The Briefly for June 13, 2019 – The “A New Subway Villain Has Emerged” Edition

The governor will sign the rent reform laws, the mayor looks to further restrict Uber and Lyft’s operations, the best veggie burger in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the city’s top ten public high schools. (Patch)

The city’s new mansion tax is hitting on July 1, and sellers are already trying to price their way out of it. (StreetEasy)

New York City has a new subway villain. On different incidents, a man threw a bag of concrete, a fire extinguisher, Christmas lights, and a shovel. (Gothamist)

10 buildings connected to NYC’s maritime past. (Untapped Cities)

The best restaurants of 2019, according to Eater’s Ryan Sutton. (Eater)

“There’s a daunting task ahead of us on this,” is an understatement by the chair of the committee overseeing the $4 billion reconstruction of the BQE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed the mannequin children strewn across the city in small cages? No Kids in Cages is responsible for the 25 protest installations across Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Outside of San Francisco, Brooklyn has the country’s most booming tech sector, growing 356% in the last ten years. (amNY)

Where to eat near the Boardwalk in Rockaway Beach. (Eater)

While the Governors Island “urban camping experience” isn’t exactly camping by most stretches of the imagination with miniature cabins, 1500 thread count sheets, wifi, electricity, a spa, and room service, but it does look nice (6sqft)

In the last year, the city ensured a minimum wage for Uber and Lyft drivers and prevented any new drivers from being added to the pool of e-hail vehicles which already makes up 29% of all cars below 60th in Manhattan. The mayor’s next restriction will be limiting the amount of time e-hail vehicles can cruise below 96th in Manhattan without a passenger. Currently, e-hail vehicles spend 41% of their time without passengers. That rate would have to drop to 31% under the coming rule, or companies would face fines or potentially have their licenses to operate revoked. (amNY)

Here is the horseshoe route for the World Pride Parade on June 30, which is expected to be the largest Pride Parade in history. (6sqft)

The DOT unveiled plans for a protected bike lane on Central Park West. The Community Board and City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal had called for a two-way bike lane, similar to Prospect Park West, but the DOT called that idea “psychologically unrealistic.” (Gothamist)

A guide to (responsibly) day drink. (The Infatuation)

I’m bullish on anything that brings more joy and delight to the city in a near-invisible fashion. See Me Tell Me is playing hide-and-seek with her art on Instagram. Right now the has under a thousand followers, but let’s see if we can’t change that. (Bedford + Bowery)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds” may be the creed of the postal service, but in the city, it’s the food delivery person that follows that creed to the letter and City Comptroller Scott Stringer is adding his voice to those calling for the legalization of electric bikes with an op-ed for Streetsblog. (Streetsblog)

Take a ride on the 3rd Ave El in a film from 1955, documenting Manhattan’s last elevated subway line. (Viewing NYC)

The governor supports the rent reform bills that are working their way through the legislature and has voiced that once they’re on his desk he will sign them into law, which hasn’t always been a guarantee. (amNY)

When the rent reform bills become law, it will be the signal that the influence that New York’s real estate industry holds over the state’s politics is not untouchable. (NY Times)

Yoko Ono’s ‘The Reflection Project’ is moving into unconventional spaces in lower Manhattan, encouraging you to “rally the collective consciousness towards heightened awareness, hope and action.” Just don’t do it in someone else’s way. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Gem Spa on St Mark’s and Second Ave is in danger of closing. A combination of rising rents and a former employee selling cigarettes to a minor have threatened the iconic store’s 80-year existence. It’s likely the best place you can buy egg creams and fedoras and coffee and candy in the city. (Vanishing New York)

Another detainee died in the custody of the Department of Corrections two days after the death of Layleen Polanco on Rikers Island. The cause of death and name haven’t been released. (Patch)

This new IKEA robotic furniture looks right out of The Fifth Element. (6sqft)

The governor is pushing for the state to extend the statute of limitations for rape victims and change the legal definition of harassment. (Politico)

The new status symbol for performers is a Broadway residency and the latest name to make their way is Dave Chappelle. Dave Chappelle Live on Broadway will happen from July 9-13 with tickets going on same June 18th. (Gothamist)

A guide to Pride in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The House Judiciary Committee passed the bill to reauthorize and fund the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund for about seven more decades after being publicly shamed by Jon Stewart. (Patch)

How did Jon Stewart become the voice of the ongoing victims of 9/11? (NY Times)

“It’s another entertainment show beginning with an overwrought speech of a shaken host.” The first Daily Show with Jon Stewart after the 9/11 attacks is still worth watching. (Comedy Central)

A first look at the new DUMBO library. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Drone photos and videos from high above Green-Wood Cemetery. (Gothamist)

The city’s best veggie burgers. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for April 16, 2019 – The “Birds Are Cool and Trash Pandas are Getting Vaccinated” Edition

The city’s fight again measles continues with a preschool shutdown, a pipeline threatens Rockaway Beach, New York pizza in the Virgin Islands, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

CompStat, the focus of a recent ReplyAll episode, is being blamed in a $70 million lawsuit by a Brooklyn family against the NYPD for harassment and a false arrest. (Daily News)

The MTA can tout percentages of trains that have had improving performance, but the truth of the matter is that Monday morning’s commute was a nightmare for the A, C, E, F, M, J, and G trains. (Gothamist)

Now that birds are as cool as a street corner shaved ice, here are sixteen of the best bird-watching spots in the city. (Curbed)

Webster Hall is reopening this month and the first show was announced: Jay-Z. (BrooklynVegan)

This makes no small claim, but Eater has a profile of the women who make New York’s “most perfect tortillas.” (Eater)

107 years (and a day) after the Titanic sunk and 21 years after Kate Winslet let Leonardo DiCaprio die, here are ten city sites that connect New York to the sunken ship. (6sqft)

Ten places to visit in the city for a “small town” feel. (Untapped Cities)

President Trump’s executive order expediting gas pipelines is hitting close to home, with the Williams Northeast Supply Enhancement, which is proposed to run from Pennsylvania and terminate close to Rockaway Beach. Opponents say the project will threaten the harbor and marine life in the area. (QNS)

New York may have been able to fight off Amazon, but Jeff Bezos is still eyeing property. Rumor is he’s looking to spend $60 million on a new apartment, which would be a few blocks from other apartments he owns. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The death of Nipsey Hussle inspired a march for peace over with hundreds of current and former gang members in the South Bronx. (Gothamist)

The second-tallest building in the Western Hemisphere is moving forward. The building will require special permits, but if it’s allowed it will be 1,556 feet tall and the 18th “supertall” tower to be constructed in the last dozen years. (6qsft)

What is the cost of a measles outbreak? A single outbreak can cost an individual nearly $10,000 and more than $5 million for a community. (The Indicator from Planet Money)

The city shut down a preschool program at a Brooklyn yeshiva for violating the Health Department order that requires them to have a corrective action plan for measles. (NY Times)

A lawsuit claims that the measles outbreak in the city isn’t an emergency and demanding a restraining order on the mayor’s mandatory vaccination rule that went into effect last Tuesday. There have been 285 confirmed measles cases in Williamsburg since October. (Gothamist)

If your day has been stressful, take a moment to watch Maxine the Fluffy Corgi fight to stay awake while riding the subway. (Viewing NYC)

While new explicitly New York, it is New York pizza related. The best restaurant in the U.S. Virgin Islands is a New York pizza food truck boat in Christmas Cove. (Atlas Obscura)

All seven BQE rehab plans, explained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

City Winery, which will lose its current location when Disney’s offices eat the West Village, will have a new home in early 2020 at Hudson River Park’s Pier 57. (Eater)

Brooklyn Bride Park’s spring and summer lineup was announced, including a kite festival, the MET Opera, stargazing, a more. (Bklyner)

The Met Museum’s new rooftop installation “Parapivot” touches on the interstellar, Manhattan’s grid, and is meant to invoke a connection to “the multiverse above and around us, too.” (amNY)

No one wants to pay full price, and that includes State Senator Andrew Gounardes. Gounardes is arguing that Brooklyn residents who frequent the Verrazzano bridge should receive a discount. The discount for Staten Island residents was put in place because it seemed unfair to charge full price for every single way to get in or out of the borough. There are many roads in and out of Brooklyn. (Bklyner)

Here’s a stunning time-lapse of the Manhattan skies after a snowstorm. (Scott Segler)

The NYCHA’s inspection of 135,000 apartments for lead hazards begun this week. At the current rate, the inspections are scheduled to end before 2020. The mayor has not appointed a new NYCHA chair since the deadline passed on April 1. (amNY)

Portions of the city’s trash panda population will be vaccinated for rabies. No lawsuits are expected as a result of the vaccine implementation. (Gothamist)

The American Museum of Natural History canceled the gala that would have honored Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s asshole president. Sorry Brazil, we can only deal with one asshole president at a time. (Gothamist)

Lyft plans on integrating Citi Bikes into the main Lyft app starting in May, which will allow you to pay for your bike and ride in one app. It’s also a good way to educate New Yorkers that Lyft owns Motivate, Citi Bike’s parent company. (Patch)

It was the parents and not City Hall that successfully desegregated schools in District 3 and 15 when the city seemed to be incapable of doing so while the rest of the city’s education system remains one of the most segregated in the nation. (NY Times)

After three deaths on construction sites this week the City Council is pushing for the implementation of a construction safety training law passed in 2017. (Queens Crap)

The best Omakase sushi in the city, ranked by price. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for April 4, 2019 – The “De Blasio Does His Best Cuomo Impression” Edition

New Yorkers are united in their opposition to the mayor’s presidential hopes, Manhattan’s accidental leaning tower, Chinatown’s “Bloody Angle”, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

12 new art installations to check out in Apriln. (Untapped Cities)

Queens Councilman Eric Ulrich is calling on the mayor to fire the Department of Homeless Services Commissioner Steve Banks in a change.org petition. Ulrich says Banks’ failure to address chronic homelessness is the base reason for the petition. (QNS)

The mayor announced an “expert panel” to fix the mess that is the BQE construction. The panel will be lead by the CEO of a construction trade lobbying group and include people from a Google/Alphabet subsidiary, the Regional Planning Association, NYU, multiple trade and construction groups, and others. The panel is light on urban planning experts and will be tasked with finding an outcome that is “in the best interests of everyone.” (Gothamist)

It seems Rock & Roll is an acceptable art form now, getting its first exhibition at the Met. (Gothamist)

Donald Trump’s first Manhattan real estate project pioneered the tax incentives whose lineage can be traced all the way to the recent imploded Amazon deal. (Curbed)

Yesterday we learned that we’re paying the highest taxes in the country, and now there’s an indication that the city is over-taxing hundreds of small buildings accidentally, in some cases 4x the appropriate rate. (The Real Deal)

Taking a dip in the East River anytime soon? Here’s a field guide to what you might find in the water. (Gothamist)

If you’re interested in working the 2020 Census, there will be a job fair at Queens Borough Hall on May 1. (QNS)

The list of the world’s best hospitals includes three hospitals in the city. (Patch)

A look in photos of what is left of “Italian Williamsburg.” (NY Times)

Here’s a look at the OMNY subway NFC systems in the wild. If the demo iPhones in Apple stores can always be found to have fecal matter on them, imagine how gross these screens are going to get. (Gothamist)

Something is fishy about the city’s purchase of buildings for $173 million when their first estimate valued them at $50 million. Also, the landlords are represented by a lawyer who is helping the mayor raise money to fly around the country pretending anyone wants to see him run for president. (NY Times)

As a reminder, 76% of New Yorkers don’t want the mayor to run for president. Only 42% approve of the job he’s doing in New York. (amNY)

Why does no one want the mayor to run for president? Maybe it’s a moment like this, where he blamed the federal government for all of the city’s problems. (NY Post)

Manhattan has its own leaning tower. A 58-story condo on Maiden Lane is leaning North by three inches as a result of a faulty foundation, according to a lawsuit. Construction is still continuing, despite complaints. (Gothamist)

638 of the city’s bridges are considered “structurally deficient,” which include the Brooklyn Bridge and the Throgs Neck. (Patch)

In the last four years, Uber spent $2 million lobbying in favor of congestion pricing. (NY Post)

A body of a 53-year-old man was discovered in the water near the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into Chinatown’s “Bloody Angle.” How Doyers Street’s gang violence earned it that nickname. (Streeteasy)

A look at The Shed, Hudson Yards’ cultural center which has more configurations than a transformer. (Engadget)

20 tasty Thai restaurants in the city. (Eater)

The city’s comptroller wants the Department of Transportation to take control of the NYC Ferry system from private company Hornblower after learning how astronomically high the city subsidizes each rider’s trip. (Curbed)

After a 10-year fight with the MTA, Luis Colon was awarded $22 million after needing spinal fusion surgery from a fall from a makeshift platform on the Henry Hudson Bridge. (NY Post)

Take a look at this insane plan from the 1940s to build an airport on top of buildings from 24th to 71st Streets. (Viewing NYC)

The best spring break food and drinks. (amNY)

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