The Briefly for September 6, 2018 – A New Entrance to Penn Station, Ice Cream Noise Complaints, and More

Is Governor Cuomo’s endorsement toxic? Ice cream trucks generate over 1,000 noise complaints/year, Staten Island’s ferris wheel’s future is in question, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

A ballot initiative in November will give voters the option to lower the maximum donation in city elections from $5,100 to $2,000.

There were 1,279 ice cream truck noise complaints in the last year.

Does New York City needs the BQX? Curbed asks if the $2.7 billion streetcar project is worth the price after the recent revision to the plan.

The governor is rumored to announce a new entrance to Penn Station on Thursday morning. 650,000 use Penn Station on a daily basis and that number is expected to double in the next 15 years.

A flight from Dubai to JFK touched down with multiple people sick with flu-like symptoms. One of the people trapped on the “flu plane” was Vanilla Ice.

The World Trade Center/Cortland St subway stop opens this Saturday.

The culture is double parking!” Inwood’s bike lane drama is getting complicated.

“Equal Pay for Equal Work” has an origin story in NYC classrooms.

Landlords in the city owe more than $1.5 billion in fines. Kushner Companies owes the city over $500,000 alone.

The New York Wheel, Staten Island’s giant ferris wheel, may never be built. The contractor walked off the job in May and the whole project has become a series of lawsuits. The original plan had the wheel opening in October 2016 and costing $250 million. The current estimate is $600 million and it’s unknown if it will ever be built.

The Supreme Court decision that allowed government workers to not pay union dues is costing the city’s unions over $100,000 a week.

Will Governor Cuomo’s endorsement hurt Leticia James’s bid for Attorney General?

This year’s cronut is Duck’s Eatery’s smoked watermelon “ham.” Each costs $75 and they’re sold out through November.

The largest state park in New York City will open next summer in Brooklyn and will be named after Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress.

LIRR delays are the worst they’ve been in over 18 years. The MTA is fine.

Passenger service ended sixty five years ago on Staten Island’s North Shore Branch and there are still ghosts of the rail line marking the island.


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The Briefly for August 31, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, J’Ouvert, Electric Scooters, and More

The weekend’s subway changes (the L train is running), the Brooklyn-Queens streetcar project is a long way from starting, “Jewtropolis” in maps, moving Central Park’s horse carriages away from cars, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Everything you need to know about subway changes this weekend and Monday.

The official information on J’Ouvert on Monday. Get a preview of someone of the elaborate preparations.

Gothamist looked at all the New York State Senate campaign websites so you don’t have to.

Meet the rebellious women of NYC in the 1800s.

For a few hours in Uber, the Weather Channel, Snapchat, and others, New York City’s name was changed to Jewtropolis. Whoops.

Dockless electric scooters from Bird have made their debut in the city with the first program taking place in Bed Stuy.

The Mayor’s lack of response to the hit and run that a killed four-year-old in Bushwick compared to everything that he has publicly done in response to the crash the killed a one and four-year-old in Park Slope tells the tale of two Brooklyns.

Some questions for the Governor after his debate against Cynthia Nixon.

The Department of Transportation proposed moving horse carriage pickups in Central Park to five spots within the park to decrease the amount of time they spend alongside cars.

The history of Brooklyn’s Caribbean carnival.

An evening in Washington Heights is documented with a photo essay by The Village Voice.

The plan for the BQX streetcar has been revised. The new plan would connect Astoria on one end to Red Hook and Gowanus on the other end has gotten smaller in scope (stops in Sunset Park were completely removed), will be more expensive ($1.3 billion more) and take longer (won’t be completed until 2029) than the original proposal in 2016.

Today’s NYC Ferry won’t make the trip, but one September day in 1910 and again in August 1911, Rose Pitonof swam the 17 miles from E 23rd St down to Steeplechase Pier in Coney Island.


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The Briefly for August 28, 2018 – The City’s Speed Cameras Return In Time for School

The city worked with Governor Cuomo to sidestep the State Senate to reactivate the school speed cameras in time for the start of school, the BQX trolley’s future is in doubt, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Speed cameras are coming back to the city, but without the State Senate. It’s a Rube Goldberg contraption, so listen to this: Governor Cuomo signed an executive order declaring a public safety emergency and will sign a second executive order that will allow the city to access the traffic data collected from the cameras. The city council is putting together a piece of complex legislation to reinstate the use of the data from the cameras to allow the NYPD to issue tickets to people found speeding in school zones. 133,000 drivers were found to be speeding in the first two weeks after the cameras went dark on July 25.

Eater says NYC pretzels are garbage compared to Philly’s figure 8 pretzels, and this will be the last link to Eater for the rest of the week. They are in an official time out.

Welcome2TheBronx™ has five West African restaurant suggestions in the Bronx.

Without federal funding, Mayor de Blasio’s BQX trolley pet project is DOA. The federal government has only issued $25 million of the $1.4 trillion in funds allocated for new transportation projects in 2018.

The future of Coney Island’s Abe Stark ice rink is in doubt. The city has already signed off on demolishing the building and considering allowing a private developer to rebuild it, but hasn’t announced a decision yet.

Get mad at Brokelyn, because they probably forgot your favorite record store in their 10 best record stores in Brooklyn.

Airbnb is suing the city saying the new disclosure law aimed at short-term rentals is a violation of Airbnb user privacy, calling it systemic, ongoing, bulk surveillance.

Liberty Island was evacuated after a hundred pound propane tank caught fire. The island was evacuated and one person was injured.

Hank’s Saloon will close on Atlantic Ave, but they will be opening a new location inside a new Downtown Brooklyn food hall. If that doesn’t sound like the Hank’s you know and love, you’d be right. “We can never recreate Hank’s as it is now, nor should we” reads the Facebook post. The new venue will also have live music.

10 minutes of 1970s and 1980s NYC commercials.

Sad to report that the cat who functioned as the mascot of Coney Island’s 60th precinct was hit by a car and killed. RIP Marty.

Today starts the city’s regulation on smoking in apartment buildings. As of today, Local Law 147 mandates a smoking or no smoking policy has to be clearly posted in the building.

The 110th Street and Cathedral Parkway B/C station is set to reopen over Labor Day weekend. The 86th and 72nd Street stations are still closed and being serviced by the MTA’s ghost bus.


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