The Briefly for November 16, 2018 – The “A Few Inches of Snow Should Not Be the Apocalypse” Edition

That was only the first snow of the season, the 10 best restaurants in the city, Danny DeVito Day, Simcha Felder switches sides (again), LIC’s history of booms, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It’s the weekend, so take precautions before riding the subway. Like a magician, the MTA will make the L and Q mostly disappear, and multiple other lines are running partial service. All the weekend subway changes. (6sqft)


Winter Storm Avery

What hell happened during Thursday’s storm that the city’s government was so unprepared to deal with the snow?

Turns out the snow storm was worse than predicted. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority shut down before 6pm because of overcrowding. (NY Post)

Staten Island turned into a borough-wide parking lot. (SI Live)

The Bronx was at a standstill. (Welcome2TheBronx)


You’d be surprised at how the MTA finds faulty subway signals. (Gothamist)

The 6 best pumpkin soups in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With Silvercup, Chiclets, Dentyne, PS1, Sunshine Biscuits, and finally to Amazon, Long Island City’s history is one of booms. The neighborhood’s occupancy rate of 98.2% isn’t slowing interest, with real estate searches for LIC spiking nearly 300% in the past few days. (amNY, 6sqft)

The state senate’s biggest marijuana booster is in Nevada, touring the world’s largest marijuana dispensary. Hmmm… (Bklyner)

How can dating in the city get worse? Add 25,000 tech bros to the mix. (NY Post)

Fares are going up in March, ridership is declining, and drastic cuts are coming to service. The MTA’s future is unsustainable. (NY Times)

New York has a taxi driver suicide problem. Roy Kim was the eighth driver in the last year who committed suicide. (Gothamist)

In an attempt to keep up with Uber and Lyft, yellow taxis are offering a 50% discount during rush hours if you use the app Waave. (6sqft)

A new exhibit at the 9/11 museum spotlights the Mohawk ironworkers who helped build One World Trade. The Mohawk ironworkers helped build New York’s iconic skyline, having a hand in the construction of the Statue of Liberty, the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, and the George Washington Bridge. (amNY)

Tea & Sympathy, open since 1980 and a subject of discussion during the gubernatorial Democratic primary, is in danger of closing. The cost of staying in the West Village, $28,000 a month, has caught up with the tea house. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The potentially dangerous flaw in the new Delancey Street bike lane. (Gothamist)

Subway chief Andy Byford is bragging about how he shamed a turnstile jumper into buying a MetroCard. If he can convince 13,333,333,333 more people to buy Metrocards, he’ll pay for his fantasy $40 billion subway plan. (NY Post)

The 10 best restaurants in the city, according to Pete Wells. (NY Times)

Amazon Cuomo thinks that state lawmakers deserve a raise. (NY Post)

Remember the homeless man and the couple who raised money for him and that turned into a mess? Well it turns out the whole thing was a lie! All three are being charged with second-degree conspiracy and theft by deception. (NY Times)

Democrat Simcha Felder, the city’s political equivalent of a Mets fan that runs out to buy a Yankees hat and jersey the day after they make it to the World Series, does not have plans to attend the Republican conference, which he’s been attending since 2012. (Politico)

Danny DeVito Day is a holiday worth celebrating. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for November 5, 2018 – The “You Have to Hear About the Election for One More Day” Edition

A focus on the three ballot initiatives on the back of tomorrow’s ballot, 15 years after the “tiger in Harlem” story, smash your pumpkins, and more in your daily NYC news digest.

A Focus on Tomorrow’s Election
skip to non-election stories
89 polling locations were moved, affecting 200,000 voters in the city. Was yours on the list? (Curbed)

There is a lot of information about nearly every election on your ballot on Tuesday except your votes on judges. Even if you wanted to find more information about the judges on your ballot, you won’t find much. 10/12 judges in Manhattan, 2/18 judges in Brooklyn, 2/11 judges in Queens, 7/20 judges in the Bronx, and 4/6 judges in Staten Island have submitted bios to the Judicial Campaign Ethics Center to educate voters.

Why do we vote for judges?

10 things to watch on election day. (Gotham Gazette)

The Brooklyn Paper highlights the following races:

The ballot proposals:

Proposal 1: Campaign Finance
This proposal would lower the amount that anyone would be able to donate to any candidate for city office and would increase public matching funds from 6:1 to 8:1. The Campaign Finance Board lists 20 arguments in favor of the proposal and four against.

Proposal 2: Civic Engagement Commission
This proposal would create a Civic Engagement Commission. The commission will be tasked with implementing a participatory budgeting program, support and encourage civic engagement efforts, and provide language interpreters at city poll sites in 2020. The Campaign Finance Board lists 20 endorsements for yes and eight for no.

Proposal 3: Community Boards
This proposal would impose term limits on community boards to four consecutive two-year terms. The Campaign Finance Board lists 20 endorsements for yes and 16 for no.

A look at the three proposals on the back of Tuesday’s ballot. (NY Times)


There’s no such thing as free parking, right Alec Baldwin? (Gothamist)

“Kill N******” That’s what was spray painted on the African Burial Ground Monument in Manhattan. What the hell is going on? (NY Times) “Gov. Cuomo, your silence is deafening. Mayor de Blasio, your silence is deafening” The mayor and governor have both been silent about the African Burial Ground vandalism, as pointed out by City Assemblyman Charles Barron. De Blasio and Cuomo have both made public comment about the defacement of Jewish temples. (NY Post)

The racist and anti-Semitic graffiti continues to be found across the city, this time on the Upper West Side. (West Side Rag) 26-year-old James Polite was arrested for writing “Kill all Jews” inside a Brooklyn Heights synagogue. (NY Post) A group of teens threw a metal pole through synagogue window in Clinton Hill. (NY Post)

The more we know about the Saudi sisters who were found dead in the Hudson River, the sadder the story gets. (NY Times) The sisters were denied asylum in the United States and had previously said they would rather commit suicide than go back to Saudi Arabia. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio is “not happy” with his administration at times. Join the club, buddy. (NY Post)

Meet the city’s clock master, 79 year old Marvin Schneider, who resets the city’s grandest clocks by hand. (NY Times)

The city’s new electric buses won’t be ready for the L train shutdown and weekend work will severely limit L train service leading up to the April’s full-time shutdown. (Town & Village)

The history of why Staten Island has never, and likely will never, be connected to the rest of the city via the subway. (amNY)

Does the city’s fight against climate change mean rising rents? (HuffPost)

Capitol Prep Bronx has someone watching over them. Diddy pledged $1 million to the charter school, which will open in September 2019. (Bronx Times)

16 year’s after Jam Master Jay’s shooting death, a new Run-D.M.C. mural is up on the corner of 12th and Ave A. (Bedford + Bowery)

Does the city have room or patience for The Goods Mart, the upscale Los Angeles convenience store? (Gothamist)

How many times have you said “I’m going to go to the Botanical Garden this year” and never gone? Don’t worry, now there’s a live camera so you can look at the foliage without having to, you know, actually look</em at the foliage. (6sqft)

It’s been fifteen years since the “Tiger in Harlem” story, and it’s still one of the city’s strangest. (NY Post)

Smash those pumpkins! The city has multiple pumpkin smashing events happening across the city, some with catapults! It’s not only fun, but it’s what’s best for the environment. (amNY)


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The Briefly for October 22, 2018 – The “I Can Only Search You If You Consent” Edition

Everyone is willing to debate without Governor Cuomo, September was “encouraging” for the MTA, Brooklyn’s witched hexed Kavanaugh, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes. (Subway Changes)

“I can only search you if you consent.” After a four year fight, The Right to Know Act is in effect as of Friday. The NYPD must inform you of your right to refuse a search and also must give you a business card if you're stopped, frisked, or searched. (Gothamist)

Geoffrey Young and John Kinsman, members of the hate group Proud Boys, were arrested and charged with gang assault, attempted assault, riot, and criminal possession of a weapon as a result of the fight that broke out last week. More arrests are expected. (amNY)

Witches in Brooklyn placed a hex on Brett Kavanaugh on Saturday. Did it take hold or did the dozen Christians praying outside in protest prevent the hex? (NY Post)

Manhattan is #1! The #1 most expensive place in the world per square foot. (Viewing NYC)

Rockefeller University Hospital revealed that Dr. Reginald Archibald, a noted pediatrician, who worked at the hospital had been sexually abused and raping children for for decades. Archibald died in 2007 and the hospital is asking former patients to contact them. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s ‘Haunted Subway’ is as scary to kids as a regular commute is scary to adults. (NY Post)

The median asking rent in Bushwick has hit the all-time high of $2,599, which is 80% higher than $1,433, the average rent paid. (Bushwick Daily)

So what’s the story with the guillotine on a rooftop in Greenpoint? (Gothamist)

There’s a $16 million mansion on the Upper West Side that will accept bitcoin, which won’t necessary after you win the $1.6 billion MegaMillions, right? (6sqft)

Cardi B, hero. (People)

The Bowery’s lighting district lost its biggest store. (Bowery Boogie)

The 16 finest restaurants in Hell’s Kitchen. (Eater)

Governor Cuomo (finally) agreed to a gubernatorial debate with Marc Molinaro. (NY Post)

The tickets might be expensive, but it might be worth it to go to a movie theater that’s 21+ after 6pm. (Gothamist)

IUDs will be available at the city’s 11 public hospitals and six ambulatory care centers thanks to a new initiative from the de Blasio administration. (amNY)

A white middle school teacher was fired for making black students in the Bronx re-enact slavery scenes. Patricia Cummings, the teacher in question, denies these claims. (NY Post)

Do you know what the early signs of the measles looks like? It’s ridiculous that we have to have this conversation, but since six children in Williamsburg have the measles, here we are. (Bklyner)

The nanny accused of multiple stabbings inside a day are center, including a 13-day-old baby, is mounting an insanity defense. (NY Post)

September’s subway performance was “very encouraging” according to NYC Transit President Andy Byford. There were only 63,841 delays, the lowest since August 2017. (NY Post)

After an NYPD body camera caught fire, the department is pulling 2,990 from use. (NY Times)

The city’s most endangered buildings. (Curbed)

The Clinton Hill community board just approved a B.I.G. change to St James Place. (Brooklyn Paper)


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