The Briefly for July 28, 2020 – The “Someone Knows Your Pandemic Secret” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Please shut up, the shifting definition of “bar food,” the most checked out book from the NYPL, new restaurant openings, and more

Today – Low: 78˚ High: 92˚
Rain in the evening.

The New York Liberty and Seattle Storm have set the bar for National Anthem protests. Rather than take a knee, both teams walked off the court completely. After a 26 second silence in honor of Breonna Taylor, the teams left. Will anyone else step up or will the Liberty reign as the most badass team in NY? (Lam Thuy Vo for BuzzFeed News)

How to move a couch in or out of a small apartment. (Zachary Soloman for StreetEasy)

Our tailors know our dirty little pandemic secret. We all got fat. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

How to get into Gramercy Park, the most exclusive park in the city, where only 383 keys exist for its locks. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Busking is tough. Busking during a pandemic is even tougher. Now, imagine busking while carrying around a 900-pound piano. (Alex Vadukul and September Dawn Bottoms for NY Times)

An occupational therapist makes the argument that students should be learning outdoors this fall. (Lisa Raymond-Tolan for Chalkbeat)

Elizabeth Street Garden’s Executive Director Joseph Reiver offers up the Elizabeth Street Garden for schools to use. (Joseph Reiver For Bowery Boogie)

Wish the city was still open despite the pandemic? They tried keeping things open to keep up New Yorkers’ spirits. It didn’t go great for the city. (Laura Collins-Hughes for NY Times)

There’s a state law preventing public employees from striking, but NYC public school teachers are devising ways to push back if forced to teach in-person classes in the fall. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

This will be the first year that on 9/11, the names of the victims will not be read by members of their families. (NY1)

All abord the sludge boat! With Covid-19 in our poops, the boat that carries those poops away from the city is one of the most important boats in the city. (Roger Clark for NY1)

Apartment Porn: It’s $9.9 million on the Upper East Side, 5,000 square feet, nearly 21-foot tall ceilings, a 40-foot garden, and a private parking garage. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

What is food? While this is a dumb question, at this point the State Liquor Authority is making me wonder what is even food. The constantly shifting definition of what food can be served with alcohol from the SLA is maddening. Let us have our booze or don’t, but don’t make me order a sandwich with my shot. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Farewell to La Caridad 78, a Chinese-Cuban restaurant that’s been open for 52 years on the Upper West Side is closing for good. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Le Sia, the Chinese-Cajun restaurant in the East Village. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Farewell to the Rusty Knot in the West Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Chumley’s in the West Village, two years shy of its centennial. There was an auction for most of what was inside the bar, but the auction was canceled, further confusing the situation. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Photos: A look at Saturday’s Unite NY 2020 rally with the Street Riders, Warriors in the Garden, and the Black Chef Movement, which marched from Cadman Plaza in Brooklyn to Times Square and beyond. (Emmy Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

“New York’s recovery won’t be demonstrated by restoring the city to peak car traffic. Peak traffic never reflected New York’s full potential before the pandemic, it limited it. A car-based recovery would suck the oxygen out of the city and suffocate the city. Normal in New York is founded on the principle of independent transportation and the freedom of not needing a car to live and work in the city.”
-Janette Sadik-Khan, former NYC transportation commissioner, Why The Pandemic Represents A Historic Opportunity For NYC Streets, for Gothamist

A new memorial at the Williamsburg waterfront pays homage to almost 200 Black people who have been killed by police or have died fighting against racial injustice. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Riddle me this: When you Google “Waterbury Metro-North,” did the official MTA site read “Flirtatious Anal Dildo For Cock Hungry Blonde Slut?” (David Brand for Queens Eagle)

Will you please shut the hell up? Noise complaints are up 300% since February. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Queens, what’s up? Why has half of Queens not responded to the Census? (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Maybe it’s time to address the Native American in a loincloth on New York City’s official seal? (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

This one went right under my nose. A federal judge blocked the NYCLU from releasing the NYPD disciplinary records, but on the same day, ProPublica released a searchable database of the disciplinary records. ProPublica says they were allowed to post the database because they aren’t involved in the union lawsuit challenging the release of the records. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Twenty-seven New York City bars and restaurants on Sunday were cited by state inspectors for social distancing and other coronavirus-related violations. The state hasn’t released the list of bars and restaurants. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo is on top of the NYPL’s list of most checked out books during the lockdown. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

“They send me their keys and say, ‘Pack it up and put it in storage and we’ll figure it out later.’ There are so many people in flux.” Vacancy rates are growing throughout the city and how it could put the city’s rent regulation in jeopardy. (Greg David for The City)

19 new restaurant openings you should know about. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 14, 2020 – The “AOC vs Cuomo, Round 2” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The AG looks at the NYPD’s subway fare evasion, how Tiffany’s moved hundreds of millions in jewlery, the head of Brooklyn’s democrats resigns, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 48˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

How do you move hundreds of millions of dollars in view of the public in NYC without getting robbed? Very carefully. Here’s the story of how Tiffany’s moved everything in its store overnight. (James Barron for NY Times)

Attorney General Letitia James announced on Monday that her office would investigate the NYPD and if its fare evasion policing in the subways has illegally targeted New Yorkers of color. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The winners and losers of the Queens bus network redesign. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Cuomo’s AirTrain is about to hit a new obstacle: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

There are thirteen million registered voters in New York state, with one million designated as “inactive,” and whose names were not on the voter rolls at election sites, which is a violation of the 14th Amendment and the National Voting Rights Act of 1993 according to a federal judge. While it may seem trivial, remember that the Queens DA race was decided by 55 votes. Moving forward, all registered voters’ names will be available at polling sites. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Information on how to register to vote.

The leader of the Brooklyn Democratic Party, Frank Seddio, is stepping down amid concerns about the party’s and his own finances. Seddio is facing $2.2 million in lawsuits and the party’s cash reserves have dwindled from $505,000 in 2013 to $32,800 in 2019. (Aidan Graham and Kevin Duggan for amNewYorkMetro)

Photos: When it comes to the city’s skies, birds usually get all the attention. Don’t forget the city’s bats. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

RIP Matthew Maher, owner of McSorley’s since the 60s. The bar is staying in the family, daughter Teresa Maher de a Haba is the owner now. (EV Grieve)

Here are the top ten checked out books in the NYPL’s history. You’ll notice a theme running through the list. “Goodnight Moon” did not make the list do to a personal vendetta against the book by children’s librarian Anne Carroll Moore. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Have you seen “The Geographic Center of NYC” in Woodside on the corner of 58th Street and Queens Boulevard? Besides being a cool piece of trivia it’s also completely wrong. If this isn’t the place, where is it? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

If your usual subway station is outdoors, the winters can be brutal. A century ago, the IRT provided potbelly stoves in stations for its riders to stay warm while waiting for the train. (Ephemeral New York)

Signal problems ruined about four out of every five morning commutes in 2019, according to a new Riders Alliance analysis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The L train showdown is running ahead of schedule and should be completed by April, but not without some weekend closures. The MTA announced the weekends of January 17, February 14, and March 20 with closures from 8th Av to Broadway Junction. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

In addition to the L construction, the MTA announced emergency overnight construction was necessary on the G train this week through Friday night from midnight to 1:30am. (Greenpointers)

On a dry day, the MTA pumps 13 million gallons of water from its system. Monday’s water main break added half a million gallons to that, causing chaos on the 4, 5, 6, A, B, and C lines. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s time to declare the days of the cooking competition celebrity chef over. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It started as an argument between two dads about their kids near Dyker Park, but it turned into a double stabbing. One was stabbed in the chest and neck and the other was stabbed in the leg. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

In terms of housing and transportation costs, NYC ranks tenth in the nation, right after Houston but right before Minneapolis-St Paul. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Baby Yoda has a mural in the East Village. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The plan to rezone Bushwick hit a possibly fatal roadblock Monday after city officials and local politicians failed to reach an agreement on affordable housing requirements. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The de Blasio administration testified at a 2019 City Council meeting that they did not have information about who was riding the heavily subsidized NYC Ferry system. The mayor used his insistence that the boats were being used by low-income New Yorkers as justification to dramatically expand the ferry system. It was all a lie, because the city’s Economic Development Corporation had already conducted two rider surveys that showed the median income of riders was over $100,000. For each rider on the ferry that pays $2.75, the city pays $9.34. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Vans opened Skate Space 198, a free indoor skatepark right off the Jefferson stop in Bushwick. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYCHA residents filed about 59,770 bug infestation complaints in the first nine months of 2019, according to the Legal Aid Society. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What’s the best pizza in NYC? In honor of National Pizza Week, Patch asked politicians, comedians, and Broadway stars where to get their favorite slice. It’s mostly unconventional picks for the city’s best, even if Chuck Schumer’s pick is one of the closest pizza places to his apartment. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mama’s Too, on the list, is rolling out a meatball parm that is already being described as “the city’s best meatball parm.” (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The Briefly for January 3, 2020 – The “Your Choice of Subway Seat is Always Wrong” Edition

Today’s daily NY news digest: The weekend’s subway changes, sales in Trump buildings fall behind the rest of the city, revisiting Di Fara pizza, Manhattan’s hottest restaurants and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 49˚
Light rain until morning, starting again in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 52˚

Lance at Subway Weekender has retired his blog detailing the weekend’s subway delays. I’m working on either finding a replacement or doing this work myself. In the meantime, check the MTA’s giant list of everything happening to avoid being stranded by the trains this weekend.

Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero is modeled on a Swedish approach that views all deaths as preventable. If that’s the case why did the deaths of pedestrians, motorists, and cyclists increase in 2019? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

There’s an unlikely place to find the city’s history: postcards. (John Freeman Gill for NY Times)

What is the best subway seat? This meme lasted less than a day before de Blasio and Bloomberg ruined the fun. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The Times has the best answer. Your answer is obviously wrong. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

A record collection that rivals the one maintained by the Library of Congress sits in Tribeca needs a new home. (Derek K. Norman for NY Times)

David Hay, the deputy chief of staff to schools Chancellor Richard Carranza, was fired after he was arrested for allegedly trying to arrange sex with an underage boy online. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

Turns out David Hay, hired by the Department of Education, never received a completed background investigation. The Department of Investigation’s Background Investigation Unit has backlog of thousands of files. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

6 crucial ways New York City’s landscape will change in 2020. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Cardell Gadsden, a corrections officer from Rikers Island, was arrested after he allegedly murdered his uncle Steven Gadsden on the Upper West Side on Thursday. Gadsden was suspended without pay. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The 79th Street Boat Basin is the only spot in the city where houseboats can dock year-round. At the moment there’s room for 33 boats and there is a 14-year waitlist for a lease. The Department of Parks is planning a $90 million renovation to triple capacity with construction starting late 2021 or early 2022. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The city’s laws require employers to provide employees with lactation areas, but that doesn’t seem to matter to the NYPD, according to a new lawsuit. Five women are suing the NYPD for forcing them to pump breast-milk in rooms full of garbage bed bugs, their cars, and bathrooms. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Lasagna. Is this really going to be 2020’s food trend? We can survive anything after the 2019 horny chicken parm craze. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Video: Think you’ve got what it takes to keep up with a Rockette? You don’t. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Following a rash of anti-Semitic violence in recent weeks, Brooklyn elected officials are calling for dialogue and camaraderie between the borough’s black and Jewish populations. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Brooklyn House of Detention officially closed on Thursday. The remaining 390 detainees moved to other facilities, including Rikers Island. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Ok Kang, 70, is the first pedestrian in the city killed by a driver in 2020 on Northern Boulevard, the “New Boulevard of Death.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A man was caught on video literally trying to grab a sleeping woman on the subway and carry her off the train. The man, Sonny Alloway, was arrested and claims to have been attacked on the street multiple times since the video went public and offered $5,000 to anyone who attacked him if they can knock him out in a boxing match. For $5,000 I might consider giving it a try! (Brooklyn Baldwin for The Root)

The annoyances and adoration of Di Fara pizza. (Michael Fiorito for Red Hook Star-Revue)

All buses on the B44 SBS route are now equipped with the transit agency’s new Automated Bus Lane Enforcement system, issuing fines to cars caught illegally in the bus lane. Doesn’t it defeat the purpose of the system if the MTA announces that its use is limited to the B44, M14, and M15? (Scott Unman for Brooklyn Eagle)

The NY Post continues to be the NY Post. Offensive, exploitative, and I am 100% here for Gothamist shitting on the worst publication in the city. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

NY Yankees Pitcher Domingo German will miss 63 games after accepting a suspension for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend last September. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

NYC Ferry’s ridership was up by 32% in 2019. The increase includes the new Lower East Side and Soundview routes. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Farrell’s Bar and Grill is one of Brooklyn’s oldest bars, dating back to 1933. The biggest change might be the bar’s signature styrofoam cups gave way when the city banned them. Two Brooklynites are raising funds to produce a documentary about the bar that hasn’t changed despite the changes to the city around it. (Scott Unman for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Sales at Trump-branded condos continue to fall behind the rest of Manhattan. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The hottest restaurants in Manhattan, January 2020 edition. (Stefanie Tuder and Serena Dai for Eater)