Council to compel the NYPD to prioritize on towing illegally parked vehicles? Ah, here it is. It’s part of the attempt to crack down on parking placard abuse, a favorite pastime of the NYPD. (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

Andres “Andy” Fernandez was found guilty of second-degree murder of L&B Spumoni Gardens owner Louis Barbati. He faces 25 to life when sentenced next month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

11 witchy, queens, and unique holiday markets. (Cassidy Dawn Graves for Bedford + Bowery)

The founder of Barstool Sports David Portnoy, SantaCon if it were a person, is opening a pizzeria. He’s being investigated by the National Labor Relations Board for threats of firing employees who discussed unionization, he’s made a habit of threatening and harassing female reporters, and is all around disease. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

New York state lost a lawsuit against Exxon-Mobile that claimed the company engaged in fraud through its statements about how it accounted for the costs of climate change regulation. (John Schwartz for NY Times)

Got a question and don’t feel like Googling? Call an NYPL librarian. (Great Big Story)

Tin Pan Alley, a part of 28th between Broadway and Sixth, is now recognized as a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Tin Pan Alley is the birthplace of American popular music. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The laminated pollo bar, the limoncello pistachio bar, and the rest of the the five must-eat items from Brooklyn’s all-day cafe explosion. (Nikitia Richardson for Grub Street)

Got a better name for Bridge & Tunnel Park in Long Island City? The Parks Department is looking for ideas. (Kristen Torres for LIC Post)

Rudy Giuliani, the mayor-turned-goblin, and estranged wife Judith have come to a settlement to avoid a divorce trial. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Staten Island’s Republican City Council Members Joe Borelli and Steven Matteo are introducing legislation to create a task for to explore a Staten Island secession. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Essex Crossing is hiding a nasty secret: A Vision Zero nightmare on the East side of the development. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A look at the appalling conditions of the apartments that the homeless of New York City have been assigned in Newark. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure has never been more true than the trash treasures found at the bottom of the Gowanus Canal that will eventually find a home in a museum. (Gowanus Lounge)

Here’s the winner of the “Trash Train” photo contest held by the Transport Workers Union Local 100. The photo is of the aftermath of someone dropping a deuce between subway cars. The contest was held to highlight the need to add back cleaning jobs that cut back the times trains are cleaned by 50%. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Interested in the rest of the Trash Train entries? With photo titles like “Fluids?,” “Two Puddles of Vomit,” and “Number 2 done expressly on the #2 Express,” click the link at your own risk. (Train Train)

Pete Wells’s top 10 new restaurants in the city. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Congrats to the winners of this year’s Eater Awards for restaurant of the year, design of the year, and bakery of the year. (Eater)

Thanks to Mary von Aue for today’s featured image

The Briefly for May 13, 2019 – The “The Thing Is, I’m Not Sorry” Edition

The mayor announces the city will work more closely with ICE, CitiBike’s electric bikes aren’t coming back until the fall, these kittens need adopting, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes hit the 4, 6, 7, A, E, N, and Q trains. (Subway Changes)

It’s been seven years since Hurricane Sandy and the city has only spent 54% of the $14.7 billion in the federal aid set aside for recovery. City Comptroller Scott Stringer blames federal bureaucracy but also puts blame on City Hall’s lack of urgency to protect itself against the next storm. (Curbed)

The Times is getting in on the de Blasio anti-endorsement train. (NY Times)

10 quiet places to escape the city’s noises. (Untapped Cities)

A look back to Bertha Heyman, a swindler of men in New York from the 1880s. Even from prison, she swindled a man out of his life’s savings. (Atlas Obscura)

Anna Sorokin, from prison, said she’d be “lying to you and to everyone else and to myself if I said I was sorry for anything.” Maybe the next step is conning someone out of their life’s savings. (NY Times)

A walk through Brooklyn’s Dekalb Market is an exercise in bathing yourself in the chaotic glow of multiple colors and shapes of neon lights which has a distinct “city” feel. The Times looks back with photos at when neon lights shone with hope and glamour and gave New York and Times Square a visual identity. (NY Times)

Are you ready for a summer of floating LED billboards at city beaches? (Gothamist)

Some of us love birds but don’t have the patience for bird watching. Maybe that’s part of the Central Park Mandarin Duck’s appeal. If you can’t be bothered with finding the hot duck, there’s Nicolas Holiber’s Birds on Broadway, the Audubon Sculpture Project, which is bringing ten sculptures of native NY birds in danger of going extinct to the medians of Broadway. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA’s 7 Train work is completed, with the trains programmed for optimal cruising speed and increases the number of trains per hour during peak service from 25-27 to 29. (Sunnyside Post)

The first electric unicycle explosion happened near Union Square, which started a two-alarm fire. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including a triple-digit violation, which really takes effort. (Patch)

22 bars where you can actually find a seat. (The Infatuation)

This year’s NYC Century Bike Tour will be the last. Transportation Alternatives’ strategy has changed over the last 30 years and so has riding a bicycle in the city. With about 10% of all New Yorkers riding a bike several times a month, biking no longer needs to be established as a legitimate form of transportation. (Streetsblog)

“The vast, vast majority of undocumented people in this city know their city government is protecting them, respecting them, supporting them.” Mayor de Blasio announced the city will be working even more closely cooperate with ICE. (Patch)

A guide to all of the reasons that the mayor is running for president, like being habitually late, he gets driven to the gym on a daily basis to avoid taking the train, and… no one can make this guy look like a viable candidate. (Gothamist)

16 of the coolest hotel pools in the city, including some open to the public. (Curbed)

Imagine the terror of one million New Yorkers moving on the same day. That day used to be May 1 when almost all of the city’s leases were up. Imagine the equivalent of a million New Yorkers all moving on the same day. (CityMetric)

Where to go drinking with your dog on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

One of the most prolific members of the online white supremacist community was ID’d as 30-year-old Flushing resident Joseph Jordan, according to an investigation from the watchdog group Southern Poverty Law Center. (Gothamist)

The governor is calling for investigations into possible widespread fraud at the MTA over the misreporting of overtime. If you’re looking for a blow-by-blow of politicians, transit officials, and labor representatives pointing fingers and shift blame, there was an “emergency” MTA board meeting where labor representatives and Governor Cuomo’s MTA appointees pointed fingers, shifted blame, and of course, got nothing accomplished. (amNY & Second Ave Sagas)

It’s the start of kitten season in the city, which means the ASPCA is expecting 1,500 kittens from May to October. They are looking for people willing to foster kittens and offers training, food, supplies, and support. Plus “I’m fostering kittens right now” will look very good on your Tinder profile. (Gothamist)

Video: Peter Wallker dissects preconceived notions about the dangers of “cyclists.” (The Guardian)

Something must be seriously screwed up with CitiBike’s pedal-assisted bikes. They were pulled from the streets in April for a problem with the brakes and they won’t be seen again until the fall. (Streetsblog)

Meet the NYCHA plumber that earned over $200,000 in overtime last year. (The City)

The city’s top 14 burgers, from The Daily Meal’s list of the best 101 in the nation. (Patch)

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