The Briefly for May 15, 2019 – The “Carlos Danger Is At Large” Edition

A Queens city councilmember admits to sexual harassment and keeps his job, answering Broadway’s mysteries, Pride by the numbers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Welcome to Trump Tower, one of NYC’s least desirable luxury buildings. (Bloomberg)

The expanded Statue of Liberty museum is opening on Thursday featuring the original torch and other artifacts and exhibits highlighting the statue, island, and history. Only 20% of the people who step foot on the island visit the current museum. (amNY)

Amnesty International U.S.A. was set to sign a new lease at 88 Pine St until the new landlord said no. That landlord? The Chinese Government. (The Real Deal)

NYC Pride by the numbers on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots. (amNY)

Carlos Danger is at large after serving 18-months in prison for sexting with a minor. (NY Times)

Uh oh. This is the start of talk of a subway strike. (NY Times)

Six historic LGBTQ sites may become NYC landmarks. (6sqft)

The trial of NYPD’s Daniel Pantaleo, accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal choke, continued with Pantaleo’s lawyer blaming Eric Garner’s death on Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

Can a chef who’s earned a two-star Michelin rating change school lunches for the better? (NY Times)

A wine and artisanal food festival at Industry City was interrupted by anti-rezoning protest, specifically aimed at the commercialization of the industrial sector. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci is bringing his masterpiece St. Jerome Praying in the Wilderness to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Time Out)

Council Member Barry Grodenchik has resigned as chair of the Committee on Parks and Recreation after admitting to paying improper attention to a Council staff member, including blowing a kiss to her across a table at a meeting. Gross. (Politico)

Don’t worry, he is “deeply sorry,” and he will not be losing his job on the City Council. (Gothamist)

There was a worry that if New Jersey passed marijuana legalization that New York would have to follow quickly. New Jersey legalized electric bikes and scooters, maybe this will be the kick in the pants that New York finally needs? (Streetsblog)

Photos from inside the Whitney’s Biennial. If you make your way to the Whitney, expect protests against board member Warren Kanders, who has ties to a manufacturer of tear gas canisters used against asylum seekers at the US-Mexico border. (Gothamist)

Rockaway Beach will be fully open this summer after a $10.7 million renovation to prevent catastrophic erosion. 348,000 cubic yards of sand were added to the beach. (Curbed)

Meet Liz Thomas, the professional long-distance hiker who is about to set out on a 175-mile, 100+ park, five borough hike across NYC. (Patch)

If you’ve seen groups of people camping near Central Park for a week, it’s not a protest or a performance art piece or anything like that. BTS is coming to Summerstage. (Gothamist)

The best parks for outdoor grilling. (amNY)

Are Summer Fridays a New York thing, or does it exist everywhere? (StreetEasy)

Today is the first hearing for the proposed fur ban, which pits activists against the fur industry. If New York enacts the ban, it would be following in the footsteps of San Francisco and Los Angeles. (amNY)

Video: A tour of the most expensive neighborhood in New York City. Take a guess on what you think it is before clicking. (Eric Conover)

Congrats! NYC is one of the worst places in the country to try and start a career. (Patch)

Congratulations to City Councilmember-elect Farah Louis on her victory in the special election to fill the vacant 45th City Council district seat. Louis received 41.81% of the vote, which was enough to win. (Kings County Politics)

Answers to the six biggest questions asked on Broadway each night. (NY Times)

The Wednesday Walk: “A Saturday afternoon circuit for some fatty food, but also when you want to seem a little cultured” (GoRoam)

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The Briefly for May 6, 2019 – The “Oh No, He’s Actually Going to Run for President, Isn’t He” Edition

The mayor’s Vision Zero program is beginning to fail, the best tacos, Jagged Little Pill plans to bring people to theaters, teens attacked by acid, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes and diversions are minimally awful. (Subway Changes)

A review of Decade of Fire, playing at the Metrograph, which tackles the topic of the burning of the Bronx in the 70s and the organizations that rallied to rebuild when no one else would. (Curbed)

Oh god. He’s actually going to run for President, isn’t he? (Splinter)

How to spend 12 hours on Governors Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Jagged Little Pill, which may actually be a bad album, is coming to Broadway on November 3 at the Broadhurst Theatre. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The 10 oldest libraries in the city and their secret histories. (Untapped Cities)

Some teens threw a raucous party in the basement of an NYCHA development. The party ended when someone poured an acid-like liquid onto them from above. (NY Times)

Some people are happy with laundry machines in their building. Others get a million dollar yacht, who Rolls-Royces, a Lamborghini, a Hamptons house rental for a summer, and courtside Nets season tickets. Yes, all of those amenities are for one apartment. Welcome to the wildest luxuries for city homes. (Patch)

RIP Lew Fidler. Fidler was a Brooklyn politician, who was a champion for homeless youth in the city council, the environment, and LGBTQ youth. (Politico)

The top twelve brunch spots in the city. Let this serve as a reminder if you want to go anywhere for brunch this weekend. Mother’s Day approaches. (Patch)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants and bars. (amNY)

Scenes from the Union Square cannabis parade and rally from Saturday. (EV Grieve)

It took six years, but the Office of Emergency Management has unveiled lower Manhattan’s solution against a Hurricane Sandy-like storm has arrived. They’ll use… sandbags. Really big sandbags. This took six years. (NY Times)

Margaritaville is a state of mind, but it’s also going to be a resort on the corner of 40th and Seventh Ave. (New York YIMBY)

Katz’s has survived New York since 1888 and New Yorkers have survived Katz’s enormous sandwiches for just as long. I’ll have what she’s having. (Food Insider)

Mark your calendars, November 9 will be Wu-Tang Clan Day, and to celebrate you’ll be able to go to the corner of Targee Street and Vanderbilt Avenue in Staten Island, which is the Wu-Tang Clan District as of this weekend. (The Root)

RIP Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown, who died over the weekend due to Parkinson’s disease complications. Brown was the Queens District Attorney for nearly thirty years and had been on the judiciary since 1973, who had been on a leave of absence from the job since March. (QNS)

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, whose decisions are helping destroy the Amazon and whose racism, homophobia and bigotry tops any racist uncle you’ve got on Facebook, will skip the NYC gala in his honor after it had become clear that New Yorkers will tolerate a lot of punishment, but hosting him is a step too far. (NY Times)

Breathe easy, literally, if you take the L train, the first dust report is in and the concentration of silica dust is well below the benchmarks for dangerous exposure. (NY Times)

BreakfastClub founder and author of BREAKFAST: The Cookbook shares her favorite breakfasts in the city. (Time Out)

Where to have a graduation lunch or dinner. (The Infatuation)

It seems that Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero program has begun to fail. (amNY)

Youfeng Xu was killed crossing Seventh Avenue with the light in Sunset Park, the person behind the wheel of the truck was charged with failure to yield to a pedestrian and failure to exercise due care. (Streetsblog)

A three-year-old boy was killed while in a crosswalk in front of a stop sign by a van in Bath Beach last week on a street that the city has known to be dangerous for at least five years. The driver blamed the child’s death on his mother. (Gothamist)

Candy. Where do you get it? Anywhere? Wrong. You get it at Economy Candy. (ABC 7 NY)

Senior citizens outnumber millennials when it comes to renting apartments. (NY Times)

An ice cream parlor for humans and dogs. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

Here’s how New York’s proposed voter affiliation deadline change could help Bernie Sanders in the 2020 presidential election. (Gothamist)

35 outstanding tacos in NYC. (Eater)

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The Briefly for April 12, 2019 – The “Racist If You Do, Racist If You Don’t” Edition

A hall of fame bad statement about a hit and run, Wegmans is opening this year, a gold steak, the bookmobile returns, the future of street meat, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s something you didn’t want to hear: Getting around on the subways this weekend will be more challenging than usual. (Subway Changes)

Why are there religious exemptions for vaccines? (NY Times)

A dragonstone throne will be inside the West Village Shake Shack in anticipation of Sunday’s Game of Thrones premiere. So unless you’re looking to sit on the throne, you may want to avoid that spot today. (amNY)

The city’s use of SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools was called racist. The city’s attempts to eliminate the SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools is called racist. (Politico)

A 4/20 guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The NYPL bookmobile is making a comeback this summer, with a first test in the Bronx, while the Grand Concourse Library undergoes a renovation. (amNY)

Every city borough (except Staten Island) has a higher audit rate than the rest of the state. What gives? (Patch)

17 of the 21 buildings the city is buying for $173 million are “immediately hazardous,” which includes mice and roach infestations, lead paint issues, water leaks, and broken locks. There are over 400 open violations in the buildings and the landlords are under federal investigation for tax fraud and the lawyer representing them in the sale is a de Blasio fundraiser. Weird. (The Real Deal)

Wegmans will open this fall in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. If you lived or went to college upstate, your palms are probably sweating right now. (Eater)

Ivan Nieves was found guilty of vandalizing the African Burial Ground National Monument, which happened on November 1. (NY Post)

Does the Playboy Club have a place in modern New York City? (NY Times)

The most affordable restaurants in New York, according to 14 chefs. (Grub Street)

There have been some phenomenal F-bombs on local TV over the years, from Sue Simmons’ random outburst to Ernie Asnastos’ chicken “loving” incident. Kudos to Chris Cimino, an NBC weatherman who dropped an F-bomb on live TV at 8:15am. (NY Post)

Broadway is getting a Tina Turner musical this fall. (Time Out)

The city will no longer buy single-use plastic cups, forks, knives, spoons or plates for its agencies and the mayor has indicated he supports a ban on single-use plastic in restaurants too (read: straws), with exemptions for people with disabilities. (amNY)

As New York heads towards decriminalizing marijuana use, how it’s treated by the Administration for Children’s Services needs to change. (Gothamist)

If you’re aware of the L Project, MTA Chairperson Pay Foye says that is proof enough of the MTA’s transparency about the project. Right. (Gothamist)

P.S. 9 Teunis G. Bergen will be renamed the Sarah Smith Garnet School to remove the history associated with the Bergen family as slave-holders. Garnet was the first African-American woman to become a principal in the city. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How did the city let the Y2K GPS crash happen? Don’t ask the mayor, because he already has his excuse. “I was not involved in the planning. It was not something that came up to my level.” (NY Post)

Meet the members of Community Board 6, who will decide the fate of the Gowanus neighborhood with a rezoning vote. (Pardon Me For Asking)

How to ID the fake monks that hang around tourist hot spots. (Viewing NYC)

A permit to sell street meat costs only $300 form the city but goes for $25,000 on the black market, which is why the Councilmember Margaret Chin wants to phase in an additional 4,000 permits over 10 years. Opponents are calling for more regulation before more permits are given out. (Patch)

A literal golden steak? Yup. It’s available on Staten Island. (SI Live)

“I left because, come on, I hit a little girl, I’m going to jail.“ Just when you think we’ve hit a hall of fame bad statement about someone’s alleged part in a hit and run, Julia Litmonovich also said: “What is the big deal, it was an accident.” (NY Post)

“Why can’t white people open Chinese food restaurants?” asks your uncle, who normally reserves this kind of stuff for his Facebook page. This is why. (NY Times)

Where to go when you’re not sure its a date. (The Infatuation)

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