The Briefly for April 12, 2019 – The “Racist If You Do, Racist If You Don’t” Edition

A hall of fame bad statement about a hit and run, Wegmans is opening this year, a gold steak, the bookmobile returns, the future of street meat, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s something you didn’t want to hear: Getting around on the subways this weekend will be more challenging than usual. (Subway Changes)

Why are there religious exemptions for vaccines? (NY Times)

A dragonstone throne will be inside the West Village Shake Shack in anticipation of Sunday’s Game of Thrones premiere. So unless you’re looking to sit on the throne, you may want to avoid that spot today. (amNY)

The city’s use of SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools was called racist. The city’s attempts to eliminate the SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools is called racist. (Politico)

A 4/20 guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The NYPL bookmobile is making a comeback this summer, with a first test in the Bronx, while the Grand Concourse Library undergoes a renovation. (amNY)

Every city borough (except Staten Island) has a higher audit rate than the rest of the state. What gives? (Patch)

17 of the 21 buildings the city is buying for $173 million are “immediately hazardous,” which includes mice and roach infestations, lead paint issues, water leaks, and broken locks. There are over 400 open violations in the buildings and the landlords are under federal investigation for tax fraud and the lawyer representing them in the sale is a de Blasio fundraiser. Weird. (The Real Deal)

Wegmans will open this fall in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. If you lived or went to college upstate, your palms are probably sweating right now. (Eater)

Ivan Nieves was found guilty of vandalizing the African Burial Ground National Monument, which happened on November 1. (NY Post)

Does the Playboy Club have a place in modern New York City? (NY Times)

The most affordable restaurants in New York, according to 14 chefs. (Grub Street)

There have been some phenomenal F-bombs on local TV over the years, from Sue Simmons’ random outburst to Ernie Asnastos’ chicken “loving” incident. Kudos to Chris Cimino, an NBC weatherman who dropped an F-bomb on live TV at 8:15am. (NY Post)

Broadway is getting a Tina Turner musical this fall. (Time Out)

The city will no longer buy single-use plastic cups, forks, knives, spoons or plates for its agencies and the mayor has indicated he supports a ban on single-use plastic in restaurants too (read: straws), with exemptions for people with disabilities. (amNY)

As New York heads towards decriminalizing marijuana use, how it’s treated by the Administration for Children’s Services needs to change. (Gothamist)

If you’re aware of the L Project, MTA Chairperson Pay Foye says that is proof enough of the MTA’s transparency about the project. Right. (Gothamist)

P.S. 9 Teunis G. Bergen will be renamed the Sarah Smith Garnet School to remove the history associated with the Bergen family as slave-holders. Garnet was the first African-American woman to become a principal in the city. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How did the city let the Y2K GPS crash happen? Don’t ask the mayor, because he already has his excuse. “I was not involved in the planning. It was not something that came up to my level.” (NY Post)

Meet the members of Community Board 6, who will decide the fate of the Gowanus neighborhood with a rezoning vote. (Pardon Me For Asking)

How to ID the fake monks that hang around tourist hot spots. (Viewing NYC)

A permit to sell street meat costs only $300 form the city but goes for $25,000 on the black market, which is why the Councilmember Margaret Chin wants to phase in an additional 4,000 permits over 10 years. Opponents are calling for more regulation before more permits are given out. (Patch)

A literal golden steak? Yup. It’s available on Staten Island. (SI Live)

“I left because, come on, I hit a little girl, I’m going to jail.“ Just when you think we’ve hit a hall of fame bad statement about someone’s alleged part in a hit and run, Julia Litmonovich also said: “What is the big deal, it was an accident.” (NY Post)

“Why can’t white people open Chinese food restaurants?” asks your uncle, who normally reserves this kind of stuff for his Facebook page. This is why. (NY Times)

Where to go when you’re not sure its a date. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 26, 2019 – The “Hey Chicago, Do You Have Any Ideas?” Edition

Bed bugs on Broadway, the MTA asks Chicago for help, subway ridership continues to decline, the history of the best $1 pizza, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Governors Island is getting a new arts center in an old munitions warehouse. If you’ve been to the island before, it’s the building near the Manhattan ferry landing with public bathrooms. (Curbed)

An investigation has found credible allegations of sexual misconduct at Saint Ann’s School, the Brooklyn private school known for an experimental approach to education, including male teachers having sex with students. (NY Times)

The MTA, out of ideas on how to stop the 7 train from literally falling apart, is asking Chicago if they have any ideas. (NY Post)

The origin story of the city’s best $1 pizza chain. Isn’t the best $1 pizza akin to the sexiest magician? (Viewing NYC)

New York has fond feelings for a mayor’s 2020 presidential run, and it ain’t de Blasio. (NY Times)

The MTA claims subway performance is increasing, while ridership continues to decline. (NY Post)

A Lyft driver was found unconscious in the back of his vehicle early on Saturday morning. He was pronounced dead of an apparent suicide. This marks the ninth taxi suicide in about 16 months. (Patch)

A preview of Astoria’s Socrates Sculpture Park spring 2019 lineup. (We Heart Astoria)

The city nurses’ strike has been postponed while negotiations are ongoing. (amNY)

Is installing facial recognition software at the entrance of a rent-stabilized apartment building going too far? (Gothamist)

The city’s proposed pied-à-terre tax could cut the most expensive apartments’ price in the city in half. Don’t worry, they’ll still be unattainable. (6sqft)

It’s like a Lyft, but helicopters between Manhattan and JFK for $195 a seat. (NY Post)

Marijuana legalization has failed in New Jersey. (NY Times)

Thanks to a $600,000 from real estate developer iStar, Coney Island’s free summer concerts will continue through 2025. (BrooklynVegan)

Longtime Bronx congressperson Jose Serrano announced he will not seeking reelection in 2020 because he has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. (Politico)

Maybe you heard there was an avocado recall. The brutal berries are in Arizona, California, Florida, New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. Not New York. (Grub Street)

Jumaane Williams’s old 45th Council District is headed for a special election on May 14 after Jumaane Williams won the special election for the Public Advocate. There are nine hopefuls who plan to run for the seat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you ready for a LEGO-but-not-actual-LEGO-themed bar? (Time Out)

The city’s proposed “express” bus route once the L train rehab begins is anything but express. (Curbed)

A breakdown of how the $78 million sewage tanks for the Gowanus Canal actually cost over over $1.2 billion. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

State Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie said the state is “ready to go forward” on congestion pricing. (amNY)

More controversial than congestion pricing is the city’s plans to replace Rikers Island with four smaller jails in every borough except Staten Island. The first step of the application process is complete. (Patch)

Did you know the fountain of youth is in the Bronx? (Atlas Obscura)

From the “don’t go anywhere ever again” files, theater goers on Broadway claim to have “eaten alive” by bedbugs during a performance of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. The theater denies the claims. (Gothamist)

A fire prevented the Islamic Society of Mid-Manhattan from prayers on Friday and the Reform Jewish congregation of Central Synagogue stepped up to provide space for their prayers. (HuffPost)

20 restaurants you can actually get into. Tell your friends you “know a guy who can get you in” and be a hero. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 18, 2019 – The “Where Subway Cars Go When They Die” Edition

Broadway’s phantom pooper, the abandoned subway tunnel, a pre-K strike, the 7 train continues to fall apart, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are this week’s late-night subway inconveniences. (Subway Changes)

A look inside the Hudson Yards’ Instagram-bait ‘Snark Park.’ (Gothamist)

Where do subway cars go when they die? They’re dumped into the Atlantic Ocean to become artificial reefs. There are thousands of cars at the bottom of the sea. (6sqft)

One of the two unions representing the city’s pre-K teachers voted to authorize a strike if demands for higher pay are not met. (Chalkbeat)

The federal government dropped their case against the NYCHA now that a monitor has been put in place. (Patch)

The city’s students joined the Global Climate Strike on Friday, inspired by Swedish student Greta Thunberg’s weekly protests. (Gothamist)

Pour out a moldy container in remembrance of the restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health this week. RIP Steinway Street Taco Bell/Pizza Hut. (Patch)

Are you ready for a months-long Industry City rezoning fight? Community Board 7 and City Council member Carlos Menchaca are laying the groundwork for an exhaustive review of how the rezoning would alter the neighborhood. (Curbed)

Kew Gardens’ Community Board voted unanimously against Mayor de Blasio’s 29 story 1.9 million square foot community jail plan. (QNS)

The Hudson Yards has already become part of the city. (@jccoltin)

If you’ve got a spare $25 million lying around, there’s a 26 room mansion on the Upper West Side for sale. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Watch seven years of construction on the Hudson Yards in less than three minutes. Who doesn’t love a time-lapse? (EarthCam)

If you thought real estate was expensive above ground, prices below are to die for. (NY Times)

We’re #1! NYC is the city with the most inadequate housing in the country. (Patch)

Was there a connection between the release of a Gotti from prison and the murder of a Gambino family boss? (NY Times)

More than 40 buildings in Manhattan have their own zip codes. Why? (amNY)

At this point, just don’t stand, drive, or exist under the 7 train’s tracks at any point. It happened again on Friday afternoon. (NY Post)

The Citizen app is a must for New Yorkers. Here’s how it works. (NY Times)

The mayor promised 100,000 jobs all paying more than $50k a year. Two years later no one knows how many jobs were created because the city isn’t keeping track. (NY Times)

Forcible touching, persistent sexual abuse, and public lewdness are all misdemeanors, which is why the subways are seeing multiple offenses from the same set of offenders. (NY Post)

There’s an abandoned wood-burning steam locomotive that runs tunnel underneath Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, which pre-dates the Civil War. One man is convinced that the diary of John Wilkes Booth is buried down there, but no one has stepped inside for nearly a decade. (Newsweek)

The Infatuation’s brunch hit list was updated. Get some reservations or else you might be waiting an hour for that mimosa. (The Infatuation)

Who is Broadway’s mystery pooper? (NY Post)

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