The Briefly for April 11, 2019 – The “Not the Best Place to Live, Not Even Close” Edition

A Y2K-like bug brought down some of the city’s GPS systems, Pat Kiernan has a new podcast, MTA workers fight the upcoming L Project, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York’s favorite news anchor, Pat Kiernan, has a new podcast. (NY1)

The state senate unanimously passed the Religious Garb Act, which will allow the wearing of “any attire, clothing, or facial hair” protected under the Human Rights Law for religious purposes. (QNS)

US News & World Report released the 2019 best places to live and we’re… not #1. Are you insane? We’re 90 out of 125. If you want #1, go move to Austin. (NY Post)

Maybe traffic cameras should, you know, police traffic regulations. That’s what State Assembly Member Michael DenDekker is proposing by adding bicycle lane violations to what traffic cameras enforce. (Sunnyside Post)

Murderinos, this one has your name written all over it. An 80-year-old Queens man was arrested for a Virginia double murder from 1973. (Gothamist)

Turns out those protective sidewalk covers don’t do much when the whole damn building collapses on top of them. No one was hurt when it happened in Williamsburg, except a few cars and maybe a penny-farthing bicycle or unicycle. It’s Williamsburg after all. (Gothamist)

A pizzeria shakedown straight out of a Jon Stewart comedy routine, but it’s real and the “mobsters” are facing up to 20 years in prison. (Brooklyn Paper)

These marijuana entrepreneurs have HIGH hopes for legalization. Get it? HIGH HOPES! Ugh. (Gothamist)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

A guided dumpling crawl through Queens. (Eater)

After 35 years, bookbook on Bleecker Street will be closing. In order to stay open, the store would need a rent reduction and in 2019, that ain’t happening. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The five best grilled cheeses in the city. (Thrillist)

Foreclosures in the Bronx are up 28% in the first quarter of 2019. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s shortest bike lane has been found. (Brooklyn Paper)

This weekend’s “Blessing of the Rides” in Coney Island is a New York City annual tradition. Here’s what to expect from the egg cream christening to the blessing itself. (amNY)

A group of transit workers is calling the L Project’s (the new and crappy name for the non-shutdown) air quality into question with flyers saying the silica dust in the air is a danger to anyone who breathes it in. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez’ office broke up a gun trafficking ring after an undercover detective purchased three dozen guns, including automatic weapons. (amNY)

The Harlem School of the Arts will undergo a $9.5 million renovation that will begin in August and update the brutalist style exterior of the building with a glass wall, and make other welcome improvements. (NY Times)

There is no law dictating that your apartment be 80% covered with rugs, but most leases include it in a clause. What are the consequences for not complying? Well, that’s a little harder to define. (StreetEasy)

A look inside Manhattan’s first Ikea. It looks a lot like an Ikea, but you’re gonna look anyway. (Curbed)

The inevitable lawsuit over the city’s vaccine mandate has arrived. (Gothamist)

Why is there a 3,000 square foot bounce house in Dumbo? Because art, of course. (Time Out)

NYC is being afflicted by a Y2K-esque bug in some of its GPS systems. This is a once every twenty year GPS reset and city officials are being very tight-lipped about it. (NY Times)

What’s going on with the smoldering anus in Union Square? (Gothamist)

Saturday is Record Store Day, the most important holiday for the vinyl obsessed and for record store owners across the city. (amNY)

A look at City Hall Station, the unused subway station where the 6 train turns around which shows the grandeur of how the subways could have been. (NY Times)

The best neighborhoods for college grads. (Localize Labs)

Is removing stops the right way to make a bus route faster? Consider the case of the M14. (Bowery Boogie)

An interview with Carlo Scissura, the head of the new BQE expert panel. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Easter brunch spots.

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The Briefly for March 13, 2019 – The “Despite All My Rage I Am Still Just a Rat in a MetroCard Machine” Edition

The Hell’s Angels are leaving the East Village, inside Hudson Yards before the Friday opening, the Brooklyn Botanical Garden is fighting a rezoning, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Starting tonight you can see a live satellite video of the earth projected on the side of 159 Ludlow on the Lower East Side. The installation, called “blu Marble” is the work of Sebastian Errazuriz. (Bedford + Bowery)

New York has higher taxes than almost every other state, and we still cann’t fix the MTA. (Patch)

The MTA version of a double rainbow is the rat inside a MetroCard machine. (@SMarketingmusic) h/t to @theskint

The measles outbreak in the city’s ultra-Orthodox Jewish community can be traced back to a dial-in hotline for moms which spread misinformation. (NY Times)

186 arrests and 64 convictions have come from the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office initiative to test backlogged rape kits across the US. 55,000 kits have been tested since the project started in 2015. (NY Post)

The Trump administration is proposed decreasing the HUD budget by 16.4%, which could wind up being a massive hit to NYCHA’s federal funding. (Curbed)

The Trump Administration also balked on funding the Gateway rail project, calling the project a “local responsibility.” (6sqft)

A look inside the abandoned Time Square Theater. (Untapped Cities)

Some very good dogs will lead a blind runner through the NYC Half Marathon this weekend. (amNY)

State Senator Zellnor Myrie introduced a bill in the State Senate to restrict campaign contributions from anyone seeking government contracts and bar prospective vendors from contributing for six months after a contract is granted by the state. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is fighting against a 1,578 apartment development’s rezoning request. If approved, the pair of 39-story towers would cast a problematic shadow over 21 grow spaces and nurseries. The current zoning allows for 75-foot buildings. (6sqft)

A guide to this Sunday’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. (amNY)

The nutball restaurateur who flew himself to Seattle to try to convince Amazon to reconsider Long Island City isn’t done yet. Now he’s suing Councilperson Jimmy Van Brammer for defamation. (Gothamist)

Trump supporters created their own version of Yelp for MAGA-friendly businesses. While you could use the app to find these places, you can also use it to avoid them.. (The Daily Beast)

Ten-year-old Khadijah Sabir from Bensonhurst needs a new kidney. If you can help, please help. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The cleanup of the Red Hook ball fields resumed after the federal government shutdown. The EPA will remove six inches of soil and add 12 inches of clean fill and astroturf will cover all the fields. The last phase of the cleanup will be finished by spring 2023. (Bklyner)

A history of the Greenpoint piers. (Greenpointers)

Take a look inside Hudson Yards’ seven-story dining and shopping center ahead of Friday’s opening. (6sqft)

Multiple city burgers made it to this list of 35 burgers you need to eat before you die with Harlem Public’s Peanut Butter Burger topping the list. (Food Insider)

The BQE reconstruction, explained. (Curbed)

Everyone’s getting in on the history of the White Horse Tavern articles this week. Here’s another. (Gothamist)

How do NYC’s graduate schools rank among the top in the country? Hopefully as well as our burgers. (Patch)

No one is allowed to shower or use or drink the water at Brooklyn’s Methodist Hospital in Park Slope four months after a legionella bacteria outbreak in December. Anti-bacterial wipes have replaced hand washing and even showers. (Patch)

13,000 nurses could strike this month if negotiations fail between the New York State Nurses Association and a group of three major hospital systems. (Gotham Gazette)

The Hell’s Angels are vacating their East Village clubhouse, which they purchased in $1,700. The building was transferred for an unknown amount. Did you know the Hell’s Angels is a non-profit religious group in New York State? (Downtown Express)

Where to go when you don’t want to make a big deal about your birthday, but you actually do. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 6, 2019 – The “Do You Smell Maple Syrup or an Oil Spill?” Edition

Historians plan to block the Brooklyn Promenade construction, the NYCHA gets a new leader, an atomic Super Bowl meltdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Get a feel for the city’s housing crisis with an interactive map of 20,000 evictions in 2018. (Curbed)

How to watch tonight’s ten person Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

Has it already been ten years since the mysterious maple syrup smell took over the city. Was it Northrax? Nope. It was a a perfume and food additive processing plant. (Gothamist)

The MTA is having a banner week. Maybe they’re celebrating the anniversary? A noxious gas filled the L train tunnel between Manhattan and Brooklyn on Tuesday as a result of an oil leak. (Brooklyn Paper)

Know your pain before you arrive. JFK, Newark, and LaGuardia’s websites now show real-time information on the wait times for taxis and TSA checkpoints. (Curbed)

The mayor expanded dual-language pre-K programs, which will now include French, Haitian Creole, Japanese, and Hebrew in addition to Spanish, Chinese, Russian, and Bengali, which are already available. The expansion has a dual purpose of also giving the mayor more control over the city’s schools. (Chalkbeat)

Why city parking is so annoying and how to master it. (Thrillist)

Historic preservation groups may sue the city if the city’s BQE plans move forward that removes the Brooklyn Promenade. (Curbed)

Apple may open a new office at Hudson Yards. Another tech company making a home in NYC without negotiating subsidies. (6sqft)

Why are condos more expensive than co-ops? (StreetEasy)

If you hate large sandwiches, this tiny egg sandwich is for you. (Eater)

Five mothers filed complaint against the NYPD after they say they were forced to pump breast milk in front of their colleagues, a violation of a 2007 law. (NY Post)

The 9 most romantic spots in NYC and also the Staten Island Ferry. (6sqft)

Governor Cuomo is claiming the state senate is playing politics with the Amazon HQ2 deal by appointing Senator Michael Gianaris to the Public Authorities Control Board. The governor has to approve Gianaris’ appointment to the board. Will he? “Well we’re not there yet.” (Gothamist)

State Senator Michael Gianaris gets the NY Times profile treatment. (NY Times)

Trump Tower: Luxury living for the morally bankrupt. (EV Grieve)

The FDNY saved 46 puppies and two cats from a burning pet store on the Upper East Side. No puppies were injured. (NY Post)

It’s a bad week for Broadway shows. “Anastasia” will lose on March 31. (NY Times)

NYC Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia will serve as interim head of NYCHA, Garcia is the head of the Department of Sanitation and also the city’s lead czar. (Pix 11)

MoMA will close for four months to re-envision how the collection is presented, from June 15 to October 21. (Patch)

The East Village’s Atomic Wings had a super atomic meltdown during the Super Bowl. (Eater)

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