The Briefly for October 2-3, 2020 – The “Vaccinate All Your Trash Pandas” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining, indoor schooling, the Brooklyn ballot blunder, NYSC gets sued, Kora’s doughnuts go pop-up, outdoor movies, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 67˚
Possible drizzle in the morning.
This weekend – Low: 51˚ High: 67˚

If you’re one of the nearly 100,000 people who received incorrect ballots, the Board of Elections is sending you a few ballot. The Board of Elections is not doing much to earn our confidence in the last few years. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

How’d the ballots get so screwed up? Blame Phoenix Graphics, the company hired to produce the ballots, which has historically supported Republicans and was paid $4.6 million to bungle our ballots, so to speak. (Clifford Michel for The City)

A look into the Brooklyn Psychedelic Society, and no, they do not provide drugs at their meetings. (Diana Kruzman for Bedford + Bowery)

A group of assholes from the Upper West Side rallied for the mayor to remove 240 homeless New Yorkers from their neighborhood and the mayor gave them what they wanted. The plan is to move them into a new shelter in the Financial District. Now, of course, there is a new group of assholes in the Financial District demanding they be moved elsewhere. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city is launching its annual campaign to vaccinate… the population of raccoons in the city against rabies. If you find your pet eating something that looks like a brown ketchup packet filled with a pink liquid, do your best to take it away from them, but it should not be harmful to them. (Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

There are ten neighborhoods in the city with positive Covid-19 testing rates above 3%, adding Fresh Meadows and Hillcrest to the already existing list. There are seven neighborhoods, East Williamsburg, Bed-Stuy, Windsor Terrace, Brighton Beach, Crown Heights, Rego Park and Jamaica Hills whose numbers are getting close to 3%. (Alehandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

An interactive map of Covid-19 cases. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that people who refuse to wear masks will be fined up to $1,000. Does this extend to police officers? There were zero fines issued on the first day of enforcement. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The city’s plans to test 10-20% of each school every two weeks may miss large outbreaks of the virus according to a new student from NYU and recommends that half of every school be tested twice a month in order to catch outbreaks before they quickly spread out of control. (Benedict Carey, James Glanz and Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

John F. Kennedy Jr. School in Elmhurst is the first NYC school to shut down for two weeks after two positive Covid-19 cases. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

“I keep saying there appears to be a real separation between what’s happening in the neighborhoods versus what’s happening in the public schools that really do have a different constituency.” – That was Mayor de Blasio before the positive tests in Elmhurst that shut down John F. Kennedy Jr. School and 100% contradicted this sentiment. He also said “We did it!” talking about opening the schools, words he would immediately come to regret if he were capable of shame. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Before schools opened, Mayor de Blasio said that children that were unwilling or unable to be tested for Covid-19 would be moved into 100% remote learning. He has backed down on that claim. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Schools are still open across the city, but a single day spike of positive test results at 3.25% is waking people up to the realizing that it’s possible for the city to hit the 3% seven-day average tripwire that would shut down all schools. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Keep your eyes out for special pennies. Jill Magid is releasing 120,000 pennies into the world as part of her project “Tender,” in which each penny has “The body was already so fragile” engraved on their side. (Allie Conti for NY Times)

NYPD officer Eduardo Vite from East Harlem’s 25th precinct was arrested for beating and pulling a gun on his girlfriend. Vite has a history of alleged domestic violence and proven complaints of on-duty misconduct. He is facing an internal investigation and remains on the force. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The NYPD committed violations of international human rights laws during the June 4 protests, according to a new report by Human Rights Watch. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Minutes after Governor Andrew Cuomo implored local governments to rethink the role of police in public safety after mass protests against racist police brutality, Cuomo said police officers should arrest people injecting drugs on city streets during a Tuesday press conference. (Sydney Pereira and Quari Alleyne for Gothamist)

James W. Cahill, president of the New York State Building & Construction Trades Council, was indicted on racketeering and fraud charges along with ten current and former members of the steamfitters Local 638. (Benjamin Weiser and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

It’s the last few days of Century 21, if you think you’re gonna find a deal, get ready to wait in line. (NY1)

Indoor dining is (sort of) back in NYC. How nervous should you be about it? (Pete Wells for NY Times)

How to spot the risks of indoor dining. (Also Pete Wells for NY Times)

The mayor did not eat indoors on the first night of its availability. (Erika Adams for Eater)

“Overall, the restaurants where I ate, and the many others into which I popped my head during my tour, were operating well under the mandated 25% capacity. In fact, most dining rooms everywhere remained nearly empty even as their outdoor space filled up, perhaps not surprising given the exceptionally pleasant weather yesterday evening, not to mention the whole fear of catching a terrible contagious disease thing.”
-Scott Lynch, I Ate Inside A NYC Restaurant. This Is My Story for Gothamist

A last meal at Mission Chinese. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Some bars and restaurants are fighting back against the state SLA and winning, including Lucky in the East Village. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Say farewell to the Islanders, who have played their last game in Brooklyn and will return to Long Island next season. (JT Torenli for Brooklyn Eagle)

Is it possible that America’s best bathroom is in Greely Square? Maybe it’s in the JFK AirTrain station? Both have been nominated. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

“We, the undersigned WSN Fall 2020 Editorial Staff, have collectively decided to resign from Washington Square News, effective immediately. This was extensively deliberated in collaboration with 43 staff editors, and it was not a decision we enjoyed making. However, we understand that continuing to work at WSN in our current circumstance would do more harm than good, and we refuse to condone what we have seen over the past three weeks.”
-Washington Square News Staff, We’re Resigning from WSN. Here’s Why. for Washington Square News

Queens Filipino bakery Kora is having a pop-up this weekend, featuring their innovative and extremely hard to get your hands on doughnuts. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Apartment Porn: This Hell’s Kitchen condo has a rooftop pool, a pocket park, a dog run, a library, and two guest suites. Apartments start at $910k for a studio. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

New York Sports Club is being sued for fraud by the Letitia James’s Attorney General office after it illegally charged customers fees during its legally mandated Covid-19 shutdown and then failed to issue reimbursements. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

11 spots showing outdoor movies. I suggest Parklife on Wednesday nights, where you’ll find me hosting trivia before the movie, even if The Infatuation didn’t mention me I’m still linking to them! (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Christopher V. for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for April 10, 2020 – The “Bodegas and Fran Lebowitz Will Be There When Things Go to Hell” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Normplay, Cuomo doesn’t share de Blasio’s optimism, SNL works from home, Lincoln Center’s summer programming is canceled, restaurant spices, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 50˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 44˚ High: 61˚

When the Governor is begging the nation to send healthcare workers to New York, imagine how shitty you have to be to threaten to fire your employees for speaking out about bad conditions in your hospital. Instead, hospital administrators are encouraging “appropriate” social media posts with uplifting messages instead. The City Council is planning legislation to prohibit the firing of health care workers for speaking publicly about hospital conditions. (Noam Scheiber and Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

Video: It’s almost weird to see videos of people crowded into Times Square. (ActionKid)

Plans to turn Cathedral of St. John the Divine into a hospital have hit the breaks. The public story is that a leveling off in infections is the reason, but there are also tensions between the church’s leaders and Samaritan’s Purse, the company operating Central Park’s field hospitals, who hold anti-Muslim and anti-LGBTQ stances. (Liam Stock for NY Times)

New Yorkers always know that when everything goes to hell, we can count on our bodegas. (Aaron Randle for NY Times)

“Never. It didn’t even occur to me. The morning of September 11th, someone called me and said, “We’re going to Connecticut. We can pick you up. Do you want to go?” I was just shocked that anyone would want to leave. I’m not leaving. In fact, I feel that I am like the designated New Yorker. Everyone else can leave. This is beyond saddening for me, to see the town this way.” –Fran Lebowitz is never leaving New York City. (Michael Schulman for The New Yorker)

Inside Coronavirus: Chinatown Stories, a video series making an effort to bring attention and love to Chinatown and Welcome to Chinatown, a grassroots initiative to support Chinatown restaurants. (Cathy Erway for Grub Street)

If you’ve been wondering “Why are the city’s landmarks lit up blue?,” it’s for the city’s essential workers. It started at Windsor Castle in the UK last month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

In praise of making noise at 7 pm every night. (Amanda Hess for NY Times)

Everyone can submit an absentee ballot for the June 23 Democratic primary, thanks to an announcement from Governor Cuomo. (Emily Davenport for QNS)

Are you one of the 1/3 of renters in the country who didn’t pay April’s rent on time? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A look inside the U.S. Open stadium’s makeshift hospital. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

The story of how the Yankees became the Yankees, 107 years later. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Traffic is down 60% on the BQE and speeds are up 288%. Proof that when you remove cars from the streets, the remaining vehicles can travel faster. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Have you hit the point where you miss all of the city’s inconveniences? Try Normplay. Nothing will make you appreciate staying at home like re-creating the pains of living in the city. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor is feeling optimistic about relaxing the city’s quarantine at the end of May, but Governor Cuomo doesn’t share his optimism. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

PHotos: Separate, but together. Portraits of New Yorkers under quarantine. (Caroline Spivack with photos by Johnny Cirillo for Curbed)

Saturday Night Live is doing a “work from home” episode this weekend in what will surely be one of the weirdest television experiences of this pandemic. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

All of Lincoln Center’s summer programming is canceled for 2020. Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Midsummer Night Swing, and Mostly Motzart are all canceled. It’s not all bad news, they’re planning a pop-up festival for whenever we’re allowed to go outside again. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

There are a lot of dark clouds lately, but let’s discover the silver linings. (6sqft)

Looking to emulate your favorite dishes from your favorite restaurants? Here are some restaurants in the city selling their spices and seasonings. (Luke Forney for Eater)

“We’re working with Google to come up with an online mechanism that bypasses any phone certification.” -The governor is working with Google to update the state’s unemployment verification process and remove phone verification, the hardest part of completing an unemployment claim. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The New York Historical Society wants your paper and digital ephemera that document all aspects of the current crisis. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral Easter Mass is being streamed to Facebook and YouTube this year. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Hart Island, the city’s potter’s field, normally sees about 25 new bodies buried by inmates each week. Lately, it’s two dozen bodies a day and contract laborers have been brought in to perform the burials. The photography in this article is absolutely chilling. (Christopher Robbins, Sydney Pereira, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The latest slap in the face to restauranteurs and their staffs is GoFundMe making it difficult for the donated funds to be withdrawn. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Times asks “Did New Yorkers Who Fled to Second Homes Bring the Virus?” The answer is yes. (Sarah Maslin Nir and Tracey Tully for NY Times)

10 great cookbooks and cocktail books from NYC restaurants and bars. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The Briefly for March 25, 2020 – The “Beneath the Lowest Possible Expectations” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on COVID-19, the NYPD begins to call out sick, a bodega delivery app, Cuomo vs Trump is coming to a head, how to support music venues, and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 48˚
Possible drizzle in the afternoon.

The governor demanded the mayor ban cars on city streets to give pedestrians more room and the mayor’s response would be laughable if we could all stop saying “this is so crazy” for just a minute. The mayor will shut down 10 streets with a maximum of two per borough for pedestrian use. Which two streets in each borough? The mayor announced no specifics. Once again, Mayor de Blasio manages to crawl beneath the lowest possible expectations. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

What do you do when someone tests positive for COVID-19 but doesn’t require intensive medical care? The city is grappling with how to encourage physical distancing for the 57,000 homeless people. At the moment, patients are being sent back to the shelter system for isolation. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Over 100 employees of the New York Police Department have tested positive for the coronavirus and nearly 7% of cops have called out sick. It was less than two days ago that TMZ ran the headline “Cops Across The Country Aren’t Scared Of Coronavirus, Used To Danger” (Christopher Mathias for HuffPost)

To add to our current dystopia, the NYPD will be cruising around the city blaring a PSA on social distancing. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Video: One day we’ll look back at this moment and ask “what it even real,” and thankfully we’ll have video evidence, like videos like this bike ride over the Brooklyn Bridge to prove it actually happened. (ActionKid)

New York City from 1993 to 2019, through the camera of Grégoire Alessandrini. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The USNS Comfort, the floating hospital with 1,200 doctors and 12 operating rooms, is “on its way” to the city, but it won’t arrive until mid-April and its focus will be treating non-coronavirus patients, freeing up space in hospitals for COVID-19 patients. (Matt Fink for Bushwick Daily)

NYC Taxi & Limousine Commission is asking taxi and ride-share drivers to deliver food to senior citizens who need to stay home. The city is offering $15 an hour plus gas and tolls, which isn’t much but it’s something. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Con Edison has announced it has ceased service shutoffs over non-payment, waived new late-payment charges, and suspended fees for customers who fail to grant access to their properties during the coronavirus pandemic. (Robert Pozarycki for Gay City News)

Two things we need at a time like this, both produced in the same place: whiskey and hand sanitizer. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Now there’s a bodega delivery app. Enter My Bodega Online. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Where’s the state on rent cancellation? There’s a push for it, but Cuomo’s MIA on it. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo has the attention of the nation for his leadership. How did we get here? (Jesse McKinley and Shane Goldmacher for NY Times)

With attention, Cuomo has also become Trump’s latest target in Trump’s never-ending quest to convince us that he, the Emporer, is wearing clothes. (Asawin Suebsaeng, Erin Banco, and Sam Stein for The Daily Beast)

The federal government is sending New York 4,000 ventilators, which is only about 25,000 shy of what the state needs. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The bad news is that we haven’t flattened the curve. The worse news is that COVID-19 has an attack rate five times the national rate in New York and it’s only gonna get worse. There is no good news. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Okay, a tiny bit of good news. With everyone staying at home and not taking cars, carbon monoxide emissions are below 50% of their typical levels. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Congrats Queens, you’re winning the which borough has the most cases of coronavirus competition. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

Manhattan State Senator Brad Hoylman is calling for an end on gay blood donations. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

If you’re out of work, these restaurants are offering free or affordable meals. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Help Main Street aggregates restaurant gift cards in one place, even if it’s missing a very large swath of the city. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Photos: We’re nearing I Am Legend territory. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

All of the MTA’s transactions are going to be conducted by MetroCard vending machines, whenever possible. Remember when we were scared of robots taking jobs? (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

If you’re worried that Prospect Park is too crowded, you can take a detour to Green-Wood Cemetery for a moment of serenity away from the living. The cemetery is extending its visiting hours to help prevent you from dying of boredom inside your apartment. (Andrew Cotto for NY Times)

300 of the city’s inmates are scheduled for release to reduce the population density in the city’s jails. The detainees have less than a one-year sentence and were convicted of non-violent misdemeanors and whose age and health make them vulnerable. The city is eyes an additional 800 detainees for possible release. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The MTA is adjusting weekday train and bus schedules to Saturday levels to closer meet the city’s current demand. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

With an occupancy rate as low as 15%, hotels across the city are beginning to temporarily close. (Serena Tara for Bedford + Bowery)

New York City’s teachers union said Tuesday the city health department put educators and students at risk, prior to the city’s system-wide shutdown, by not evenly applying a closure policy for individual schools when a staff member contracted the coronavirus. (Madina Touré for Politico)

David Rockwell, the architect and Tony-winning show designer, talks about the stories and history behind his favorite theaters. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The best ways you can help New York City’s struggling music venues. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The College of Staten Island’s dorms are being emptied of students to become a makeshift hospital. Students who can’t easily find somewhere else to live are being offered rooms in the dorms of other CUNY schools. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

If you’re in self-quarantine with another person, are they a good chef? Here’s what it’s like to self-quarantine with a Michelin-starred chef. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!