The Briefly for Valentine’s Day 2019 – The “Best Places to Cry in Public” Edition

Blame a pigeon for all your mistakes, a proposed ban on plastic forks and knives, Walt Whitman the Brooklyn Hipster, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

We are less than two weeks away from the special election for Public Advocate. Of the 5.2 million registered voters in the city, less than one million are expected to turn out to vote. (Gotham Gazette)

The white supremacist who stabbed Tim Caughman to death in 2017 in hopes of starting a race war was sentenced to life in prison for murder as terrorism. (NY Times)

The Bronx saw over two billion dollars of real estate investment last year with over half of that in the South Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s best places to cry in public, mapped. (Curbed)

Multiple immigrants are suing ICE for violating their constitutional right and allowing their lawyers to effectively represent them. ICE has refused to bring jailed immigrants to court since last June, preferring to have them represented through video feeds plagued with technical problems. (Patch)

Walt Whitman, Brooklyn hipster. (Brokelyn)

Maybe the L train is cursed. An anti-Nazi sticker caused an entire train to be removed from service in the middle of Wednesday morning’s commute, thanks to MTA policy. (Gothamist)

The oncoming L train construction will cause “on board crowding greater than anything ever experienced on the NYC subway system on a sustained basis,” according to an internal MTA memo. Cursed! (Gothamist)

City Councilman Rafael Espinal is trying to ban plastic forks and knives. Bon appetit, take out eaters. (Eater)

Yeah, you can drink seltzer, but what if you could experience the feeling of drinking seltzer in a retail location? It might sound like nonsense, but once you see photos of Recess’ (the seltzer company) pop-up space, you might understand. Maybe you won’t. (Time Out)

The City Council is calling for the appointment of a special education “czar” to advocate and oversee the implementation of services to children with special needs, as parents are unaware of their rights within the school system. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

During the L train construction, trains will run once every twenty minutes from 8pm-5am on weekdays and all day on the weekends. The G train will have additional service, but the extra cars that were planned on each train will be scrapped. (Streetsblog)

If something goes wrong, blame a pigeon. Classic New York. (Gothamist)

An interactive map of all 1.4 million vehicle collisions since July of 2012. (Todd W. Schneider)

The Reckless Driver Accountability would require a car with five or more red-light and speed camera violations to be impounded until the owner completed a reckless driver accountability program. (Bklyner)

If you’re someone who is perpetually looking for somewhere interesting to go on dates, NYC Date Nite is the IG account for you. “A how-to on dating in NYC, from someone who has done a lot of it.” (@nycdatenite)

Kudos to Gothamist, who actually tried to clean a subway platform in light of the governor’s mocking quotes this week. (Gothamst)

Councilman Jumaane Williams was endorsed by the Kings County Democratic Committee in his bid for Public Advocate. (Bklyner)

Note to other candidates: You can email your endorsements to thebriefly@gmail.com

29 best places to eat vegan in the city. (Grubstreet)

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The Briefly for February 7, 2019 – The “Wait, What is a Pizza Sauna?” Edition

The Public Advocate debate, the porta-potty king, a rooftop glamping sauna, the NYPD targets Waze, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest.

Watch the full Public Advocate debate or read the live blog. (NY1)

Amazon HQ2 was the common punching bag during the debate. (NY Post)

At 115 years, Maspeth’s Grant Street Bridge is ready for a makeover. (QNS)

The MTA’s 24% accessibility at subway stations should be embarrassing enough before the truth comes out about how those numbers are inflated. The subways are planned to be fully accessible by 2034 at a cost of $40 to $60 billion. (Curbed)

The BQX is taking a baby step forward. The city’s Economic Development Corporation is expected to approve a contract that will allow an environmental review. It’s only the first step of a $2.73 billion plan, which is what you might call “one full Amazon.” (Curbed)

This profile of the porta-potty king of New York City is full of crappy puns. (NY Mag)

The best bagels in Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

“Yes, I broke your window because Barack Obama was talking to me and I didn’t like what he was saying.” A perfectly understandable excuse for breaking the window of a Harlem adult shop. (Gothamist)

Lincoln Center has a new president. Henry Timms, who helped create #GivingTuesday, will leave the 92nd Street Y to take the position. (NY Times)

Releasing a banner buoyed by balloons into Grand Central Terminal is a pretty good way to make sure your protest can’t be easily removed. (Gothamist)

Waze is about to get less useful thanks to an . (NY Post)

Google to the NYPD: No thanks. (amNY)

The city is getting a pizza sauna. Yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

The BronxCare Health System will repay sexual assault patients for illegally billing them for rape exams after settling a lawsuit by the NYAG’s office. (amNY)

The state legislature is looking to raise the prison minimum wage to $3/hour. Inmates work six hours a day, five days a week between $0.10 to $1.14/hour. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Pizza sauna not your thing? You could spend time in a sauna while glamping on the roof of a Williamsburg hotel. (Time Out)

Ever wonder how the city’s greenmarkets continue to have fresh produce in the winter? Here’s your answer. (amNY)

Is anyone surprised that the state’s police unions oppose legalizing marijuana? (NY Post)

The Astoria Boulevard N/W station will close for nine months starting in March as elevators are installed. (TimesLedger)

A look at The Pirates, an enclave of fans of of F.C. St. Pauli, a German anti-fascist soccer team. (NY Times)

8 highlights from the new Museum of the Dog. (Untapped Cities)

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The Briefly for January 9, 2019 – The “Great Pizza Recipe Caper of 2019” Edition

The mayor wants to give healthcare to all, Corey johnson wants control of the subways and buses, $26 million was saved in rent thanks to the L train shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Threats of the L train shutdown saved renters in Williamsburg over $26 million in rent. A different version of this story could say “The L train shutdown cost landlords over $26 in rent. (Metro)

“Back of a taxi” is becoming a popular birth spot, with the second baby of the year being delivered while the meter was running. (NY Post)

The second large scale project Staten Island has lost in the last few months when the developers of the Riverside Galleria withdrew their plans after facing pressure from politicians. (The Real Deal)

For now, it seems like you can get a taste of Nolita uptown. The man behind Prince Street Pizza is suing a former chef for allegedly stealing the recipe for his famous spicy pepperoni slice and bringing it to the former chef’s new restaurant Made in New York Pizza on the Upper West Side. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio announce that the city will spend $100 million to provide health care for undocumented immigrants and others who cannot qualify for insurance. His vision is that the city would provide comprehensive care to everyone, including 300,000 undocumented New Yorkers. (NY Times)

The debate over Amazon’s HQ2 has unions squaring off with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’s opposition at odds over the project with the Service Employees International Union and the Building and Construction Trades Council’s support. (The Real Deal)

The best coffee shops for meetings. (The Infatuation)

Welcome to 2019: the home of New York’s worst measles outbreak in decades. (NY Post)

It’s seemed inevitable that Willits Point was headed towards mega-development, but that inevitability has loomed overhead decades. A stadium for the Mets, a mall, and now the Queensborough Football Club have laid claim to the neighborhood, despite decade-old plans for mixed-income housing. (Gothamist)

SNL’s Michael Che is putting together “A Night for NYCHA” this Friday at Irving Plaza to benefit the Fund for Public Housing, featuring Jeff Ross, Michelle Wolf and a “top secret” lineup of comedians. There is a GoFundMe page for people who can’t attend but still want to donate (amNY)

A lawsuit was dismissed that claimed that Danny Meyer sat atop a New York restaurateur illuminati-esque group which sought to pocket tips intended for their staffs. (Eater)

Whatever happened to the toxic dust the MTA claimed would make a partial L train shutdown impossible? (Gothamist)

A Bronx pedestrian was killed by a driver of a city sanitation truck who was preemptively salting Willis Avenue at E. 138th Street. The driver was suspended and is cooperating with the NYPD. (Streetsblog)

What you need to know about the city’s special election for public advocate. (Curbed)

A dog museum? A dog museum. The AKC Museum of the Dog is opening on February 8 at 101 Park Avenue, bringing paintings, prints, sculptures, porcelain figurines, displays and more to two floors, including the first exhibition “For the Love of All Things Dog.” (USA Today)

Mario Batali, famous for orange Crocs, an apology that pairs with pizza dough cinnamon rolls, and being accused of sexual misconduct, will not be facing criminal charges for two sexual assaults that allegedly took place in 2004 and 2005. (Eater)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will reveal a plan to wrestle control of the MTA’s subways and buses from the MTA within the next two months. Will he shutdown the shutdown of the shutdown? (Streetsblog)

A judge blocked Mayor de Blasio’s attempt to move carriage horses inside Central Park instead of being alongside cars on the streets. A full hearing will take place February 8. (NY Post)

Politicians can’t constitutionally block critics on official social media accounts. Looking at you State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself” Parker and City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. (Metro)

38 essential restaurants, winter edition. (Eater)

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