The Briefly for May 1, 2019 – The “Wouldn’t We All Love to Ban Tour Guides With Groups” Edition

ApplePay comes to the MTA this summer, Tony Award nominations are in, the Dept of Education is accused of failing to protect students from sexual assault, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The mayor’s “Turning the Tide on the Homeless” program is facing criticism in a new report from the Coalition for the Homeless. The city’s homeless population has grown by 10% for each year Mayor de Blasio has been in office. January was a record-breaking year for the number of men, women, and children spending each night in a shelter at 64,000. (Gothamist)

The list of Tony nominations are in. This year’s big winner is “Hadestown” with 14 nominations. (NY Times)

A new lawsuit filed this week accuses the NYC Department of Education of failing to protect students against sexual assaults, file official complaints, conduct proper investigations, and support survivors dealing with trauma. Legal Services NYC filed the lawsuit on behalf of four girls aged 12 to 18. (Gothamist)

The National Park Service took an action on Liberty Island that most of us wish we could take anywhere we need to go: banned tour guides. (NY Times)

The Essex Market opened in 1940 at the behest of Mayor Fiorello Laguardia. This May the market’s original location closes to move across the street. (Untapped Cities)

“The one that I almost leapt over the counter to get was a quesadilla panino.” Eater’s weekly sandwich column from Robert Sietsema got a bit intense. (Eater)

Coney Island is getting another music venue, located in the center of the Coney Island Art Walls. “Amuse” will have a capacity of 4,000 and have programming between Memorial and Labor Day. (Gothamist)

If you’re looking to make an appreciable change in the city, the charter review process is your opportunity. (Curbed)

Was the body found under the Verrazzano Bridge an NYC Marathon runner? The body under the Verrazzano was one of two bodies found in the city’s waters last weekend. (Gothamist)

An Absolut Ban. An executive order from the mayor put the kibosh on newsstands, bus shelters, and LinkNYC alcohol ads, sponsorship or branding. The city doesn’t expect to lose any revenue as a result of the ban. (Patch)

What’s going on with the hundreds of “unfounded” rape cases in Queens? The 14.2% of reported rapes in Queens being unfounded is significantly higher than the city’s other boroughs. (QNS)

The problem with the city’s plan to divert L train riders to the J and M trains is that the J and M trains are just as reliable as they’ve ever been. Overnight Monday a switch problem brought both train lines to a halt, effectively turning the L train slowdown into a full-on East River shutdown. (Gothamist)

Today is the anniversary of the Empire State Building’s opening in 1931. A piece of trivia to unlease on unsuspecting people in your life. (GVSHP)

Speaking of trivia… tonight’s the night for JOHN TRVIALTA at Parklife:

Amazon is still coming to Queens but in the form of a new distribution center in Woodside. (The City)

Bronx Councilmember Andy King was accused of sexual harassment for the second time in two years. King is refusing to cooperate with the City Council. (Patch)

Billionaires’ Row is missing something significant. Billionaires. Nearly half of the apartments are unsold, including some buildings seven years old that remain half empty. (Curbed)

Take a look, because there are new renderings of Brooklyn’s Wegmans. (6sqft)

The Queens Library got a six-month extension on their Court Square lease to remain in the building through March 31, 2020. (LIC Post)

The NYPD found a new way to make biking or walking over the Brooklyn Bridge a nightmare. (Streetsblog)

What’s that tree outside your building? There’s a map for that. The New York City Street Tree Map is the world’s most accurate and detailed map of a city’s street trees. (Viewing NYC)

The art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

Nomiki Konst is under fire for questionable practices and payments during her Public Advocate campaign and is accused of being a “plan from the right.” You’d be forgiven if you couldn’t remember her or her campaign, she only garnered 2% of the vote. Konst’s campaign manager came forward about questionable donations, which were publicly matched, and even more questionable invoices. Konst has attempted to distance herself from the potential scandal, but she served as her own treasurer, which makes her legally responsible for her campaign’s financial system. (Politico)

Soon your apartment may be powered by poop! No, we’re not talking about your roommate. (Gothamist)

An appellate court upheld the city’s measles vaccination mandate on Monday, denying a request for a temporary restraining order by a group of anti-vaxxer parents as the number of confirmed cases in New York City rose to 423. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With all the measles talk going around, you’re not alone if you’re wondering if you should get yourself a booster shot as an adult. (NY Times)

Story update. Remember how the Board of Elections put all the city’s voter rolls online for anyone to look at? Well, that’s over. The BOE realized that maybe posting all of our names, addresses and party affiliations online wasn’t the best idea. (NY Times)

The MTA will begin support for ApplePay in the “early summer,” as the OMNY system is scheduled to go live on some 4, 5, and 6 train stops on May 31. (Engadget)

The latest city landmark debate is over Tin Pan Alley, the birthplace of popular music. The conversation made a surprising turn towards some of the racism expressed in songs created there. (Curbed)

The “NOT GONNA SUCK YOUR DICK” graffiti tag is getting attention. (Bowery Boogie)

Featured walk: The essential Upper West Side. (GoRoam)

Where to go if you want to eat a burger at the bar by yourself. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 29, 2019 – The “Here Comes Another Disease We Have to Worry About” Edition

We have begun the era of the L Train Slowdown, there’s a struggle for control of Governor’s Island, Pete Davidson moves in with his mom, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the late night subway diversions you can expect this week. (Subway Changes)

Rockefeller Center is turning into a sculpture park for Frieze New York. Tell that to your friend that wants to drag you up to Storm King. (Untapped Cities)

Are the NYPD’s gang raids about justice or vengeance? A new report from CUNY Law Professor Babe Howell shows most of the people caught in gang raids in the Bronx were not accused of violence. Many of the arrested’s offenses were already resolved or dismissed at the state level. (Gothamist)

Great to hear that we have another horrid disease to worry about. Chagas disease, the “kissing bug,” which is usually never found North of South Carolina. Climate change? What climate change? (Patch)

The state’s budget is at the heart of the constant back-and-forth between the state’s legislature and the governor. Queens Assemblymember Brian Barnwell is looking to change that with a proposed constitutional amendment that will wrestle some of the control away from the governor. (Gothamist)

“What do those hawks that fly around the city eat?” Well this one ate a damn pigeon in broad daylight while standing on top of a car. (Viewing NYC)

The city abandoned plans to bring 200 dockless bikes to Coney Island. Locals were worried that allowing bikes to be stashed anywhere would be chaos, even for a neighborhood nicknamed ‘Sodom by the Sea.’ (Brooklyn Paper)

How “protected” could a bike lane be if the only protection is some paint? (Streetsblog)

A look at the nine different bills that could change how rent works in New York state. (amNY)

This week’s high score violation points among the nine restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is 99. (Patch)

The 2019 Astoria outdoor dining guide. Make a note for when you find yourself in Astoria this summer with no idea where to eat. (We Heart Astoria)

BABY LEMUR! (Wildlife Conservation Society)

The Lit. Bar is open, and the Bronx finally has a bookstore. (Curbed)

How much would you be willing to pay for a used MTA garbage can? Bet it’s not $375! (Gothamist)

RIP Michael Fesco, whose gay clubs were trendsetters in Manhattan and Fire Island. (NY Times)

The man who allegedly threw a cup on urine on two MTA workers has been arrested. Still super gross. (NBC New York)

New York Archdiocese named 115 priests and five deacons who were accused of sexually abusing a child. (NY Times)

The Daily Meal’s 101 best pizzas in the nation include 29 NYC pizzas. Not #1, which makes the whole list suspect. (Patch)

How New York is this beer? It’s literally made from bagels. (6sqft)

Ever move back in with your parents after a bad breakup? Pete Davidson bought a $1.3 million house with his mom on Staten Island. (The Real Deal)

It would be more surprising if the L Train Slowdown happened flawlessly. The problems with the slowdown started 30 minutes before the slowdown did. Before the trains were expected to arrive, the first train took 40 minutes. Eventually, the MTA hid their shame by taking their countdown clocks offline. But really, it the L train service any worse than what the MTAs been shoveling our way for years? (Gothamist)

It wasn’t a total disaster of a weekend, but let’s not get our hopes up too high. (amNY)

There’s a block in Jamaica where it appears the raccoons have taken over. Welcome to Trash Panda City. (Patch)

A look at the history of 143 East Houston, from church to fight club to Sunshine Cinema to wrecking ball. (Ephemeral New York)

Of New York City’s 10,000 bodegas, 4-6,000 of them are owned by Yemeni-Americans. In 2017, they closed their shows to protest President Trump’s travel ban. Now they’re taking a stand against the New York Post. (NY Times)

There’s a power struggle over who can control the fate of Governor’s Island as former Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen, Mayor de Blasio’s point person for his real estate initiatives, seemed to have pushed out Michael Samuelian, the President and CEO of the Trust for Governors Island, in a political power play. (Politico)

If you’re registered to vote and live in the city, the city’s Board of Elections has posted your name, address, and political party affiliation online. (WNYC)

Sick of tapas? Where to eat when you’re sick of being told to order 2-3 small plates each. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for December 4, 2018 – The “Legalize Weed to Save the Subways” Edition

City Hall is in chaos over Mayor de Blasio’s botched firing, parents are calling the DOE’s desegregation plans racist, the 7 train’s new signals aren’t helping, and other uplifting stories in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Bill de Blasio, absentee mayor. (NY Times)

Are you ready for NYPD tactical drones? (NY Post)

The 10 worst dishes of the year, including one sandwich from Arby’s, from Eater’s senior critic Robert Sietsema.

Could legal weed save our subways? (NY Times)

12 new public art installations to pair with a hot drink of your choosing. (Untapped Cities)

Santacon is this Saturday, starting at 10am. In a defensive move, the LIRR, Metro North, and NJ Transit have all banned alcohol consumption. If you need to be on a train that day, may the odds be ever in your favor. (Gothamist)

With Santacon descending onto the unwilling city this Saturday, here are a list of the bars to avoid. (Time Out)

Board of Elections Executive Director Michael Ryan enjoyed nine undisclosed trips paid for by Election Systems and Software, makers of the ballot scanning machines that plagued the city on Election Day. He never received the necessary waiver from the city’s Conflicts of Interest Board to sit on the conpany’s board of advisors. (Gothamist)

George R.R. Martin: pizza critic? (Gothamist)

The 10 biggest real estate projects coming to NYC. (The Real Deal)

The Staten Island NYPD officers Kyle Erickson and Elmer Pastran, accused of planting pot in a black teenager’s car, have, surprise surprise, a history of accusations of racial profiling. (Gothamist)

The Apollo Theater is expanding for the first time since 1934. The foundation that oversees the Apollo will take over the Victoria and open 99 and 199 seat performance spaces and should open in 2020. (NY Times)

“The richest man in America, who’s a direct competitor, has just been handed $3 billion in subsidies. I’m not asking for money or a tax rebate. Just leave me alone.” -Strand owner Nancy Bass Wyden (6sqft)

Thanks to a new legislation, Uber and Lyft drivers will be paid at least minimum wage. (NY Post)

Upset about the Amazon Long Island City deal? You could install the “Black Amazon for Me” Chrome extension, but we all know you won’t. (amNY)

The 7 trains brand new signals, installed late and over budget, weren’t installed optimally. At this point, is anyone surprised that the MTA spent too much money and took too much time to poorly install signals that haven’t helped? (amNY)

Squibb Bridge was installed in 2013 to connect the Brooklyn Promenade to Brooklyn Nridge Park, but the last five years have been full of closures, structural problems, and a lawsuit. The bridge is going to be replaced by 2020. (Curbed)

As we’re hitting the home stretch of 2018, we could be looking at a new record low number of homicides. Despite the downward trend, rape complaints continue to increase, following a two year trend. (amNY)

Parents are calling the DOE’s desegregation plan racist, which shows just how complicated this situation is. (NY Post)

What the hell is going on in City Hall and why can’t the mayor get his administration under control? (NY Post)

Everything to know about the restaurants in the Hudson Yards. (Thrillist)

The first map of Central Park for people with disabilities or otherwise “limited mobility” is now available. (West Side Rag)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.