The Briefly for September 4 – 5, 2020 – The “A Real Turd of an Idea From Cuomo” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest on indoor dining, mall and gym reopenings, indoor and outdoor schooling, the rolled-up cheese sandwich, 13 to-go negronis, and more

Today – Low: 67˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 66˚ High: 81˚

What’s open and closed on Labor Day. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

62% of New Yorkers believe the worst is yet to come when it comes to Covid-19, according to a Siena College Research Institute poll. 82% believe the state will face another large outbreak in the fall. Who says New Yorkers aren’t optimistic? Apparently New Yorkers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The bonkers story of Gennaro Brooks-Church and Loretta Gendville, the eco-yogi slumlords of Brooklyn. (Bridget Read for The Cut)

A rolled-up cheese sandwich, a cup o noodles, Pop-Tarts, and the other Bushwick-esque foods being offered by bars in, yes, Bushwick. (Jackson Schroeder for Bushwick Daily)

A year ago, the city’s jobless rate was at 4.3%. This year unemployment is sitting at 20%. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The first statue of historical women in Central Park was unveiled, Women’s Rights Pioneers Monument, featuring Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A Ford Taurus drove into a group of protesters on Thursday night in Times Square, injuring multiple people protesting the killing of Daniel Prude. The NYPD declined to say if the driver had been arrested. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The New York City public school system’s reopening will be delayed, with “instructional transition and orientation” starting remotely on September 16th and in-person learning pushed back to September 21st. (Sophia Chang, Jen Chung, and Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

“We’re trying to move heaven and earth to try to get buses in place by the first day of school.” How is it possible that the city has had the entire summer to get ready for schools to open and it’s not a given that the city’s children will have buses to bring them to school. According to the executive director of pupil transportation, “it’s really a day-to-day scenario.” (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The City Council met to hear concerns about Mayor de Blasio’s school opening plans. 140 people spoke, not one of them was a Department of Education official. According to one of de Blasio’s advisors, we’ll see”a resurgence.” Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer said she allocated $12 million for ventilation system upgrades in schools and the money hasn’t been spent, despite the city claiming poverty. School starts on September 21 and in-person classes start one week later. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Success Academy, the city’s largest charter school system, is going completely remote for the remainder of 2020a first look at what Covid-19 outdoor classes will look like. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Several city school teachers are filing for injunctive relief against the city and Chancellor Richard Carranza, asking a judge to block in-person learning at the city’s public schools. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

“Since coronavirus is less likely to spread outdoors, letting all New York City schools hold class in public parks and on cordoned-off city streets, on its face, seems like a positive development. But I didn’t need to read the fine print to know that our immigrant, Black, and brown communities — the ones that have been hit hardest by the COVID-19 crisis — would get the short end of the stick. I didn’t need to know who organized and petitioned for outdoor learning to know that the “nice white parents,” a perennial force for maintaining inequities in one of the nation’s most segregated school systems, would get their way. Again.”
-Lynn Shoh, a public school teacher, I advocate for outdoor learning. But NYC’s plan for it will further privilege ‘nice white parents’ for Chalkbeat

Diddy and educational speaker Dr. Steve Perry announced on Thursday that they are opening their latest charter school, Capital Prep Bronx, which aims to provide “historically disadvantaged” students with a standout curriculum, in order to prepare them with “college and career readiness skills.” (J’na Jefferson for The Root)

J’Ouvert festivities are canceled, but that isn’t stopping the NYPD from stepping up their presence this weekend in Brooklyn. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

A look at the history of the NYPD’s computerized system CompStat and why NYPD captains want to stop its usage. (Alexander Jusdanis for Bedford + Bowery)

The NYPD’s Police Benevolent Association endorsed Donald Trump president, which was a surprise to the Guardians Association, a fraternal order of Black police officers, who called the endorsement a “lack of respect” and takes police to “a dark place.” Let’s be honest here, the NYPD endorsing Trump is as surprising as your very obviously racist uncle from Alabama telling you about his collection of knives from WWII that just so happen to be from Germany. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Bronx Country District Attorney Darcel Clark announced that she would move to dismiss more than 300 of the curfew summonses issued during protests in Mott Haven on June 4. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

In the wake of the death of Layleen Polanco, the mayor said the NYPD should not be arresting people for sex work. The mayor has no authority over what the NYPD does and does not do and it’s up to district attorneys to decide to press charges against people who have been arrested. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

There are 200 people in city jails due to technical parole violations, lower than last year’s 726, but mostly due to Governor Cuomo’s push to reduce jail populations du to Covid-19 fears. Criminal justice advocates are pushing for the number to be zero. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Does the mayor have any authority in this city? Mayor de Blasio asked community boards to voluntarily lay off some of their pad staff to help contribute to the city’s $9 billion budget shortfall. The answer from some boards was “no.” (Kevin Duggan for Brownstoner)

Add the Barclays Center to MSG as a polling site this November, making both the largest polling site in their respective boroughs. (David Gannon for 6sqft)

Noticing a whole lot more “no-fee” apartments throughout the city? Pandemic, pandemic, pandemic. Normally in August, there might be 50% of all apartments in Brooklyn and Manhattan. This year the number is closer to 75 or 85%. (Michael Kolomatsky for NY Times)

RIP Tom Seaver, the Mets’ greatest player. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

Have you received a random copy of The Epoch Times, which is also known as “garbage?” You’re not alone. The pro-Trump newspaper was suddenly delivered to people in multiple Brooklyn neighborhoods surrounding Bed Stuy. (Jessy Edwards for The Brooklyn Reader)

A look at U Thant Island, Manhattan’s smallest island that’s also off-limits to the public. Wanna go visit? U Thant! I’ll be here all weekend. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

I’ll admit this has been a lot of bad news, but here’s a palate cleanser for you. 25 quotes about New York that fill us with immeasurable pride. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Photos: Rockefeller Center’s new major sculpture installation. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Governor is allowing malls will be reopening in the city on September 9. Food courts and other eateries will remain closed and no mallrats. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Myths and secrets of the Grand Central Clock. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The city is lowering the speed limit on nine roads to 25 miles an hour, the standard speed limit on city roads. This includes parts of Riverside Drive, Flatbush Ave, Northern Blvd, Bruckner Blvd, Short Parkway Service Rd, Dahlgren Pl, Webster Ave, and Targee St. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Apartment Porn: Four outdoor spaces, a wine cellar, and a ludicrously large shower can be found in shis $6 million Park Slope brownstone.

Another portion of the Highline, The Spur, is reopening to the public this weekend (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats to Alaska and Montana for making the NY Covid-19 quarantine list. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A makeshift Breonna Taylor memorial has popped up outside St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery. (EV Grieve)

Here’s what to expect inside the city’s newly reopened gyms. (Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

Over 60% of restaurants and bars in the state are “likely” or “somewhat likely” to permanently close by next year, according to a New York State Restaurant Association survey of 1,042 responses. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Over 300 restaurants are suing the city for $2 billion for the city’s ongoing indoor dining plan. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

What’s the latest on indoor dining from the mayor? In his ever-changing public comments about it, he’s now pivoted to saying that there will be an answer by the end fo the month. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Governor Cuomo has a real turd of an idea. According to the governor, indoor dining could resume in NYC if the NYPD enforces compliance of regulations. Maybe he doesn’t remember why the NYPD was pulled from enforcing social distancing in the first place? It looks like an NYPD officer not wearing a mask properly with his knee on the neck of a person of color on the sidewalk. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Eater is keeping a running list of restaurants that have permanently closed. (Eater)

Opposite of that list, here’s a list of new restaurants that opened in NYC. (Eater)

The 21 most in-demand NYC outdoor dining reservations. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

13 to-go Negronis you can grab today. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 4, 2020 – The “Batten Down the Hatches!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The reason for the spike in shootings, Open Restaurants will continue next year, how to stay safe on mass transit, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 81˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.

President Trump and his company are being investigated for possible bank and insurance fraud by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance. (William K. Rashbaum and Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is once again open to visitors. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

The city is getting ready for a storm surge of 1-2 feet during Tuesday’s expected downpour from Tropical Storm Isaias. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Eataly’s new summer rooftop restaurant, opening on August 7. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

According to an NYC Hospitality Alliance survey, only 17.2% of restaurants and bars say they’re able to pay 50% or more of their rent. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

One-third of the city’s small businesses may close forever, according to a report from the Partnership for New York City with job losses already at 520,000. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

New York state is extending its unemployment insurance past the 26-week limit through the end of the year. (East New York News)

All about rent increases. When can it happen, how much can it be, and how to check if your apartment is stabilized. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

The NYPD’s 26th Precinct has a Twitter problem. The precinct is in the heart of Harlem and their Twitter account has a history of hitting the like button on tweets about conspiracy theories, QAnon, and Trump. After being caught, the account removed the likes. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Evergreen headline for the moment: “The NYPD is investigating shootings.” (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

The mayor has his own ideas, as does Commissioner Shea, but the data shows the reason for the city’s spike in shootings is a plummeting number of gun crime arrests. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

NYPD officer Richard Catapano was found dead in his Astoria apartment from an apparent suicide. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Enjoying Open Restaurants? They’ll be back next year, starting on June 1. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In addition to Open Restaurants returning next year, the city is making curbside dining permanent from June 1 to October 31. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Photos: See the 193 new Rockefeller Center flags designed by the public. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Photos: 22 new libraries opened this week to offer grab-and-go service. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Maintenance workers and security guards at Columbia University will not be going on strike after TWO Local 241 reached an agreement with the university. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

The most expensive area to live in the city during the first half of the year was the 10014 zip code, covering the West Village and Greenwich Village will set you back a median price of $4.2 million. Tribeca’s 10013 was in second place at $3.1 million. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk through Prospect Park from dog beach to Parkside Avenue. (ActionKid)

A Walgreen grows in Brooklyn. (Greenpointers)

A basket intended to prevent debris from falling off of elevated subway tracks onto pedestrians… fell onto a pedestrian on Sunday. An NYC Transit Interim SVP calling it “a very unfortunate incident.” The person hit was taken to the hospital and was reported to be in stable condition. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

If the city’s schools open, what is the city’s plan to get all 150,000 students who rely on buses to school? “The DOE is recommending that families, wherever possible, help reduce the number of students in need of busing by either transporting their children to school on their own, walking, or biking,” aka “you’re on your own.” Got it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Video: Drone footage of all eight Black Lives Matter murals in NYC. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist, video from @mingomatic)

Despite the city’s plans to reopen the schools for the fall, Governor Cuomo has yet to make a decision to allow any school in the state to reopen. He’s expected to announce a decision this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Shootings jumped 177% in July compared to last year, according to the NYPD. Assaults and reported rapes declined year-over-year. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Black Lives Matter mural walls in Gowanus were defaced with the tired response of “All Lives Matter.” This is the wall that was accidentally painted over once, so I have confidence that this will be fixed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Photos and Video: The red-tailed hawks of Governors Island. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Tips on how to stay safer on mass transit. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

Photos: What the hell is going on with the splashes of blood outside this meat market in Astoria? (Give Me Astoria)

Can you think of a good reason that Williamsburg has more trash cans than Bed Stuy? No, seriously, it’s not a setup to a joke. “Bed Stuy Strong, Safe and Sanitary” wants your input. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Meet Diana Florence, a candidate for Manhattan District Attorney and a former leader of the Construction Fraud Task Force within the DA’s office. She stepped down in January amid allegations that she withheld evidence. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

Facebook signed its 730,000 square foot lease in the Farley Post Office building. When will it move in? That’s a whole other story. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

A judge weighed in on some disputed ballots in NY-12’s Democratic congressional primary allowing some invalidated votes to be counted, but not enough to sway the primary away from incumbent Carolyn Maloney towards challenger Suraj Patel. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

15 summery brunch options for takeout and delivery. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 22, 2020 – The “$400 Million Extra in Overtime” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A guide to Governors Island, the state’s legislature sets an agenda for its summer session, where to heat outside in the East Village, and more

Today – Low: 78˚ High: 88˚
Possible rain in the evening.

What to expect when you’re expecting the state legislature’s summer session to start soon. In focus will be nursing homes, automatic voter registration, redistricting, contract tracing privacy, and more. (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

Following the June 23 primary and election, State Assemblymember Jeffrey Dinowitz is pushing legislation that would extend the state’s relaxed absentee voting rules until January 2022, which is the earliest the state’s constitution could be amended. (Norwood News)

What’s open, what’s closed, what to eat, and what to wear (a mask). A guide to Government Island. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A Queens man claimed NYPD officers beat him, twice Tased him, and yanked out one of his dreadlocks, according to a federal police brutality lawsuit. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD pledged to cut overtime by $335 million in an attempt to cut its budget by $1 billion. Instead, they are predicted to overspend on overtime by $400 million by the Independent Budget Office. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Our absentee voting mess is giving the White House ammo against main-in voting. Great. (Daniel Marans for HuffPost)

12 ways to picnic in Tompkins Square Park. (Rob Patronite for Grub Street)

New York Attorney General Letitia James along with 23 other Democratic attorney generals are suing the Trump administration to stop a new rule that removes non-discrimination protections against LGBTQ people when it comes to health care and health insurance, which is set to take effect in mid-August. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for QNS)

The latest Black Lives Matter / Blue Lives Matter protest clash happened in Marine Park in Brooklyn, but this time there were words exchanged without violence. (amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The new take-out only Smorgasburg. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A woman was found floating in the East River on Monday night with no signs of trauma on her body. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Jonathan Rodriguez was the second person arrested in connection with the death of Richard Hamlet, whose body was discovered wrapped in plastic atop a Bronx McDonald’s last week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If it didn’t fully set in the other day, the F train will be shutting down on nights and weekends for eight months starting in August. Ruining subway reliability? Now THAT is how we start feeling normal again. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Is it possible that the Mets’ deal with Jed Lowrie is the worst in the franchise’s history? The Mets started paying him $20 million a year last year, he’s made eight plate appearances, was injured for the rest of the season and is already on the injured list. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

In an attempt to “resolve problems outside the court system,” Mayor de Blasio announced a mediation project for the city to work with landlords and tenants. Renters will receive legal assistance and advice to negotiate with landlords. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

After 21 years, radical bookstore, cafe, and activist center Bluestockings is looking for a new home. The bookstore is being pushed from the location by their landlord’s demands for higher rent. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Interview: Storm King Art Center’s Director of Facilities Mike Seaman on what it takes to maintain Storm King year round, keeping it a beautiful place that everyone is already tired of seeing your photos of on Instagram. (Luna Shyr for Atlas Obscura)

The closing Fairway grocery stores in Red Hook and Douglaston, Queens will become Food Bazaar stores. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Rooftop Films is back to create a summer movie drive-in theater in Flushing Meadows Park. It started on Friday night with John Lewis: Good Trouble, which was a few hours before the news of Lewis’s beath became public. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

Interview: Melba’s restaurant’s Melba Wilson on the future of NYC restaurants. (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

M.I.A. and Brik Bar in Astoria and Maspeth Pizza House in Maspeth have all had their liquor licenses revoked. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden will reopen on August 7. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Meet Street Riders NYC, the mobile protest movement with over 60,000 among its ranks. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Wear your damn mask on the subway. That’s the message of the MTA’s Mask Force, an arm of “Operation Respect.” (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Upper East Side for Black Lives Matter has held 50 consecutive nights of vigils in Charles Schurz Park. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Black Tap is selling its Instagram-ready milkshakes to-go for the first time. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

I don’t know a single person who would say that the COVID-19 pandemic has been easy to get through, but as a disabled New Yorker, it came with extra challenges and stressors. Politicians talked about the importance of protecting the elderly but failed to mention disabled people as if we didn’t exist. Do you know what it’s like to be erased during a pandemic?
-Michele Kaplan, disability rights advocate, Disability and dignity in the age of COVID-19 for amNewyork Metro

From Tuesday to Saturday from 12-4 pm and 5-9 pm at Lincoln Center until August 1, Lincoln Center will be playing music in the Josie Robertson Plaza, the initiative is being called Sounds of Lincoln Center. (Mike Mishkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

Riders are up on the city’s buses, but speeds are down. New York City is healing herself. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Someone is using Republican Assemblymember and congressional candidate Nicole Malliotakis’s name to talk shit about the mayor and governor on flyers in Bay Ridge. Malliotakis says someone is trying to defame her by putting up the flyers. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Councilmember Donovan Richards won the Queens borough president primary and will go on to the general election in November to likely become the first Black man elected to the office. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

Interview: Joycelyn Taylor, candidate for NYC mayor is 2021.(Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Photos: As the summer heat cooks the city, the city is no longer just living through the pandemic, we’re living with it. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Where to eat outside in the East Village. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo from a recent Bowery walk!