The Briefly for August 20, 2019 – The “Ordering from the Secret Ice Cream Takeout Menu” Edition

Daniel Pantaleo is fired, Mario Batali is out at Eataly, New York is getting a new license plate, turning one apartment into 9, Dog Restaurant Week, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Can you recognize different neighborhoods of the city with their new supertall buildings? (New York YIMBY)

Daniel Pantaleo was fired for using an illegal chokehold which lead to the death of Eric Garner by James O’Neill more than five years after the initial incident. (NY Times)

Daniel Pantaleo’s lawyer says Pantaleo is planning on suing to get his job back. Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr, is not finished now that Pantaleo has been fired. She is calling for the firing of all the officers involved in her son’s death and Pantaleo’s firing is only step one. (Patch)

Two things that go great together: the feeling of exclusivity and ice cream. 10 top NYC restaurants secretly serving to-go ice cream this summer. (Time Out)

From the “now I’ve seen everything” files: it is Dog Restaurant Week in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Eataly, now with 100% less Mario Batali, it only took twenty months. (Grub Street)

Larry K. Griffin II Is being held on a $200,000 bond for allegedly leaving rice cookers at the Fulton Street Station after being arrested on Saturday following an alleged overdose. (Gothamist)

Soul Train pulls in to Broadway in 2021. Yes, it’s a broadway show based on the TV dancing show. (NY Times)

The MTA and the Transit Worker’s Union are off to a great start in negotiating a new contract, with the TWU calling the MTA’s contract offer as part of the organization’s restructuring “insulting.” (amNY)

It was once “thick and wonderful,” but as of late it’s a “disaster.” The “destination hamburger” at Corner Bistro isn’t earning high marks in 2019. (Eater)

The story of the viral video of the subway selfie photo session. (Huff Post)

Yelp has teamed with different restaurants across the city to create a “secret” menu. Check out the list and order off-menu. (amNY)

The Queens Night Market in Rockefeller Center is called Outpost, and it’s been extended through September. (Gothamist)

With a few days between us and the kerfluffle about lady liberty, here are 10 things you might not know about the Statue of Liberty. (6sqft)

The ceilings were under six feet and the living space minimal, all of it illegal. The city busted landlords with “Being John Malkovich” style tiny apartments, turning two apartments into 18. (Gothamist)

New York State is getting a new license plate and you can vote for the winner online. (amNY)

Of course one of Governor Cuomo’s designs features the bridge that Governor Cuomo named after his father. (Gothamist)

Ever notice there’s an animal rug in almost every luxury condo listing in the city? (StreetEasy)

Staten Island District Attorney Michael McMahon illegally paid for an annual St Patrick’s Day breakfast and multiple social events with leftover campaign money from a Congressional run. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Nets and the Barclays Center have a new owner in Joseph Tsai, the co-founder of Alibaba in a deal that values the team at over $2.3 billion and the arena at $1 billion. (Brooklyn Paper)

RIP Al Jackson, star of the Mets pitching squad in the ’60s. (NY Times)

The best wine bars in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 15, 2019 – The “Renaming Trump Tower’s Address to Barack Obama Avenue” Edition

High-end buildings are competing for the best amenities, the NYPD giving citations for imaginary bike lane laws, another 14th St busway lawsuit and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

As 87% of NYCHA homes were without heat at some point last winter, there is a battle being waged amongst the city’s wealthiest to see who can out-do each other with the highest of high-end amenities. (The Real Deal)

The top twelve secrets of Prospect Park. (Untapped Cities)

Do you want to sign the MoveOn.org petition to rename Fifth Avenue between 56th and 57th “President Barack H. Obama Avenue?” It just so happens that is the block where Trump Tower is located. (MoveOn)

NYC Broadway week is September 3-16, and you can get 2-for-1 tickets to 24 different shows. (amNY)

The city and state’s fight against the federal government about the public charge rule is centered around a ridiculous interpretation of the Emma Lazarus’s sonnet “The New Colossus,” which is inscribed on the Statue of Liberty. (Patch)

Only 5 of the 25 LIRR stations in Queens are not ADA compliant and City Comptroller Scott Stringer wants answers and timelines from the MTA to rectify that. (LIC Post)

In praise of stuffed-crust pizza, Hootie and the Blowfish, and Dirty Dancing on VHS as 500 Pizza Hut stores are set to close. (Grub Street)

State Sen. Andrew Gounardes is looking to craft tougher laws to close the arbitrary distance between killing someone with or without a car being involved. (Brooklyn Paper)

A field guide to the weapons of the city’s hostile architecture. (Gothamist)

13 festivals coming to the city from this week through Columbus Day Weekend. (amNY)

After sharing a very obviously racist video, the Sergeants Benevolent Association President and local racist Ed Mullins literally used the “I have black friends” defense. (Gothamist)

If Patti Smith, Morrisey, or Bruce Springsteen on Broadway aren’t your vibe, maybe Tom Morello Off-Broadway in September is more your speed. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A kitten dodging traffic on the lower level of the George Washington Bridge has a happy story to tell and is now available for adopting in New Jersey. (Gothamist)

Riding a horse on a beach isn’t a “very Brooklyn” thing to do, but it’s totally possible. (NY Times)

New York Public Radio (WNYC, WQXR, WNYC Studios, Gothamist, and the Greene Performance Space) has a new CEO in Goli Sheikholeslami, the current CEO of Chicago Public Media. (Gothamist)

The latest lawsuit against the 14th St busway argues the MTA’s removal of bus stops along the route as part of the select service upgrade violates the Americans with Disabilities Act. (amNY)

169 lawsuits were filed in the city during the first day of the Child Victim’s Act, including cases against the Boy Scouts of America, the Catholic dioceses, and Rockefeller University. (Patch)

Okay, so the summer is coming to a close soon. What do you do with your air conditioner? (Gothamist)

If you’re headed to Jacob Riis beach this Saturday but don’t want to be far from Emmy squared’s delicious Detroit-style pizza, you’re in luck, because the Clinton Hill/Williamsburg pizzeria is “delivering” between 1 and 1:45 pm. (Time Out)

A second NYPD officer committed suicide this week, the ninth NYPD suicide in 2019. A name has not yet been released. (amNY)

Video: Headmistress and burlesque dancer Jo Weldon on found freedom, fun and her calling in underground nightlife. (Huff Post)

A Space Jam mural was painted on the basketball court at Rodney Park North in Williamsburg, but the paint that the Parks Department used made the court slippery and unusable. (Brooklyn Paper)

A sanitation worker swapped out the license plates on his car with a set he found in the trash and almost got away with $17,000 in tickets and fines, but he was caught by the Department of Investigation. (Patch)

From The Onion, but you almost might think it was true: NYPD Tickets Dead Cyclist For Obstructing Bike Lane. (The Onion)

This sounds like it could be The Onion, but this is real. Alex Goldmark (from NPR’s Planet Money) was pulled over on his bicycle and given a citation for riding outside of the bike lane on a street where no bike lane exists, which is not illegal. It would be funny if it weren’t an example of the NYPD not having an understanding of the laws they are supposed to enforce. (Patch)

Time Out updated their list of the “best New York pizzas you have to eat” but #3 is inside of their own food hall, so be wary. (Time Out)

The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)