The Briefly for May 31, 2019 – The “Stuyshwick? This is a Joke, Right?” Edition

The weekend subways, the NYPD has been lying to the public about rape numbers, a look at the art in the echoes of the Stonewall Inn riots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions have been pretty light for the last few weeks. That ends this weekend with 13 different subway lines carrying some variety of change in service to kick off June. (Subway Weekender)

The NYPD has been lying to the public for years about the number of rapes committed in NYC. While telling the public there were 6,626 rapes in a four and a half year span, they told federal officials there were 10,649 rapes. What the hell is going on with the 38% discrepancy? The NYPD only reports vaginal penetration as rape, not anal or oral. This would preclude the inclusion of any rape committed against men from this number. With this uncertainty, the one thing that is clear is that the NYPD is setting itself to fail when it comes to cases of rape in the city. (Gothamist)

Oh god. Someone is sincerely trying to make Stuyshwick a thing (where Bushwick and Bed-Stuy meet on Broadway under the J train). Anyway, here’s a “guide” to the “neighborhood.” (Grub Street)

Whoever thought of this moronic name should look back to 2013, when BEDWICK topped Time Out’s list of the dumbest fake neighborhood names. (Time Out)

After nearly a decade in the making, a pedestrian bridge replacing the Rector Street bridge finally open this fall. (Curbed)

Seven places to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman today. (Untapped Cities)

The City Council approved two bills aimed at making streets safer. One will hold the DOT accountable to add safety design elements to any street being redesigned and the second would require any contractors to create temporary bike lanes when disrupting any pre-existing lanes. (Curbed)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 9 appears to be on the verge of falling apart, as the search to fill the empty since 2015 role of district manager was about to be debated, three board members staged a walkout. The walkout resulted in less than a quorum, ending the meeting immediately. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Everyone wants a say in the Gowanus rezoning, the latest voice to want a seat at the table is the EPA. (Curbed)

The beginning of the end of the MetroCard officially begins today. (Gothamist)

If you’re confronted with an OMNY screen, here’s how to use your phone to pay for your subway ride. Until it is available at every station you can only pay per ride. (Patch)

You’ve probably heard that the city’s water is the cleanest of anywhere in the state. It’s not a rumor. It’s the truth. (Patch)

A look inside the $5.5 million makeover of Central Park’s SummerStage. (amNY)

Brace yourself, this one’s got a sad ending. The eight-month-old puppy who escaped his harness and jumped down onto the subway tracks at Herald Square was found dead near where he first escaped. Marley’s human companions are blaming the MTA. (Gothamist)

Seventeen years after the cleanup of Ground Zero was completed, a modest ceremony was held at the new Memorial Glade dedicated to the people whose related illnesses and deaths have followed in the subsequent years. (NY Times)

Following yesterday’s assessment of how NYU and Columbia’s neighborhoods are fresh hell when it comes to renting, here are the most affordable neighborhoods for fresh college graduates. (Curbed)

It’s the city’s fanciest McDonald’s, three stories tall, walls of glass, and open 24 hours a day. (Eater)

“Tastes of Brooklyn” is coming to Crown Heights’ Franklin Ave this Sunday, a street that inspired a joke of a podcast. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The city’s Lyft and Uber cars cause more pollution than cabs, thanks to the city’s hybrid fleet. The city’s 13,500 taxi emissions dropped 82% in 15 years. (Gizmodo)

Gravity knives are no longer illegal in New York. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Measles cases are at a 25 year high, with more than half of the nation’s cases being in the city. (NY Times)

The World Pride Mural Project Initiative has brought a new Buff Monster mural at the corner of Chrystie St & Broome St to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. (Brooklyn Street Art)

As we roll into June, the city’s streets, art galleries, and museums are focusing on the art centered on the riot/rebellion/resistance/uprising at the Stonewall Inn 50 years ago. The Times’ co-chief art critic looks at the historical significance that moment at the Stonewall Inn has had and how it has reverberated through art for half a century. (NY Times)

The BQX is such a pipe dream that advocates are pinning their hopes on a Democrat taking over the presidency in 2021 so the project has a remote chance of receiving the $1.3 billion necessary to cover just under half of the cost of the project. (Gothamist)

17 LGBTQ landmarks of Greenwich Village (6sqft)

Stolen: One orange bearded dragon. (Gothamist)

Behind the scene photos from Hart Island: The city’s mass burial ground. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to Jacob Riis Park Beach for the summer of 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go on a Saturday when you want to do something but don’t have plans. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 22, 2019 – The “Our City’s Parks Are No Longer Rocking” Edition

The 7 train is literally falling apart, the mayor announces a plan to fight placard abuse, the BQX takes another hit, the YMCA, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Nearly every subway line has closures this weekend. (6sqft)

The 7 train is falling apart, literally. A piece of the train tracks fell from its elevated track and impaled an SUV through its windshield. The driver wasn’t injured, but holy shit, is anywhere near the subway safe anymore? (Curbed)

Why we rent and not buy our homes. (StreetEasy)

The mayor announced a goal of moving the parking placard system to license plates from the laminated placards on dashboards. Unless the NYPD enforces the rules, this whole thing is pointless. (Politico)

The NYPD used to hand out hundreds of summonses for sex in the city’s public parks. Last year? Zero. Are New Yorkers no longer horny on main? (NY Times)

The mayor promised serious consequences if yeshivas continue to bar Department of Education inspectors from their buildings. The deadline passed and the city is still negotiating with the schools. (Gothamist)

A map of the mega projects changing the city. (Curbed)

A look inside the new Webster Hall, but no photos of the new bathrooms. (NY Times)

Webster Hall will reopen on May 1 with Patti Smith. (Time Out)

Two more suspects were arrested in connection to the MS-13 90th Street-Elmhurst Avenue subway shooting. (NY Post)

The best parodies are barely noticeable, which means you could miss these amazing MTA parody ads if you don’t have a sharp eye. (Bklyner)

Brooklyn President Eric Adams is urging New Yorkers to join their Neighborhood Advisory Boards in order to distribute Community Service Block Grants, a program which dates back to Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The capital of President Trump’s immigration crackdown is New York City with an 88.2% increase in arrests. (Patch)

A list of the 47 hate groups active and operating in the city, double the number from ten years ago. (Patch)

What the hell is the NYPD doing blasting a hip-hop diss track outside the Marcus Garvey Village? A spokesperson said the officers “used it as a way to start a conversation with young men on the street.” Right. (Gothamist)

An 8-month-old in a stroller rolled onto the tracks of the 72nd Street 1 train. Her father jumped onto the tracks and brought her back to safety. The baby went to the hospital with a bump on her head. (amNY)

What’s special about the McBurney Y in Chelsea? Have you ever spelled out “Y.M.C.A.” at a wedding? (Gothamist)

Despite no one wanting him to run, Mayor de Blasio continues to flirt with a presidential run with a trip to Iowa this weekend. (NY Post)

The AARP supports congestion pricing, undercutting critics who say seniors will be hurt by the tolls. (Streetsblog)

Joe Crowley, defeated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is also leaving his position as head of the Queens Democratic Party. June Bunch will serve as the interim chair until a new leader is selected. (NY Post)

Nomkiki Konst, the TV-pundit-turned-candidate for Public Advocate, gets the profile treatment from Politico. (Politico)

If you’ve got three and a half hours to kill, here are 15 minutes interviews with 14 of the city’s Public Advocate candidates. (Gotham Gazette)

Ten candidates for Public Advocate on congestion pricing, safety, transportation policy, bike lanes, and the job in general. (Streetsblog)

An Amazon-less city might be the death-blow to the BQX streetcar. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Just in time for the weekend, 12 hot new brunch places. (Eater)

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The Briefly for February 7, 2019 – The “Wait, What is a Pizza Sauna?” Edition

The Public Advocate debate, the porta-potty king, a rooftop glamping sauna, the NYPD targets Waze, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest.

Watch the full Public Advocate debate or read the live blog. (NY1)

Amazon HQ2 was the common punching bag during the debate. (NY Post)

At 115 years, Maspeth’s Grant Street Bridge is ready for a makeover. (QNS)

The MTA’s 24% accessibility at subway stations should be embarrassing enough before the truth comes out about how those numbers are inflated. The subways are planned to be fully accessible by 2034 at a cost of $40 to $60 billion. (Curbed)

The BQX is taking a baby step forward. The city’s Economic Development Corporation is expected to approve a contract that will allow an environmental review. It’s only the first step of a $2.73 billion plan, which is what you might call “one full Amazon.” (Curbed)

This profile of the porta-potty king of New York City is full of crappy puns. (NY Mag)

The best bagels in Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

“Yes, I broke your window because Barack Obama was talking to me and I didn’t like what he was saying.” A perfectly understandable excuse for breaking the window of a Harlem adult shop. (Gothamist)

Lincoln Center has a new president. Henry Timms, who helped create #GivingTuesday, will leave the 92nd Street Y to take the position. (NY Times)

Releasing a banner buoyed by balloons into Grand Central Terminal is a pretty good way to make sure your protest can’t be easily removed. (Gothamist)

Waze is about to get less useful thanks to an . (NY Post)

Google to the NYPD: No thanks. (amNY)

The city is getting a pizza sauna. Yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

The BronxCare Health System will repay sexual assault patients for illegally billing them for rape exams after settling a lawsuit by the NYAG’s office. (amNY)

The state legislature is looking to raise the prison minimum wage to $3/hour. Inmates work six hours a day, five days a week between $0.10 to $1.14/hour. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Pizza sauna not your thing? You could spend time in a sauna while glamping on the roof of a Williamsburg hotel. (Time Out)

Ever wonder how the city’s greenmarkets continue to have fresh produce in the winter? Here’s your answer. (amNY)

Is anyone surprised that the state’s police unions oppose legalizing marijuana? (NY Post)

The Astoria Boulevard N/W station will close for nine months starting in March as elevators are installed. (TimesLedger)

A look at The Pirates, an enclave of fans of of F.C. St. Pauli, a German anti-fascist soccer team. (NY Times)

8 highlights from the new Museum of the Dog. (Untapped Cities)

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