The Briefly for January 22, 2019 – The “23 Flavors of Public Advocate to Choose From” Edition

The subways get another speed boost, the K.G.B. Spy Museum opens, how Veselka became Veselka, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Information on what to do if you are renting and have problems with your heat or hot water. (nyc.gov)

The cartoonish hook pulling performers off the stage? It originated at Miner’s Theater in the Bowery. (Ephemeral New York)

The new K.G.B. Spy Museum is now open. No, it’s not in Trump Tower, it’s on W 14th Street. (NY Times)

The MTA may as well hire the young man who keeps stealing buses and taking them on joyrides. The NYPD is assuming he’s responsible for three “borrowed” buses. (Gothamist)

Welcome to Gowanus, where the cars use the sidewalks more than the pedestrians do. (Pardon Me for Asking)

With 23 candidates, is it possible to profile all the candidates for the city’s public advocate position? The Times gives it their best with a sentence or two on each. (NY Times)

Years ago, former Mayor Ed Koch started a movie review YouTube channel. Enjoy the mayor at the movies. (YouTube)

Students at Poly Prep High School in Dyker Heights organized a walkout in protest of the blackface video which became public last week. Students claim administrators have not done enough to address the incident and this was not an isolated incident. (Gothamist)

How a 24/7 pierogi spot became the legendary Veselka. (Insider)

More than 10,000 people in NYCHA apartments were without heat or hot water on Sunday, Monday, and part of Tuesday this week. (NY Post)

A peace officer is accused of groping a woman in Chinatown. Lindell Blai was off duty at the time. (Gothamist)

The MTA continues to work to increase speeds on the subways, with the R, J, Z, and 1 trains seeing a boost with more to come. Don’t get your hopes too high, of the 320 subway signals discovered to be malfunctioning, the MTA still has 261 to fix. (NY Post)

The history of Manhattan’s defensive wall to keep out foreign invaders and how it didn’t work. Wall Street stands in its place as a reminder. (Metro)

9 things to do in the city during the worst of winter. (New York Cliché)

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The Briefly for December 17, 2018 – The “Get Ready For Metal Detectors in the Subway” Edition

Late-night subway changes, the most expensive neighborhoods, someone is sealing cats inside buckets, a federal takeover of the NYCHA has a deadline, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Whoever the hell is sealing cats inside five gallon buckets and abandoning them near trash cans on the street, you are the lowest scum on earth. This has all the makings of an urban myth, but each time the cats were saved and are with the Animal Haven shelter. (HuffPost)

21-year-old MD Rajon was the 11th cyclist killed on the road in the city in 2018. (Streetsblog)

Governor Cuomo on the L train shutdown: “New Yorkers are willing to bear the expense and the burden of change.” Right, like we had any choice about this. (NY Post)

The NYPD has found a way to make the subways even worse than the current state of the transit hellhole: metal detectors. (Gothamist)

amNewYork’s 2018 Transit Wish List is the most depressing holiday wish list of all. (amNY)

The #1 reason companies cite when deciding not to expand their offices to New York is the condition of our transportation system. (NY Times)

The 10 most expensive neighborhoods in the city. (The Real Deal)

43% of the fish purchased in the city is mislabeled, according to a new lawsuit from the NY Attorney General Barbara Underwood’s office. (NY Post)

The seemingly infinite construction on the corner of Houston and Bowery is finally coning to an end. The project started in 2004 and was scheduled to be finished by Labor Day of 2017. (Bowery Boogie)

The diary of Philip Hone, a socialite and short-termed mayor, from the 1820’s-1850’s includes the opening of NYU, the great fire of 1835, the stock market crash and shows that New Yorkers have always had some of the same thoughts and concerns. (Ephemeral New York)

A real international affair. An Argentine diplomat’s husband beat up a United Nation Worker at a drunken party at the Cuban embassy, but won’t face charges due to his wife’s diplomatic immunity. (NY Post)

Hoboken’s SantaCon did not disappoint with nearly 500 complaints, 14 arrests and four hospitalized police officers. (NY Post)

Jazmine Headley broke her silence about the December 7 incident where her child was ripped from her hands by police at a social services office in Brooklyn. (NY Post)

Leaving a traffic cone behind to keep your parking spot is an illegal but clever way to reserve your parking spot, but Ridgewood’s 104th precinct is starting to catch on. (TimesLedger)

The NYCHA has a January 31, 2019 deadline to make a deal with federal prosecutors before a federal takeover. (Politico)

New York’s flora faces a new threat from a “superbug” that hitched a ride on Christmas trees from out of state. The Spotted Lanternfly is native to Southeast Asia and could be a serious problem to the city’s parks. (NY Post)

This is how The Rockettes’ shoes are made. (Viewing NYC)

Lawmakers from Eastern Queens are arguing against congestion pricing because they say it unfairly targets city residents who live in commuter deserts. (amNY)

Colin Kroll, the CEO of HQ Trivia and co-founder of Vine, was found dead of an apparent cocaine and heroine overdose at 34 in his Manhattan apartment. (NY Times)

There is no 3 train, the F is always local in Queens, the N and Q is express-only in Manhattan and other inconveniences when it comes to the late-night subway service changes. (Subway Changes)

Unagi, a seafood restaurant with a live eel tank, claims it is helping the endangered species of eel that issuing kept in a tank to be killed and served for lunch, by popularizing the fish. Right. (Eater)

The anti-tourist guide to celebrating the holidays in NYC (StreetEasy)

Too cold outside to make it to Bryant Park for ice skating? Watch the webcam instead. (Bryant Park NYC on YouTube)

Thanks to @linesofnyc_ for today’s featured image.

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The Briefly for November 26, 2018 – The “New York’s Foam Party is Ending” Edition

What we hate most about NYC living, not snow good plowing, the styrofoam ban, late night subway changes and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes include some of the MTA’s greatest hits like “There’s No L Train,” “What Happened to The F?,” “Why Isn’t The 7 Running.” and more. (Subway Weekender)

Say goodbye to styrofoam takeout containers, cups, packing peanuts, plates, bowls, and trays as the city’s foam ban goes into effect on January 1. (Gothamist)

Do you live in the suburbs? 18% of city-dwellers said they did. (The Real Deal)

A guide to the different types of Christmas trees. (amNY)

There’s a loophole in campaign finance laws in NY that allow LLCs to act like people and donate up to $65,100 to each statewide candidate. Will the Democrats, who publicly oppose the loophole, close it? (The Real Deal)

New York’s lawsuit against the Trump Foundation can proceed, according to Justice Saliann Scarpulla. (NY Times)

The things we hate most about living in the city. (NY Post)

The unbelievable story of a dog who escaped his home in Canarsie and turned up near Tampa, FL 18 months later. (NY Post)

The Carnegie Deli is back, but only for a week to celebrate the release of Amazon’s Marvelous Mrs. Maisel season 2. (Untapped Cities)

A naked, burned body was found by kids near a Staten Island Elementary school. The NYPD is treating the incident as a homicide. (NY Post)

The map and data that shows conclusively the city completely blew it when it came to plowing during the last snowstorm. (I Quant NY)

Citi Bike added 200 electric bikes to their NYC fleet, but their batteries haven’t been able to keep up with demand. (NY Post)

Lighting By Gregory has turned into $30 Million For Gregory. (Bowery Boogie)

NYC’s original elevated trains in 1868 moved between five and ten miles an hour, which is still faster than the average speed of a Manhattan bus.

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