The Briefly for March 18, 2020 – The “Mom and Dad Are Fighting Over Quarantine” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Uber Pools are banned, NY ramps up COVID-19 testing, the Night Mayor makes a request, price gouging becomes illegal, Whole Foods needs bikers, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 53˚
Rain overnight.

Today’s free stream from the Met Opera is Puccini’s La Bohème. Be patient, as their website is being inundated with people wanting to watch.

Ridgewood’s Nowawadays is streaming every night at 8pm.

Caveat’s free programming tonight is Nerd Nite.

Governor Cuomo is the guest on today’s edition of The Daily podcast from the Times. (Michael Barbaro, produced by Austin Mitchell, Adizah Eghan and Lynsea Garrison for NY Times)

The late-night shows are off TV, but they’re not off YouTube. Colbert gave a monologue from the bathtub while wearing a suit, of course. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

We all knew this would happen. The governor and mayor had been showing a unified front against the pandemic for almost a week, which is too long for their often strained relationship. Mayor de Blasio made waves by claiming that a shelter-in-place order might be coming in the next two days, but Governor Cuomo made certain to publicly state he’s the only person that can make that order and has no plans to quarantine any city. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio was so intent on keeping city libraries open during the coronavirus outbreak that he went as far as making veiled threats about cutting their funding if they closed. What a leader. (Sally Goldenberg and Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

“Our schools are important, he said. Here’s what we heard: Our lives are not.” -An editorial from Emily James, an NYC teacher looking at the last few weeks. (Emily James for HuffPost)

How to get around NYC safely during the coronavirus pandemic. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Uber, Via and Lyft pool rides in NYC are banned. The only people who should be getting into cars together are “real couples,” according to the mayor. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

What about Access-a-Ride? The MTA has made no such ruling, despite Access-a-Ride customers being among the city’s most vulnerable. The MTA is “working on it.” (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

Ridership is down 60% on the subways and 90% on commuter trains and the MTA is seeking a $4 billion federal bailout. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

This is how we know it’s a true problem: Alternate side of the street parking has been suspended. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Here’s how takeout alcohol sales work. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

$100 a tray for Japanese Hokkaido uni. Omakase boxes starting at $50. Can luxury restaurants go takeout? (Erika Adams for Eater)

What is a restaurant? Is the corner store that mostly serves pupusas a restaurant? A close-up with Mirna’s Pupuseria in Flatbush as they face their future in our new reality. (Ligaya Mishan for NY Times)

Is it possible to govern while socially distanced? We’re getting closer and closer to the due date for the state’s budget on April 1 and assemblymembers are being told to keep their distance. (Fred Mogul and Karen De Witt for Gothamist)

It’s like August in March. The 1% are heading to the Hamptons and spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to rent houses. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

There have been a lot of comparisons to the 1918 Spanish Flu when talking about COVID-19, especially when saying that it became dormant in the summer and came back like the evil in the fall. How did NYC survive the 1918 Spanish Flu? (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Brooklyn DA will not prosecute low-level offenders to reduce the number of people exposed to COVID-19. (Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A walk down a mostly empty Broadway in Astoria. (ActionKid)

It is illegal for any store to raise the price for any product or service that could limit the spread of coronavirus by 10% or more. We can thank the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection for the new rule to prevent price gouging. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

If you can ride a bike in the city, there may be a job for you. Whole Foods is looking for cyclists to deliver groceries. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

By Thursday, the city’s capacity for COVID-19 testing will be up to 5,000 tests a day. That doesn’t mean that anyone who wants a test will get one, but it means that people who should have been tested already will finally be tested and we can move forward from there. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re working from home and the apartment feels lonely, please remember that you can still foster a dog or cat. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Four players for the Nets have tested positive for COVID-19, including Kevin Durant. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

Bandcamp is waiving their cut of sales to show support for artists. If you’ve got a favorite band and want to show some support, go buy some mp3s. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Comic book readers: Call your local shop to see if they are accommodating curbside pickup for your new books this week. (George Gene Gustines for NY Times)

Photos: You know who doesn’t care about the coronavirus? Christo and Amelia, the Tompkins Square hawks. (Laura Goggin Photography)

Some people won’t ever listen, even if it means putting their entire community’s lives at risk. The FDNY broke up a Hasidic wedding in Williamsburg on Tuesday after more than 200 people were in attendance. In the same building, a school was in session. The Times goes out of its way to state that these kinds of events are influenced by the teaching of “extremist leaders” and do not represent the Hasidic community. (Liam Stack and Nate Schweber for NY Times)

Headline: “Brooklyn Ultra-Orthodox Community Faces Spike In Coronavirus Infections, Urgent Care Center Confirms” 🤔 (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Office of Nightlife is gathering information on the impacts for workers, performers, contractors, and businesses from COVID-19-related business closures and event cancellations. Please fill out the survey. (Nightlife Mayor Ariel Palitz)

The Bowery Ballroom and Mercury Lounge have put together a GoFundMe for their 100 staff members. (GoFundMe)

Philippe G. Massoud, chef-owner of ilili and ilili Box has a GoFundMe to provide dry and canned foods, diapers and other necessities to his 130 staff and families. I’m not sure how I’m going to keep covering these GoFundMe efforts. There are hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who need help right now. (GoFundMe)

If you’re connected to a bartender or server or restaurant on social media, no doubt you’ve seen the requests for tips or support in whatever way is possible. The federal government has created out of thin air an additional $3 trillion-plus to flush into the economy. Where the hell is the help for the service industry? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Friday’s looking to be a 70-degree day. Here are the 12 largest parks in the city so you can go outside but keep your distance. (Untapped New York)

Brief hits:
RIP Carolyn Egger, killed by a driver over the weekend in Jackson Heights. The driver was not charged. (Streetsblog) | A virtual tour of the Brooklyn Museum’s ‘Studio 54: Night Magic’. (Brooklyn Based) | The fight over the Atlantic Yards is not over. (The Real Deal) | A time-lapse video of the once-in-a-decade Agave titanota’s bloom, at the New York Botanical Garden. (Viewing NYC) | The gym ban applies to the gym in your residential building. (The Real Deal) | How to digitally borrow books from the NYPL. (Time Out) | Yes, my band does have a Bandcamp page, thanks for asking. (Bad Bloom)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 13, 2019 – The “Polling at 0.11% and Not Giving Up” Edition

Corey Johnson opposes the 14th St busway, a Keith Haring work is getting restored, how much can a roommate save you, the history of Gotham, and more in today’s daily NY news digest.

Get ready for some heavy patches of rain today and through tomorrow morning. Good news, it will be clear for John Trivialta at Parklife on Wednesday night! (Patch)

After 100 years of business on the Bowery, Faerman Cash Register Co. has closed its doors for the last time. It’s not high rent that’s pushing them out, it’s real estate taxes. As a result, the family is putting the building up for sale. (Untapped Cities)

Never a person who learns from failure, the mayor says he plans on campaigning even when he doesn’t qualify for the third set of Democratic primary debates in September. The mayor received 23 out of about 20,000 votes in the Iowa “Corn Poll” last week. (Politico)

A video surfaced of the horrific car crash on Coney Island Avenue in Midwood that resulted in the killing of Park Slope’s Jose Alzorriz. This is the second death on Coney Island Avenue in a month and one of 578 crashes in the last year. The mayor was distracted from eating corn dogs and walking around Iowa while polling at 0% support long enough to give a statement. (Gothamist)

Ten secrets of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor when he’s actually in the city. (Untapped Cities)

Patience and Fortitude, the lions outside the New York Public Library, are going to be laser cleaned and have their cracks repaired (the cement ones). (6sqft)

Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson story “The Lightning Thief” is getting a limited run on Broadway that starts in September and runs through January. Also headed to broadway? “Diana,” a musical about Princess Diana will begin in the same theater as “The Lightning Theif” in March. (NY Times)

87 percent of NYCHA apartments went without heat or hot water at some point last winter. Believe it or not, that number represents a decrease from the previous winter. (Curbed)

Layleen Cubilette-Polanco’s family is suing the city for placing her in solitary confinement when her medical conditions should have forbidden the Department of Corrections from placing her there. (Patch)

We are a month away from the 25th anniversary of ‘Friends’ dominating the city, so the release of a Central Perk LEGO set shouldn’t be a surprise. (6sqft)

Should you move to New York City? Probably not. (Curbed)

The city’s annual topless parade is August 25, one day before Women’s Equality Day, which starts on W 58th and Eighth Ave and continues to Bryant Park. (amNY)

Keith Haring’s “Crack is Wack” on Harlem River Drive in East Harlem is being restored. (6sqft)

“When you see someone being ableist to you or someone else, don’t ignore it, correct it. And for the record, if you see a complete stranger who is also differently-abled, it’s not weird to say “hi.” In a world full of abled body people it’s nice to know that there is someone just like us.” -Sasha Bogen, 2019 graduate of Achievement First Brooklyn High School (Kings County Politics)

The NYPD admitted it subpoenas Google and uses location data collected from Google Maps and other Google applications in order to locate suspects or witnesses. (Gothamist)

Veggie Castle is expanding into Brooklyn. (Time Out)

Arthur Schwartz is the public face of the 14th St busway opposition and protests are scheduled on Wednesday outside of his W. 12th St home. (The Villager)

Corey Johnson, who has regularly stated he wants to break the city’s car culture came out in opposition of the 14th St busway. (amNY)

Roommates in NYC. Can having one save you money? How much can they save you? Let’s find out. (Curbed)

Where did the “Gotham” nickname come from? It’s an insult lobbed at the city by Washington Irving of “Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle” fame. (StreetEasy)

The mayor is questioning the circumstances surrounding Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide. (NY Times)

Should government-run and -affiliated pension funds divest from fossil fuel company stock? A look at the politicians pro and anti divestment. (Gotham Gazette)

After her defeat in the Queens DA primary, what’s next for Tiffany Cabán? (NY Times)

Prescriptions for free fruits and vegetables? Yes, as apart of the Pharmacy to farm program. (Huff Post)

Williamsburg’s L’industrie Pizzeria sits atop Eat This, Not That’s list of the best pizza in the state of New York. (Patch)

The best new restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for May 24, 2019 – The “Human Rights Violations by the MTA” Edition

How to get around and what to eat and drink Memorial Day weekend, the ACC is looking for people to hang out with dogs, commuting from the suburbs sucks, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Everything you need to know about getting around in NYC during Memorial Day weekend, including all of the normal weekend disruptions that bleed through to Monday. (6sqft)

If you love dogs but can’t have one in your apartment, here’s a compromise. The city’s Animal Care Centers is looking for people who take a shelter dog out for some fun for a few hours. Go to the park to play, go for a long walk with your new best friend, go for a car ride, or a dog-friendly restaurant, it doesn’t matter. Give one of these dogs a break from shelter life. It’s all part of the “BoroughBreak” program, which starts up this weekend. (amNY)

This is the jackass pulling the emergency brakes on the subways. (amNY)

The MTA is on the verge of a state human rights violation by constantly failing to install elevators. In the words of the judge “There has to be action, no more talk.” (Gothamist)

A Brooklyn Community Board bought a $26k SUV, which just so happened to have its own parking space across the street from the board’s manager Gerald Esposito. Why did they buy it? “To go different places.” (The City)

Your guide to the food at Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

The Queens Zoo has two new fluffy babies in Brienne and Benny, a pair of Andean bears. (amNY)

What makes you a regular? Weekly visits? A drink named after you? “The usual?” (NY Times)

Cellino & Barnes, the comedy, is coming to Park Slope. (Viewing NYC)

“When one attorney refused to acquiesce, respondent Barnes called him a ‘f—ing coward and vowed that respondent Barnes ‘will remember this.” Here’s a history on the infamous breakup of two NYC famous lawyers. (The Cut)

The Port Authority is drowning in people and buses and something has to change. (Curbed)

If you’re flying out of Newark this weekend, sorry to hear it, but here’s a list of where to eat in EWK. (Eater)

It’s Memorial Day weekend. Let’s start worrying about hurricanes. (Patch)

The 7 train has been literally falling apart, but the MTA doesn’t think that danger is enough to put netting under the platforms to protect the cars below. (The City)

The city’s libraries need about $35 million in additional funding, but they received an $11 million cut from Mayor de Blasio. This is poor timing because the libraries are expected to play a big part in the 2020 census, which the mayor claims to be a priority. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Welcome to the Mr. Jones Supper Club, the city’s most exclusive dining experience. (Great Big Story)

Over a quarter million people move out of the city every year and move to the suburbs, where they find that their commutes still suck. (Gothamist)

Corey Johnson has put a bill forward that is a ten-year roadmap to breaking the city’s car culture. (Curbed)

Penn Station, the city’s festering exit wound,” sucks, but here are a few tips to make it a slightly less nightmarish hellscape. (Gothamist)

The state’s legislature says it’s time to end the state’s ban on “gravity” knives. The governor has vetoed similar bills twice, but with evidence that the law is selectively enforced against people of color and a recent judge called it “unconstitutional,” he may sign it into law this time. (Patch)

Here’s news you don’t want to hear. Some of the city’s water fountains contain up to 50x the federally allowed amount of lead. 4.5% of early tests came back positive for lead. The entire city is scheduled to be tested by June 14. (Gothamist)

Diners have been an important part of the city for decades, but real estate developers and rising costs of rent have been poisoning diner culture and they’re in danger of disappearing. (NY Times)

The Bowery Mural Wall is ready to turn over, but not without someone tagging the white wall first. (Bowery Boogie)

Hervey Weinstein, a real-world Cloverfield-style monster, tentatively reached a $44 million settlement to resolve the lawsuits against him. (NY Times)

The MTA’s Inspector General will be the sacrificial goat when it comes to the overtime scandal. Governor Cuomo is set to replace 12-year IG Barry Kluger with the governor’s Special Council for Public Integrity Carolyn Pokorny. Gothamist)

Who can you blame for your allergies? Men! Well, kinda. (Atlas Obscura)

Food and drink recommendations on Memorial Day from Grub Street. (Should be obvious this is from Grub Street)

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