The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 29, 2019 – The “Amazon Comes Crawling Back” Edition

20,000 bees on a street corner, legal weed gains steam (again), 10 hidden bars and restaurants, Manhattanhenge, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city is releasing the results of its study of water fountain parks and the results will inspire you to carry a water bottle with you at all times. (QNS)

Tonight kicks off one of four nights of the year to see Manhattanhenge. (Viewing NYC)

They always come crawling back. Amazon is looking for office space in Midtown West. This won’t likely be 25,000 new jobs, but it seems they can’t stay away. (Curbed)

The top 10 secrets of Citi Field. Some people say if you listen hard enough, you can hear a baseball team playing. (Untapped Cities)

Photos from inside the new Essex Market. (Gothamist)

Nothing to see here, just 20,000 bees hanging out on a street corner in Sunnyside. (Sunnyside Post)

If you’re a superfan of the MTV’s first season of The Real World: New York and have about $8 million sitting around, you’re in luck. The loft is for sale. (Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel’s food hall reopened after a failed health inspection last week. (Eater)

Luna Park housing in Coney Island is losing $500,000 after one of the people in charge was arrested for accepting bribes to help unqualified applicants get apartments. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Kudos to Grub Street for leaving out the most obvious possible entries to their list of 10 hidden restaurants and bars. (Grub Street)

The woman who was hit by a falling branch in Washington Square Park last week is doing better and her doctors are optimistic. Her injuries from the falling branch included skull and spine fractures. (Downtown Express)

Measles cases in Brooklyn have spread beyond the Orthodox Jewish communities in Brooklyn and the numbers have hit the double digits. Sunset Park has a high vaccination rate and the outbreak should be contained. The city’s total number is up to 535. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The calls for an end to the religious exemption for vaccines are growing. (Patch)

Community Board 6 attempted to save Red Hook’s Lidgerwood Building which dates back to 1882 with a plea to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, but it was demolished last weekend to make way for a UPS facility. (Bklyner)

Video: The next best thing to riding the Wonder Wheel is experiencing it in 4k and 60 frames per second. (ActionKid)

A look at the life of the Lincoln Memorial’s sculptor Daniel Chester French, a resident of Greenwich Village. (GVSHP)

RIP the second incarnation of Hank’s Saloon. The owners of Hill Country Barbeque Market are shutting down their food hall and evicting Hank’s in the process. (Gothamist)

Sports betting in New York? The governor says it’s possible. (Politico)

17 waterfront restaurants to enjoy when we’re not being threatened with tornado warnings. (Eater)

Mina Malik joined fellow candidate Tiffany Cabán in announcing that as the Queens District Attorney, she will not prosecute sex workers. (QNS)

Momentum is growing (again) for marijuana legalization, but we’ve heard this song twice this year without results. The bill doesn’t have the governor’s full support. The governor cites a lack of support from the legislature and the legislature cites a lack of support from the governor. (Gothamist)

Following the moves of the workers of the Tenement Museum, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, and the New Museum, BAM workers are seeking to unionize. (Bedford + Bowery)

The personal hip-hop collection of Fab 5 Freddy was purchased by the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, which will ensure that the earliest days of hip-hop have a permanent home as a piece of history. (Atlas Obscura)

Turns out allowing cyclists to follow pedestrian signals and not traffic lights would make the streets safer, according to a new study from the city. (amNY)

Where to drink right now. The Infatuation’s regularly updated list has been, as you might have guessed, updated with Coast and Valley and Jungle Bird. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for October 19, 2018 – The “Tompkins Square Park Dog Parade is Back!” Edition

The Met and Brooklyn Museum stop accepting Saudi money, Apple makes an announcement in Brooklyn, a measles outbreak in Williamsburg, Central Park but not Central Park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway changes are…complicated.

The Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade has risen from the dead like a Central Park zombie raccoon! The parade will be hosted by ESPN’s Katie Nolan and held on October 28. (amNY)

What’s your opinion of Marc Molinaro? If you’re a voter, there’s a 48% chance you don’t have one. (Politico)

What would Central Park look like if the proposal by John J. Rink won the design contest? Pretty trippy according to these new renderings of his design. (Viewing NYC)

The Clark Street subway station is a “imminent public safety threat” according to Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. The three 23-year-old elevators that service the platform are the only way to get up the ten flights to the street. (Gothamist)

If you insist on bringing your tree on the subway, please do so during non-rush hours.

A good reminder about the laws about heat now that it’s cold. From October 1 to May 31 from 6 am to 10 pm, if it’s below 55° F outside, your landlord must keep the building at least 68° F inside. At night, from 10 pm to 6 am, the building must be at least 62° F inside. If you want to file a complaint against your building, you can call 311 or file a complaint online. (Bklyner)

MoviePass is under investigation from the New York Attorney General’s office that it misled investors. This won’t get your unlimited movie tickets back, but it might make you feel better to see them lose a court case. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Will the 2018 “blue wave” overtake Staten Island’s NYC GOP alcove or will it hit a red wall? Republican Dan Donovan hopes to hold back Democrat Max Rose and remain NYC’s sole GOP congressperson. (Gothamist)

Breathe a sigh of release, peak bedbug season is behind us. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s Chief Democracy Officer Ayirini Fonseca-Sabune remains in hot water with the Board of Elections over a confusing elections mailer to 400,000 city voters that cost $200,000. Whoops. (NY Post)

There’s a measles outbreak in Williamsburg’s ultra-Orthodox Jewish community due to unvaccinated children. An investigation into the outbreak and an attempt to contain it has had a direct cost of almost $400,000. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Mayor denies that he lied about his public comments that underplayed the number of children exposed to lead. The mayor’s current excuse is that “the federal stand’s changed over time,” which is a lot like his story about this issue. (NY Post)

Known jerk and leader of the SPLC designated hate group Gavin McInnes is delinquent on his taxes in New York.

The NYCHA will hire two private companies to help the 41 NYCHA housing complexes maintain heat this winter. Last year more than 80% of apartments (323,000 people) went without heat for an average of 48 hours at a time. This week 4,000 NYCHA tenants are enduring a heat and hot-water outage. (Politico)

A security guard was caught hiding his phone in an NYPD women’s bathroom in Brooklyn. Pedro Rodriguez Sanchez was arrested for unlawful surveillance in the second degree. (NY Post)

Marty Markowitz once dreamed of having an Apple Store in Brooklyn, and that dream was realized in 2016. Two years later Apple is set to announce something new at BAM (probably a new iPad and maybe new computers) on October 30. (Daring Fireball)

The Met and the Brooklyn Museum will no longer use Saudi money for programs on Middle Eastern art that had been supported by groups tied tot he Saudi government. (NY Times)

A Trump “Pee on Me” statue has found its way to Manhattan.


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