The Briefly for March 25, 2020 – The “Beneath the Lowest Possible Expectations” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on COVID-19, the NYPD begins to call out sick, a bodega delivery app, Cuomo vs Trump is coming to a head, how to support music venues, and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 48˚
Possible drizzle in the afternoon.

The governor demanded the mayor ban cars on city streets to give pedestrians more room and the mayor’s response would be laughable if we could all stop saying “this is so crazy” for just a minute. The mayor will shut down 10 streets with a maximum of two per borough for pedestrian use. Which two streets in each borough? The mayor announced no specifics. Once again, Mayor de Blasio manages to crawl beneath the lowest possible expectations. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

What do you do when someone tests positive for COVID-19 but doesn’t require intensive medical care? The city is grappling with how to encourage physical distancing for the 57,000 homeless people. At the moment, patients are being sent back to the shelter system for isolation. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Over 100 employees of the New York Police Department have tested positive for the coronavirus and nearly 7% of cops have called out sick. It was less than two days ago that TMZ ran the headline “Cops Across The Country Aren’t Scared Of Coronavirus, Used To Danger” (Christopher Mathias for HuffPost)

To add to our current dystopia, the NYPD will be cruising around the city blaring a PSA on social distancing. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Video: One day we’ll look back at this moment and ask “what it even real,” and thankfully we’ll have video evidence, like videos like this bike ride over the Brooklyn Bridge to prove it actually happened. (ActionKid)

New York City from 1993 to 2019, through the camera of Grégoire Alessandrini. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The USNS Comfort, the floating hospital with 1,200 doctors and 12 operating rooms, is “on its way” to the city, but it won’t arrive until mid-April and its focus will be treating non-coronavirus patients, freeing up space in hospitals for COVID-19 patients. (Matt Fink for Bushwick Daily)

NYC Taxi & Limousine Commission is asking taxi and ride-share drivers to deliver food to senior citizens who need to stay home. The city is offering $15 an hour plus gas and tolls, which isn’t much but it’s something. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Con Edison has announced it has ceased service shutoffs over non-payment, waived new late-payment charges, and suspended fees for customers who fail to grant access to their properties during the coronavirus pandemic. (Robert Pozarycki for Gay City News)

Two things we need at a time like this, both produced in the same place: whiskey and hand sanitizer. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Now there’s a bodega delivery app. Enter My Bodega Online. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Where’s the state on rent cancellation? There’s a push for it, but Cuomo’s MIA on it. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo has the attention of the nation for his leadership. How did we get here? (Jesse McKinley and Shane Goldmacher for NY Times)

With attention, Cuomo has also become Trump’s latest target in Trump’s never-ending quest to convince us that he, the Emporer, is wearing clothes. (Asawin Suebsaeng, Erin Banco, and Sam Stein for The Daily Beast)

The federal government is sending New York 4,000 ventilators, which is only about 25,000 shy of what the state needs. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The bad news is that we haven’t flattened the curve. The worse news is that COVID-19 has an attack rate five times the national rate in New York and it’s only gonna get worse. There is no good news. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Okay, a tiny bit of good news. With everyone staying at home and not taking cars, carbon monoxide emissions are below 50% of their typical levels. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Congrats Queens, you’re winning the which borough has the most cases of coronavirus competition. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

Manhattan State Senator Brad Hoylman is calling for an end on gay blood donations. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

If you’re out of work, these restaurants are offering free or affordable meals. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Help Main Street aggregates restaurant gift cards in one place, even if it’s missing a very large swath of the city. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Photos: We’re nearing I Am Legend territory. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

All of the MTA’s transactions are going to be conducted by MetroCard vending machines, whenever possible. Remember when we were scared of robots taking jobs? (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

If you’re worried that Prospect Park is too crowded, you can take a detour to Green-Wood Cemetery for a moment of serenity away from the living. The cemetery is extending its visiting hours to help prevent you from dying of boredom inside your apartment. (Andrew Cotto for NY Times)

300 of the city’s inmates are scheduled for release to reduce the population density in the city’s jails. The detainees have less than a one-year sentence and were convicted of non-violent misdemeanors and whose age and health make them vulnerable. The city is eyes an additional 800 detainees for possible release. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The MTA is adjusting weekday train and bus schedules to Saturday levels to closer meet the city’s current demand. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

With an occupancy rate as low as 15%, hotels across the city are beginning to temporarily close. (Serena Tara for Bedford + Bowery)

New York City’s teachers union said Tuesday the city health department put educators and students at risk, prior to the city’s system-wide shutdown, by not evenly applying a closure policy for individual schools when a staff member contracted the coronavirus. (Madina Touré for Politico)

David Rockwell, the architect and Tony-winning show designer, talks about the stories and history behind his favorite theaters. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The best ways you can help New York City’s struggling music venues. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The College of Staten Island’s dorms are being emptied of students to become a makeshift hospital. Students who can’t easily find somewhere else to live are being offered rooms in the dorms of other CUNY schools. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

If you’re in self-quarantine with another person, are they a good chef? Here’s what it’s like to self-quarantine with a Michelin-starred chef. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for December 12, 2019 – The “New Subway Signals Have Been Foiled by Snow” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: LIC gets a Trader Joe’s, a plan to punish bad drivers in the NYPD, the Javits center construction is set to be mostly complete by the spring, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 35˚
Clear throughout the day.

With four Republican state senators not seeking re-election in 2020, the path is open for the state’s Democrats to form a supermajority. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Is there room in NYC for this Frankenstein’s monster of wafer-thin pizza? We accepted Detroit-style, we’d even begrudgingly allow Chicago-style to come in to the city, we we’re hot about Rhode Island-style, but this? Has pizza science finally gone too far? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There are calls for Mayor de Blasio to cancel SantaCon. While SantaCon being an event sponsored by the mayor’s office, there is a petition you can sign. (EV Grieve)

Columbia University made a promise 14 years ago to create a new public school in exchange for a 49-year rent-free lease on a piece of land. Imagine the surprise when Columbia presented a plan to build a 400-foot-tall residential tower on that land. Columbia has been slowly expanding its footprint and the neighborhood is justifiably worried. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

People move to NYC every day, so every day it’s useful to have a link that answers the question “what’s a bodega?” (Lauren Paley for StreetEasy)

The 7 train’s new signal communication was foiled on Wednesday by… some snow and slush. Yup. The MTA spent $800 million on new signals and there’s a “known phenomenon” that’s been known about since March. When a transponder malfunctions due to snow or slush, the train essentially becomes “lost” to the MTA’s computers and its speed is reduced from 50 mph to 25 mph. Very reassuring. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

New York City, get ready to be REMEd. Of course REME is the new Racially and Ethnically Motivated Extremism unit of the NYPD targeting far-right and extremist hate groups like The Proud Boys or Atomwaffen Division. This comes in response to the shootings in New Jersey. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Turns out, those no-doors, dangle-your-feet-over-NYC-for-maximally-impressive-content- helicopter experiences may be pretty unsafe — by design. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

Anti-violence programs across Coney Island are getting $850,000 in city funding to address an uptick in gun violence in the community, starting with gaps in social services. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A remote starting feature on a Lexus caused the death of 21-year-old Michael Kosanovich last week on 148th St in South Jamaica. Kosanovich was crushed between the Lexus and another car when the Lexus rolled forward after being started. Pedestrians were able to push the car off of him, but the car slipped and pinned him between the cars for a second time. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Former President Clinton visited Bed-Stuy’s Cornerstone Baptist Church to check out the energy-efficient upgrades the church was able to install thanks to a commitment from the Clinton Global Initiative University. (Raymond Hagans for The Brooklyn Reader)

The latest episode of the What’s The [DATA] Point? podcast takes a look at the $28.8 billion cumulative four-year budget gap for New York between 2020 and 2023. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

From the team behind the excellent pizza and wine restaurant Ops comes Leo, a new pizza place in Williamsburg split between a cafe/slice shop and a restaurant. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Harvey Weinstein and more than 30 actresses and former employees accusing him of sexual harassment and rape reached a tentative $25 million settlement that would not require Weinstein to pay a single dime out of his own pocket. The money would come from the $47 million settlement closing down the Weinstein Company. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best and worst architecture of 2019. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

A two-year-old boy was caught between a moving 2 train and the platform at Fulton Street during rush hour on Wednesday. He died at the hospital. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The Dry aged Red Hook Tavern burger at Red Hook Tavern, the gruyère fritters at Crown Shy, the Sicilian slice and regular slice at F & F Pizzeria, and the rest of Pete Wells’s top 10 dishes of 2019. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Long Island City is getting a Trader Joe’s. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

The Department of Transportation has a plan to address the insanity on the roads surrounding Essex Place, but it’s gonna take some time. Not months, but years, and by then congestion pricing will be in place. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A combination of miscommunication and faulty construction lead to the slow response to 80 homes’ basements being flooded with raw sewage on Thanksgiving weekend. (Max Parrott for amNewYork)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (Martha Schwindener for NY Times)

The construction at the Javits center is on-time, on-budget, and expected to be “substantially complete” by the spring. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The cleanup of the Newtown Creek has hit some murky waters. The EPA decided on a plan that reduces the combined sewer overflow pollution by 61% rather than an option that would eliminate it completely. Combined sewer overflow basically boils down to the neighborhoods toilets flushing directly into the creek when the sewer system is overloaded. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Interested in the city’s combined sewer overflows? You might enjoy the @combinedsewer Twitter account. It tweets when the city’s sewer system can’t handle a combination of sewage and rain and the overflow is released into the city’s waterways. (@combinedsewer)

The de Blasio administration is getting moving on actually punishing NYPD officers with parking placard for being unable to follow the law while behind the wheel of their own cars. Starting next year, NYPD officers and employees will lose their city-issued parking placard if they get too many moving violation tickets. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Whoops! A mixup meant that a dozen city classrooms didn’t receive the emergency lead-removal that were supposed to before the school year started. (Christoper Werth for Gothamist)

A calculator to help you decide if you should be renting or buying in NYC. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

The best sports bars in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for April 29, 2019 – The “Here Comes Another Disease We Have to Worry About” Edition

We have begun the era of the L Train Slowdown, there’s a struggle for control of Governor’s Island, Pete Davidson moves in with his mom, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the late night subway diversions you can expect this week. (Subway Changes)

Rockefeller Center is turning into a sculpture park for Frieze New York. Tell that to your friend that wants to drag you up to Storm King. (Untapped Cities)

Are the NYPD’s gang raids about justice or vengeance? A new report from CUNY Law Professor Babe Howell shows most of the people caught in gang raids in the Bronx were not accused of violence. Many of the arrested’s offenses were already resolved or dismissed at the state level. (Gothamist)

Great to hear that we have another horrid disease to worry about. Chagas disease, the “kissing bug,” which is usually never found North of South Carolina. Climate change? What climate change? (Patch)

The state’s budget is at the heart of the constant back-and-forth between the state’s legislature and the governor. Queens Assemblymember Brian Barnwell is looking to change that with a proposed constitutional amendment that will wrestle some of the control away from the governor. (Gothamist)

“What do those hawks that fly around the city eat?” Well this one ate a damn pigeon in broad daylight while standing on top of a car. (Viewing NYC)

The city abandoned plans to bring 200 dockless bikes to Coney Island. Locals were worried that allowing bikes to be stashed anywhere would be chaos, even for a neighborhood nicknamed ‘Sodom by the Sea.’ (Brooklyn Paper)

How “protected” could a bike lane be if the only protection is some paint? (Streetsblog)

A look at the nine different bills that could change how rent works in New York state. (amNY)

This week’s high score violation points among the nine restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is 99. (Patch)

The 2019 Astoria outdoor dining guide. Make a note for when you find yourself in Astoria this summer with no idea where to eat. (We Heart Astoria)

BABY LEMUR! (Wildlife Conservation Society)

The Lit. Bar is open, and the Bronx finally has a bookstore. (Curbed)

How much would you be willing to pay for a used MTA garbage can? Bet it’s not $375! (Gothamist)

RIP Michael Fesco, whose gay clubs were trendsetters in Manhattan and Fire Island. (NY Times)

The man who allegedly threw a cup on urine on two MTA workers has been arrested. Still super gross. (NBC New York)

New York Archdiocese named 115 priests and five deacons who were accused of sexually abusing a child. (NY Times)

The Daily Meal’s 101 best pizzas in the nation include 29 NYC pizzas. Not #1, which makes the whole list suspect. (Patch)

How New York is this beer? It’s literally made from bagels. (6sqft)

Ever move back in with your parents after a bad breakup? Pete Davidson bought a $1.3 million house with his mom on Staten Island. (The Real Deal)

It would be more surprising if the L Train Slowdown happened flawlessly. The problems with the slowdown started 30 minutes before the slowdown did. Before the trains were expected to arrive, the first train took 40 minutes. Eventually, the MTA hid their shame by taking their countdown clocks offline. But really, it the L train service any worse than what the MTAs been shoveling our way for years? (Gothamist)

It wasn’t a total disaster of a weekend, but let’s not get our hopes up too high. (amNY)

There’s a block in Jamaica where it appears the raccoons have taken over. Welcome to Trash Panda City. (Patch)

A look at the history of 143 East Houston, from church to fight club to Sunshine Cinema to wrecking ball. (Ephemeral New York)

Of New York City’s 10,000 bodegas, 4-6,000 of them are owned by Yemeni-Americans. In 2017, they closed their shows to protest President Trump’s travel ban. Now they’re taking a stand against the New York Post. (NY Times)

There’s a power struggle over who can control the fate of Governor’s Island as former Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen, Mayor de Blasio’s point person for his real estate initiatives, seemed to have pushed out Michael Samuelian, the President and CEO of the Trust for Governors Island, in a political power play. (Politico)

If you’re registered to vote and live in the city, the city’s Board of Elections has posted your name, address, and political party affiliation online. (WNYC)

Sick of tapas? Where to eat when you’re sick of being told to order 2-3 small plates each. (The Infatuation)

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