The Briefly for July 9, 2019 – The “Attack Rats Leaping From Trash Piles” Edition

Vision Zero is “working” with three deaths in two days, the Jeffrey Epstein case, visualizing your awful subway commute, ice cream in Bushwick, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

What do the city’s weed dealers think about Albany’s failure to legalize marijuana? Most of the ones Gothamist spoke to seemed to be behind the idea of legalization, even if it means changing their business. (Gothamist)

Get “disinfected” at The Museum of Booze. (Atlas Obscura)

We’ve got enough problems before we have to start dealing with rats leaping from the trash. (Patch)

Bastille Day is nearing, do you know how to celebrate? (Grub Street)

The Governor signed a bill into law that will allow the release of President Trump’s state tax returns. (NY Times)

A good way to get shot by an NYPD officer is yelling “Die!” while also yelling that you have a gun. (Patch)

A new tool from The New York Times will visualize how unpredictable your subway commute is so you can quantify your misery. (NY Times)

The Guggenheim Museum on the Upper East Side was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of eight Frank Lloyd Wright buildings that received the honor. (Curbed)

8 Frank Lloyd Wright houses in the city, mapped. (Curbed)

What you need to know about Wednesday’s ticker-tape parade for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team. (6sqft)

In a move that is both horrifying and also not surprising, the Department of Health let the Housing Authority appeal inspectors’ discovery of lead in apartments, leaving children exposed to lead in some cases for years. (Curbed)

For the second time in a month, someone set fire to one of the rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard in the Bronx. The state’s hate crimes task force is investigating. (amNY)

What would the city look like if sea levels rose 100 feet? Mostly underwater according to this map. (Viewing NYC)

A day in the life of Váyalo Cocina’s Ana Fernandez, who came to the United States from Venezuela on vacation and stayed seeking asylum with her wife and sister. You can find Váyalo Cocina at Smorgasburg in Williamsburg on Saturdays (NY Times)

One week into Mayor de Blasio’s major enforcement action against vehicles blocking and parking in bike lanes. Let’s check in to see how it’s going on Second Ave. (Streetsblog)

In what seems like a test to everyone along the L line, the MTA announced that for 9 weeks of nights and weekends there will be no L train service between Lorimer St and Broadway Junction starting July 16 and ending October 4. (Greenpointers)

There’s a whole neighborhood between DUMBO and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. 10 things to know about Vinegar Hill. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Inside the drama, comedy, and tragedy of producing theater outdoors across the city. (amNY)

The federal case against Jeffrey Epstein is centered on his Upper East Side Mansion, where prosecutors say he sexually abused dozens of underage girls in a yearslong sex-trafficking conspiracy. (Patch)

Epstein has pleaded not guilty. (Gothamist)

Inside Epstein’s Upper East Side Mansion, which is one of the largest private homes in Manhattan. (NY Times)

The NYPD plans to launch a peer counseling program later this year in an effort to improve cops’ access to mental-health resources after a string of four suicides in June. (Patch)

Take a video tour of MAD Magazine’s offices as the publication will cease printing new material this summer. (Gothamist)

A look inside the lawsuit the Cabán campaign filed, which highlights a lack of trust in the Board of Elections. (QNS)

The mayor still believes that Vision Zero is “working,” despite three people being killed by drivers in the last two days. (Gothamist)

The city is expanding its initiatives designed to encourage green rooftops after no landlord received a tax credit for it in 2018. (amNY)

8 ice cream spots in and around Bushwick. There are that many ice cream spots in and around Bushwick? Bushwick is whatever you want it to be. Maybe there are a million places to get ice cream in Bushwick and you’ve just never seen them all. (Bushwick)

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The Briefly for June 3, 2019 – The “Albany May Fail to Pass Gay and Trans Panic Ban for Pride” Edition

Moishe’s gets a new life, pre-K workers get a new deal, 57 early voting sites selected, the 25 most expensive homes for sale in the city, Anthony Bourdain day will be June 25, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Wu-Tang Ain’t Nothing To Fur With. (Patch)

Two bills that would ban the gay and trans panic defense (where a legal defense claiming someone else being LGBTQ caused them “extreme emotional disturbance”) are in danger of not passing in the legislature. It’s astounding that anything gets done in Albany. (Gothamist)

The city’s public defenders are demanding a raise, noting that the low pay from their job often forces them to get a second job to make ends meet. They are asking for $50 million to at least be on par with attorneys in the city’s Office of Corporate Counsel. The responsibility to allocate the funds belongs to our mayor, who would rather traipse around the country, pretending to be a presidential candidate. (Patch)

They start at $48 million. The 25 most expensive apartments in NYC. (Curbed)

What do you get with an $85 million home? For starters, two tickets to space. (Gothamist)

What to do and where to eat in Morris Park, east of the Bronx Zoo. (amNY)

Moishe’s Bake Shop, which has had more lives than a feral cat, will reopen after renovations are complete under new management and may potentially change the name to ‘Formerly Moishe’s’. (EV Grieve)

With Amazon searching for office space in Manhattan, it certainly seems that they didn’t need billions of dollars in tax incentives. There should be a lesson in there, but let’s not get our hopes up. (Slate)

George Catalano, the man caught on video attacking a Lyft driver, surrendered himself to the NYPD for reckless endangerment and assault. (Gothamist)

Chefs Eric Ripert and José Andrés announced a day of remembrance on June 25 to celebrate the life of the late, great Anthony Bourdain. (Grub Street)

Fordham University’s Rose Hill campus is home to the oldest seismic station in the United States. (Atlas Obscura)

Robin Russell-French has a bunch of walls and a desire to create the city’s next 5 Pointz. Will it be enough to lure artists to Sheepshead Bay? (Viewing NYC)

39 places for an outside date night. (The Infatuation)

What says “city park” quite like “mass gravesite with a million corpses buried by prisoners“? (6sqft)

Isaiah Thompson, the subway brake bandit, was charged with reckless endangerment and criminal trespass for creating 747 subway delay between March and May, add public lewdness charges to the pile for exposing himself to a platform of people in mid-May. (Gothamist)

The city is making changes to how pre-k teachers and childcare providers as paid, avoiding a strike. Pre-K for all is one of the mayor’s pet projects. (Chalkbeat)

The pros and cons of living in a doorman building. (StreetEasy)

The DailyMeal’s 75 best hole-in-the-wall restaurants include 21 from NYC. Highlights range from some unconventional picks to pizza staples to NYC standards. (Patch)

The West Village’s Barbuto is closed after fifteen years. This time rent is not to blame, it’s the new owner of the building who does not want a restaurant in that space. (Eater)

A veteran NYPD officer pleaded not guilty to charges that she schemed to murder her estranged husband and the young daughter of her boyfriend. (amNY)

The city’s Board of Elections added 57 early voting sites across the city, which still falls short of the 100 sites proposed by the mayor. Early voting for this fall’s election starts October 26. (Patch)

A look at the proposed BQX streetcar in its current proposed form. (amNY)

Can Sunset Park hold on to its manufacturing roots as the neighborhood is gentrifying? (Gothamist)

Mya Vizcarrondo-Rios jumped to her death from the roof of her Bronx apartment building in February after being bullied and sexually harassed by other students. A lawsuit from her parents claims the school regularly ignored her complaints. Members of the City Council are calling for a probe into what went wrong. (Patch)

The Brooklyn Jewish Children’s Museum has an interactive display wall outside the museum in Crown Heights and the NYPD’s Hate Crime Unit is investigating a message left on the wall stating “Hitler is coming.” (Gothamist)

Times Square is getting an pop-up Museum of Broadway in 2020. (amNY)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez worked as a waitress and bartender in a staged event at the Queensboro in Jackson Heights in support of a fair wage for tipped workers. (NY Times)

The case that Brad Lander, who represents Gowanus on the City Council, is making a bad faith promise with the rezoning around the Gowanus Canal. (Pardon Me For Asking)

13 new outdoor art installations not to miss in June. (Untapped Cities)

New Yorkers have never been shy about cursing in public. (Viewing NYC)

17 tropical restaurants and bars that feel like a vacation. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 1, 2019 – The “Wouldn’t We All Love to Ban Tour Guides With Groups” Edition

ApplePay comes to the MTA this summer, Tony Award nominations are in, the Dept of Education is accused of failing to protect students from sexual assault, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The mayor’s “Turning the Tide on the Homeless” program is facing criticism in a new report from the Coalition for the Homeless. The city’s homeless population has grown by 10% for each year Mayor de Blasio has been in office. January was a record-breaking year for the number of men, women, and children spending each night in a shelter at 64,000. (Gothamist)

The list of Tony nominations are in. This year’s big winner is “Hadestown” with 14 nominations. (NY Times)

A new lawsuit filed this week accuses the NYC Department of Education of failing to protect students against sexual assaults, file official complaints, conduct proper investigations, and support survivors dealing with trauma. Legal Services NYC filed the lawsuit on behalf of four girls aged 12 to 18. (Gothamist)

The National Park Service took an action on Liberty Island that most of us wish we could take anywhere we need to go: banned tour guides. (NY Times)

The Essex Market opened in 1940 at the behest of Mayor Fiorello Laguardia. This May the market’s original location closes to move across the street. (Untapped Cities)

“The one that I almost leapt over the counter to get was a quesadilla panino.” Eater’s weekly sandwich column from Robert Sietsema got a bit intense. (Eater)

Coney Island is getting another music venue, located in the center of the Coney Island Art Walls. “Amuse” will have a capacity of 4,000 and have programming between Memorial and Labor Day. (Gothamist)

If you’re looking to make an appreciable change in the city, the charter review process is your opportunity. (Curbed)

Was the body found under the Verrazzano Bridge an NYC Marathon runner? The body under the Verrazzano was one of two bodies found in the city’s waters last weekend. (Gothamist)

An Absolut Ban. An executive order from the mayor put the kibosh on newsstands, bus shelters, and LinkNYC alcohol ads, sponsorship or branding. The city doesn’t expect to lose any revenue as a result of the ban. (Patch)

What’s going on with the hundreds of “unfounded” rape cases in Queens? The 14.2% of reported rapes in Queens being unfounded is significantly higher than the city’s other boroughs. (QNS)

The problem with the city’s plan to divert L train riders to the J and M trains is that the J and M trains are just as reliable as they’ve ever been. Overnight Monday a switch problem brought both train lines to a halt, effectively turning the L train slowdown into a full-on East River shutdown. (Gothamist)

Today is the anniversary of the Empire State Building’s opening in 1931. A piece of trivia to unlease on unsuspecting people in your life. (GVSHP)

Speaking of trivia… tonight’s the night for JOHN TRVIALTA at Parklife:

Amazon is still coming to Queens but in the form of a new distribution center in Woodside. (The City)

Bronx Councilmember Andy King was accused of sexual harassment for the second time in two years. King is refusing to cooperate with the City Council. (Patch)

Billionaires’ Row is missing something significant. Billionaires. Nearly half of the apartments are unsold, including some buildings seven years old that remain half empty. (Curbed)

Take a look, because there are new renderings of Brooklyn’s Wegmans. (6sqft)

The Queens Library got a six-month extension on their Court Square lease to remain in the building through March 31, 2020. (LIC Post)

The NYPD found a new way to make biking or walking over the Brooklyn Bridge a nightmare. (Streetsblog)

What’s that tree outside your building? There’s a map for that. The New York City Street Tree Map is the world’s most accurate and detailed map of a city’s street trees. (Viewing NYC)

The art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

Nomiki Konst is under fire for questionable practices and payments during her Public Advocate campaign and is accused of being a “plan from the right.” You’d be forgiven if you couldn’t remember her or her campaign, she only garnered 2% of the vote. Konst’s campaign manager came forward about questionable donations, which were publicly matched, and even more questionable invoices. Konst has attempted to distance herself from the potential scandal, but she served as her own treasurer, which makes her legally responsible for her campaign’s financial system. (Politico)

Soon your apartment may be powered by poop! No, we’re not talking about your roommate. (Gothamist)

An appellate court upheld the city’s measles vaccination mandate on Monday, denying a request for a temporary restraining order by a group of anti-vaxxer parents as the number of confirmed cases in New York City rose to 423. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With all the measles talk going around, you’re not alone if you’re wondering if you should get yourself a booster shot as an adult. (NY Times)

Story update. Remember how the Board of Elections put all the city’s voter rolls online for anyone to look at? Well, that’s over. The BOE realized that maybe posting all of our names, addresses and party affiliations online wasn’t the best idea. (NY Times)

The MTA will begin support for ApplePay in the “early summer,” as the OMNY system is scheduled to go live on some 4, 5, and 6 train stops on May 31. (Engadget)

The latest city landmark debate is over Tin Pan Alley, the birthplace of popular music. The conversation made a surprising turn towards some of the racism expressed in songs created there. (Curbed)

The “NOT GONNA SUCK YOUR DICK” graffiti tag is getting attention. (Bowery Boogie)

Featured walk: The essential Upper West Side. (GoRoam)

Where to go if you want to eat a burger at the bar by yourself. (The Infatuation)

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