The Briefly for August 5, 2019 – The “Subway Supervillain Has Returned” Edition

Daniel Pantaleo recommended being fired, R Kelly denied bail, how trucks became Vision Zero’s biggest violators, the best lobster rolls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruption lottery winners are the 2, 3, A, #, N and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance Jr. is reviving an investigation into hush-money payments made to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal from the Trump Organization. The investigation will be looking into if the Trump Organization falsified business records. (NY Times)

The city’s subway supervillain was back at it and was arrested for the seventeenth time for a subway-related offense. Isaiah Thompson is the man who was pulling emergency brakes on multiple subways, causing hundreds of delays. His latest arrest was for subway surfing. (NY Times)

The ten oldest parks in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The 42nd Street Shuttle will be “modernized,” which means some temporary delays and reduction of service. How modern? That’s questionable, but at the very least the trains and platforms will be ADA compliant, widened, and the cars themselves extended from four trains to six. (Second Ave Sagas)

The legal fight over the mega-development in the Lower East Side will continue on, but what started it? A 2016 decision by the de Blasio administration to classify residential buildings over eight stories “minor modifications” to the existing developments and could bypass the land review process kicked it off. The towers planned are 1,004-feet tall, 798-feet tall, 728-feet tall, and 724-feet tall, which all seems a bit more than minor modifications. (Bowery Boogie)

Daniel Pantaleo should be fired. That’s the decision that a police administrative judge came to in a Civilian Complaint Review Board case. Will he be? That’s a decision for James O’Neill, the NYPD commissioner, who can decide “no,” despite the judge’s decision. (NY Times)

Eric Garner’s family promised large protests if Pantaleo isn’t fired. (amNY)

What’s the history of the closet-sized “POLICE” building on Lee Avenue in Williamsburg? (Untapped Cities)

The total number of jobs in the city has gone up, but the total number of hours per week is down, essentially neutralizing the job gain when it comes to wages. The city’s lower than the average number of hours per week compared to the nation is an indicator of a substantial income gap that continues to widen. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio put a freeze on new licenses for Uber, Lyft and the like in a hope to reduce the number of cars on the streets and therefore reduce traffic and pollution. He also said, “We are not here to serve the corporate titans, we are here to serve the people.” Unfortunately, the aftermath of this is that cars that have licenses are rented out, creating corporate titans on a smaller scale and further reducing the wages he was hoping to save. (Kings County Politics)

Where to get fun, non-alcoholic drinks in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health has no 100-point violations, but it does include the Greenwich Social food hall. (Patch)

The Algonquin Hotel Cat Fashion Show featured outfits from Ada Nieves, and of course, there are photos. (Untapped Cities)

Why is it that when you send a piece of mail to someone in Brooklyn, but when you send it to Queens it’s sent to a specific neighborhood? There are myths about the reason and the post office can’t be fully be blamed either. It’s a bit of a mystery. (Gothamist)

An odd opinion piece from Polly Trottenberg, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, which seems to be focused on the difficulty the DOT’s job is when they keep getting sued by NIMBYs. (Streetsblog)

The country’s only floating pool is in the Bronx. fwiw, it’s floating on the East River, not in mid-air. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio is accused of using a state election fund to help his cash-strapped presidential campaign, which is a violation of federal finance laws. Law-breaking fundraising is nothing new to de Blasio. (Patch & NY Times)

Video: The Tiffany clock in Grand Central is worth $20 million, here’s why. (Viewing NYC)

R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to sex trafficking charges. (amNY)

He was denied bail, is being held in Brooklyn, and his lawyer claims that he is the real victim. (NY Times)

What are the most expensive homes for sale in each borough? Come on, you know you’re curious. (Patch)

Despite what this etiquette post from Gothamist says, I disagree and say it’s perfectly fine to read text messages from someone else’s screen on the subway. (Gothamist)

Last summer the water fountains on Roosevelt Island were shut off because the water they were serving up was contaminated. There is no indication that they will be functional in 2019. Pack a water bottle. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Highlighted by the recent killing of Em Samolewicz, how did large trucks become Vision Zero’s worst offenders? (Gothamist)

We need new laws that cause much more consequence if a motorist is negligent and they kill someone, even if it wasn’t their intention.” -Mayor de Blasio, responding to a question about on WNYC’s “Ask the Mayor” (Gothamist)

It is time to stop blaming cyclists for the problems on the city’s roads. (NY Times)

There are many reasons not to swim in the lake in Prospect Park, from the signs instructing you not to swim in the lake to the blue-green algae bacteria blooms that produce deadly toxins. Someone decided to give it a try anyway and he was dragged out of the lake by the NYPD and taken for psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD Counterterrorism Bureau asks if you see additional police to “not be alarmed” as they engage in security theater after this weekend’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. (amNY)

Gays Against Guns took to Times Square over the weekend to push for more gun control laws. (amNY)

The five best lobster rolls in the city. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for August 1, 2019 – The “There Are Many Reasons to Dislike Mayor de Blasio” Edition

The Governor’s strategy to stay in the news, mustard ice cream, a call for bike lanes in Long Island City and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Congrats to Queens’ Dalilah Muhammad for breaking a world record in the 400-meter hurdles. (Patch)

Sunday is Lou Reed Thai Chi Day at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch. (amNY)

It took four days of public pressure, but the mayor has finally acknowledged the Brownsville tragedy as a mass shooting. According to the mayor, he’s “come to realize it’s critical we call this what it was.” Would he have changed his mind if not for being publicly chastized about his choice of words? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“De Blasio Appealing To Rural Voters By Touting Destruction Of New York City Under His Watch.” This article from The Onion is so close to reality it’s almost not funny. (The Onion)

All of the 2020 candidates’ favorability ratings increase with the most national exposure they have, except Bill de Blasio. The mayor is the only presidential candidate with a net favorability rating that is under zero. (FiveThirtyEight)

The biggest problem with the mayor is that there are a lot of petty reasons to dislike him, from the time he maybe killed a groundhog in Staten Island to his refusal to not be driven eleven miles to work out, to just being painfully uncool, but for every petty reason there is a substantive reason like his handling of Eric Garner’s death or his multiple ethics scandals or his handling of the Amazon HQ2 situation. Who would continue to run for president despite being universally disliked and polling at virtually zero? The same kind of person that would see 75% of the city he is the mayor of doesn’t want him to run for president in the first place and do it anyway. (Vox)

The mayor is on the presidential trail claiming the city will pass a paid personal leave bill this year, but the city council is not committed to his timeline. (Gotham Gazette)

15 new public art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into law that prohibits school districts to allow teachers or administrators from carrying guns in schools. To quote the governor, the answer to the nation’s school shooting problem “has never been and never will be more guns.” (NY Times)

Have you noticed a steady stream of news about the governor signing bills into law this month? It’s a strategy that Cuomo uses to stay in the news during an otherwise quiet month of the year. (Politico)

Video: What is Louise Jean Signore from the Bronx’s secret to living to 107? Never get married! (Welcome2TheBronx)

The roof of Essex Crossing houses the Essex Crossing Farm. At 10,000 square feet, it’s the largest urban farm in Manhattan and their annual goal is at least 10,000 pounds of produce a year. (Bedford + Bowery)

7 minority-owned businesses in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The mayor is still on pace to hit 300,000 new affordable housing units by 2026, but production has dropped by 22% this year. The difference from 32,344 to 25,299 can partially be attributed to a rare deal made in 2018 for 5,000 units, and not the rent reform laws passed this year, as landlord advocates have claimed. (Gothamist)

The city could do a lot with $40 million, but it’s spent that amount on misconduct lawsuits against the NYPD since January. (Gothamist)

A look at Jay Myself, a documentary which takes a look at the longtime owner of one of the city’s most enigmatic buildings. (Curbed)

City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is calling for a Long Island City bike lane network. (LIC Post)

What has the city done to prevent cyclists from getting doored? “Basically nothing,” according to the founder of the Dutch Reach project. (Gothamist)

How to stay safe as a cyclist, and of course all drivers should know about the Dutch reach. (Brooklyn Based)

A group of luxury homeowners sued to try to stop the city from installing protected bike lanes on Central Park West. It was denied by a judge and construction has begun. (Gothamist)

An interview with Sally Tallant, the new director of the Queens Museum. (Untapped Cities)

The story of 24-year-old David Ballinger, who learned the hard way through a nearly unbelievable series of events that when it comes to finding an apartment in New York City, don’t trust anyone. (Gothamist)

City Comptroller and mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer’s latest opinion piece: We need a childcare revolution in N.Y.C. (The Villager)

Mayoral hopeful and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s latest opinion piece makes the appeal for the Brownsville shooting not to reduce the neighborhood to a stereotype, drawing comparisons to the president’s recent treatment of Baltimore. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed that Amazon seems to be interested in all of New York City except Long Island City? (LICtalk)

Three Republicans in the state’s legislature want to make throwing water on police officers a felony. The Legal Aid Society called the proposed legislation “embarrassing.” (Patch)

The cause of death for Layleen Cubilette-Polanco, the transgender inmate found dead in her Rikers Island cell last month, was due to an epileptic seizure. (Gothamist)

The top 10 hidden beaches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

A day on City Island, which sounds like a little slice of a small New England beach town in the city. (NY Times)

Spend a day in Little Odessa, a neighborhood in complement to Brighton Beach. (amNY)

A look at the fascinating history of Coney Island’s Sea Gate community. (6sqft)

A third person has drowned at Rockaway Beach this year. (amNY)

Mustard ice cream? Yeah, it’s a thing and Coolhaus is giving some away this weekend for National Mustard Day, sponsored by French’s Mustard. (Gothamist)

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The Briefly for July 9, 2019 – The “Attack Rats Leaping From Trash Piles” Edition

Vision Zero is “working” with three deaths in two days, the Jeffrey Epstein case, visualizing your awful subway commute, ice cream in Bushwick, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

What do the city’s weed dealers think about Albany’s failure to legalize marijuana? Most of the ones Gothamist spoke to seemed to be behind the idea of legalization, even if it means changing their business. (Gothamist)

Get “disinfected” at The Museum of Booze. (Atlas Obscura)

We’ve got enough problems before we have to start dealing with rats leaping from the trash. (Patch)

Bastille Day is nearing, do you know how to celebrate? (Grub Street)

The Governor signed a bill into law that will allow the release of President Trump’s state tax returns. (NY Times)

A good way to get shot by an NYPD officer is yelling “Die!” while also yelling that you have a gun. (Patch)

A new tool from The New York Times will visualize how unpredictable your subway commute is so you can quantify your misery. (NY Times)

The Guggenheim Museum on the Upper East Side was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of eight Frank Lloyd Wright buildings that received the honor. (Curbed)

8 Frank Lloyd Wright houses in the city, mapped. (Curbed)

What you need to know about Wednesday’s ticker-tape parade for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team. (6sqft)

In a move that is both horrifying and also not surprising, the Department of Health let the Housing Authority appeal inspectors’ discovery of lead in apartments, leaving children exposed to lead in some cases for years. (Curbed)

For the second time in a month, someone set fire to one of the rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard in the Bronx. The state’s hate crimes task force is investigating. (amNY)

What would the city look like if sea levels rose 100 feet? Mostly underwater according to this map. (Viewing NYC)

A day in the life of Váyalo Cocina’s Ana Fernandez, who came to the United States from Venezuela on vacation and stayed seeking asylum with her wife and sister. You can find Váyalo Cocina at Smorgasburg in Williamsburg on Saturdays (NY Times)

One week into Mayor de Blasio’s major enforcement action against vehicles blocking and parking in bike lanes. Let’s check in to see how it’s going on Second Ave. (Streetsblog)

In what seems like a test to everyone along the L line, the MTA announced that for 9 weeks of nights and weekends there will be no L train service between Lorimer St and Broadway Junction starting July 16 and ending October 4. (Greenpointers)

There’s a whole neighborhood between DUMBO and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. 10 things to know about Vinegar Hill. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Inside the drama, comedy, and tragedy of producing theater outdoors across the city. (amNY)

The federal case against Jeffrey Epstein is centered on his Upper East Side Mansion, where prosecutors say he sexually abused dozens of underage girls in a yearslong sex-trafficking conspiracy. (Patch)

Epstein has pleaded not guilty. (Gothamist)

Inside Epstein’s Upper East Side Mansion, which is one of the largest private homes in Manhattan. (NY Times)

The NYPD plans to launch a peer counseling program later this year in an effort to improve cops’ access to mental-health resources after a string of four suicides in June. (Patch)

Take a video tour of MAD Magazine’s offices as the publication will cease printing new material this summer. (Gothamist)

A look inside the lawsuit the Cabán campaign filed, which highlights a lack of trust in the Board of Elections. (QNS)

The mayor still believes that Vision Zero is “working,” despite three people being killed by drivers in the last two days. (Gothamist)

The city is expanding its initiatives designed to encourage green rooftops after no landlord received a tax credit for it in 2018. (amNY)

8 ice cream spots in and around Bushwick. There are that many ice cream spots in and around Bushwick? Bushwick is whatever you want it to be. Maybe there are a million places to get ice cream in Bushwick and you’ve just never seen them all. (Bushwick)

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