The Briefly for January 10, 2020 – The “Governor Cuomo’s Art is a Nightmare” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The hottest lunch spots, MoMA and BAM get rival record store installations, the new hot bird, the BQX will not die, free Whoppers for the Bronx, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 48˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 42˚ High: 66˚

The MTA sent a cease and desist to an artist creating original subway maps on Etsy. His map is still available directly at his website. (Aaron Gordon for Vice)

The trains removed from the MTA’s subway fleet were removed over concerns that the doors would open while the trains were in motion. According to Bombadier, the manufacturer, “the doors had not been properly calibrated by a supplier.” This is all very reassuring. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The governor designed a poster and it’s a freakin’ nightmare. Cuomo himself supposedly had input on this monstrosity, and thank god he went into politics instead of art. Honestly it’s too unbelievable. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

A look at five city-focused proposals from Governor Cuomo’s State of the State address. (Bernadette de Vito for Kings County Politics)

>BAM’s Rudin Family Gallery is being , an installation that explores the significance of record shops and recording studios. The installation will include a working recording studio and record shop. Never Records opens at BAM on January 15. (Bill Pearing for Brooklyn Vegan)

Not to be outdone, MoMA is opening The Record Shop, in partnership with Earwax Records through March 1. There will be fine art prints, books, record players, and records that are a part of MoMA’s permanent collection for sale. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

A look at William Pope.L’s “member: Pope.L, 1978-2001” exhibit at MoMA. Pope.l is likely best known for his “crawls,” like “The Great White Way: 22 Miles, 9 Years, 1 Street” where he wore a Superman costume and crawled up Broadway. (Martha Schwendener for NY Times)

Adelina’s in Greenpoint is making some major changes for the new year. Last year the restaurant converted to all vegetarian and vegan and this year they’re jettisoning their pizza fritter for pinsa Romana. (Greenpointers)

The TWA Hotel is trying their hardest to continue to make headlines. A swimming pool on the roof, an ice skating rink, a bar in an airplane, and now a “retro Alpine hideaway.” No doubt you’ll find your jet setting friend posting to Instagram from the new roof installation. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Gowanus is full of unexpected activities. Shuffleboard, ax throwing, street curling, rock climbing, and don’t forget 3D archery. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Fran Drescher is developing “The Nanny” for Broadway. No word on when Ms. Fine will make her Broadway debut. (NY1)

“We are evaluating all legal options against Bombardier, including the best way to recover costs incurred as a result of this matter.” -Andy Byford (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The No Pants Subway Ride is this Sunday. (Kate Hooker for Brooklyn Based)

Move over Mandarin Duck, the hottest bird in the city is now the Painted Bunting in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Birds! (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to have a vegetarian birthday dinner. (The Infatuation)

For those of us who don’t understand the appeal of Wegmans, a personal essay about warmth, enjoyment and Wegmans. (Nancy Davidoff Kelton for West View News)

Who would have guessed that CBS NY would win “worst headline of the week” over anything at the NY Post? This week CBS went with a long-debunked theory about how HIV is transmitted to stoke fear about the new bail reforms. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The BQX just will not die. The $2 billion project that would link Red Hook to Astoria has a new website which gives some information about public hearings and the timing of the project. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

After the MTA proposed removing bus service from a portion of Roosevelt Ave in Queens, City Council Member Costa Constantinides has proposed a reform to the MTA’s board, allowing for each borough to have its own representative appointed by the borough president instead of the four members appointed by the mayor. (Kristen Torres for Jackson Heights Post)

Mayor De Blasio put a panel together to help decide what should be done with the necessary BQE construction along the Brooklyn Promenade. Their recommendation? Create another panel. No solution, some recommendations to reduce traffic, but ultimately a draft release of the report says that this is a project that needs federal, state, and local input. Perhaps this will be discussed until the BQE literally crumbles. (Dana Rubensten for Politico)

FREE Williamsburg is ending its run this year, the 22nd year of its existence. They’ll be celebrating the end at Saint Vitus at the end of the month. (Robert Lanham for FREE Williamsburg)

Burger King is trying to make living near the Joker stairs in the Bronx a bit less painful with a promotion for a free Whopper if you live in the Bronx through Uber Eats. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Neir’s Tavern in Woodhaven has been open since 1829 (or 1855 depend on who you listen to). This Sunday is its last day, as the bar is closing for good after a battle with its landlord over rent, so head out to Woodhaven this weekend to raise a glass to one of the city’s oldest watering holes. (Kevin Walsh at Forgotten New York)

Is a surprise for no one, WeWork lease-signing is at a five year low. (Jack Sidders for Bloomberg)

Nothing is as Murray Hill as this White Claw Hard Seltzer display where a magazine rack used to be. (@heybonanos)

A former Brooklyn cop was sentenced Wednesday to one day in jail and four years of probation nearly a year after he claimed a suspect almost ran him and his partner over with a car—until a video surfaced months later that showed he lied. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Two Wheels, Soho Diner, the Deco, the Awkward Scone, Yafa Cafe join Eater’s list of the 14 hottest lunch spots in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for May 31, 2019 – The “Stuyshwick? This is a Joke, Right?” Edition

The weekend subways, the NYPD has been lying to the public about rape numbers, a look at the art in the echoes of the Stonewall Inn riots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions have been pretty light for the last few weeks. That ends this weekend with 13 different subway lines carrying some variety of change in service to kick off June. (Subway Weekender)

The NYPD has been lying to the public for years about the number of rapes committed in NYC. While telling the public there were 6,626 rapes in a four and a half year span, they told federal officials there were 10,649 rapes. What the hell is going on with the 38% discrepancy? The NYPD only reports vaginal penetration as rape, not anal or oral. This would preclude the inclusion of any rape committed against men from this number. With this uncertainty, the one thing that is clear is that the NYPD is setting itself to fail when it comes to cases of rape in the city. (Gothamist)

Oh god. Someone is sincerely trying to make Stuyshwick a thing (where Bushwick and Bed-Stuy meet on Broadway under the J train). Anyway, here’s a “guide” to the “neighborhood.” (Grub Street)

Whoever thought of this moronic name should look back to 2013, when BEDWICK topped Time Out’s list of the dumbest fake neighborhood names. (Time Out)

After nearly a decade in the making, a pedestrian bridge replacing the Rector Street bridge finally open this fall. (Curbed)

Seven places to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman today. (Untapped Cities)

The City Council approved two bills aimed at making streets safer. One will hold the DOT accountable to add safety design elements to any street being redesigned and the second would require any contractors to create temporary bike lanes when disrupting any pre-existing lanes. (Curbed)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 9 appears to be on the verge of falling apart, as the search to fill the empty since 2015 role of district manager was about to be debated, three board members staged a walkout. The walkout resulted in less than a quorum, ending the meeting immediately. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Everyone wants a say in the Gowanus rezoning, the latest voice to want a seat at the table is the EPA. (Curbed)

The beginning of the end of the MetroCard officially begins today. (Gothamist)

If you’re confronted with an OMNY screen, here’s how to use your phone to pay for your subway ride. Until it is available at every station you can only pay per ride. (Patch)

You’ve probably heard that the city’s water is the cleanest of anywhere in the state. It’s not a rumor. It’s the truth. (Patch)

A look inside the $5.5 million makeover of Central Park’s SummerStage. (amNY)

Brace yourself, this one’s got a sad ending. The eight-month-old puppy who escaped his harness and jumped down onto the subway tracks at Herald Square was found dead near where he first escaped. Marley’s human companions are blaming the MTA. (Gothamist)

Seventeen years after the cleanup of Ground Zero was completed, a modest ceremony was held at the new Memorial Glade dedicated to the people whose related illnesses and deaths have followed in the subsequent years. (NY Times)

Following yesterday’s assessment of how NYU and Columbia’s neighborhoods are fresh hell when it comes to renting, here are the most affordable neighborhoods for fresh college graduates. (Curbed)

It’s the city’s fanciest McDonald’s, three stories tall, walls of glass, and open 24 hours a day. (Eater)

“Tastes of Brooklyn” is coming to Crown Heights’ Franklin Ave this Sunday, a street that inspired a joke of a podcast. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The city’s Lyft and Uber cars cause more pollution than cabs, thanks to the city’s hybrid fleet. The city’s 13,500 taxi emissions dropped 82% in 15 years. (Gizmodo)

Gravity knives are no longer illegal in New York. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Measles cases are at a 25 year high, with more than half of the nation’s cases being in the city. (NY Times)

The World Pride Mural Project Initiative has brought a new Buff Monster mural at the corner of Chrystie St & Broome St to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. (Brooklyn Street Art)

As we roll into June, the city’s streets, art galleries, and museums are focusing on the art centered on the riot/rebellion/resistance/uprising at the Stonewall Inn 50 years ago. The Times’ co-chief art critic looks at the historical significance that moment at the Stonewall Inn has had and how it has reverberated through art for half a century. (NY Times)

The BQX is such a pipe dream that advocates are pinning their hopes on a Democrat taking over the presidency in 2021 so the project has a remote chance of receiving the $1.3 billion necessary to cover just under half of the cost of the project. (Gothamist)

17 LGBTQ landmarks of Greenwich Village (6sqft)

Stolen: One orange bearded dragon. (Gothamist)

Behind the scene photos from Hart Island: The city’s mass burial ground. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to Jacob Riis Park Beach for the summer of 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go on a Saturday when you want to do something but don’t have plans. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 22, 2019 – The “Our City’s Parks Are No Longer Rocking” Edition

The 7 train is literally falling apart, the mayor announces a plan to fight placard abuse, the BQX takes another hit, the YMCA, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Nearly every subway line has closures this weekend. (6sqft)

The 7 train is falling apart, literally. A piece of the train tracks fell from its elevated track and impaled an SUV through its windshield. The driver wasn’t injured, but holy shit, is anywhere near the subway safe anymore? (Curbed)

Why we rent and not buy our homes. (StreetEasy)

The mayor announced a goal of moving the parking placard system to license plates from the laminated placards on dashboards. Unless the NYPD enforces the rules, this whole thing is pointless. (Politico)

The NYPD used to hand out hundreds of summonses for sex in the city’s public parks. Last year? Zero. Are New Yorkers no longer horny on main? (NY Times)

The mayor promised serious consequences if yeshivas continue to bar Department of Education inspectors from their buildings. The deadline passed and the city is still negotiating with the schools. (Gothamist)

A map of the mega projects changing the city. (Curbed)

A look inside the new Webster Hall, but no photos of the new bathrooms. (NY Times)

Webster Hall will reopen on May 1 with Patti Smith. (Time Out)

Two more suspects were arrested in connection to the MS-13 90th Street-Elmhurst Avenue subway shooting. (NY Post)

The best parodies are barely noticeable, which means you could miss these amazing MTA parody ads if you don’t have a sharp eye. (Bklyner)

Brooklyn President Eric Adams is urging New Yorkers to join their Neighborhood Advisory Boards in order to distribute Community Service Block Grants, a program which dates back to Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The capital of President Trump’s immigration crackdown is New York City with an 88.2% increase in arrests. (Patch)

A list of the 47 hate groups active and operating in the city, double the number from ten years ago. (Patch)

What the hell is the NYPD doing blasting a hip-hop diss track outside the Marcus Garvey Village? A spokesperson said the officers “used it as a way to start a conversation with young men on the street.” Right. (Gothamist)

An 8-month-old in a stroller rolled onto the tracks of the 72nd Street 1 train. Her father jumped onto the tracks and brought her back to safety. The baby went to the hospital with a bump on her head. (amNY)

What’s special about the McBurney Y in Chelsea? Have you ever spelled out “Y.M.C.A.” at a wedding? (Gothamist)

Despite no one wanting him to run, Mayor de Blasio continues to flirt with a presidential run with a trip to Iowa this weekend. (NY Post)

The AARP supports congestion pricing, undercutting critics who say seniors will be hurt by the tolls. (Streetsblog)

Joe Crowley, defeated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is also leaving his position as head of the Queens Democratic Party. June Bunch will serve as the interim chair until a new leader is selected. (NY Post)

Nomkiki Konst, the TV-pundit-turned-candidate for Public Advocate, gets the profile treatment from Politico. (Politico)

If you’ve got three and a half hours to kill, here are 15 minutes interviews with 14 of the city’s Public Advocate candidates. (Gotham Gazette)

Ten candidates for Public Advocate on congestion pricing, safety, transportation policy, bike lanes, and the job in general. (Streetsblog)

An Amazon-less city might be the death-blow to the BQX streetcar. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Just in time for the weekend, 12 hot new brunch places. (Eater)

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