The Briefly for September 5, 2019 – The “Summer Vacation is Ending for the Mayor” Edition

More L train changes announced, stop dropping your AirPods on the subway tracks, renaming the city for women, a mystery tomato grows, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Since firing NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo for his illegal chokehold that lead to the death of Eric Garner, there has been a decline in arrests and summonses all across the city. (amNY)

Summer break is over for the city’s students but concerns about lead paint in classrooms is still going strong. (Gothamist)

The city’s new speed cameras turn on this week from 6 am to 10 pm. Cameras are located within a quarter-mile of the city’s 1,840 public schools and tickets will cost $50. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

No matter what the city eventually decides to do about the gifted and talented programs, New York City Chancellor Richard Carranza has said not to expect any changes this year. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

May de Blasio might drop out of the presidential race if he doesn’t qualify for the fourth debate. We may get a full-time mayor back on October 1. (NY Times)

Maybe de Blasio is better being a part-time mayor if his full-time thoughts would include considering requiring licenses for bike riders. (Streetsblog)

Video: The secrets of Grand Central Terminal. (Viewing NYC)

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Friends, a terrible TV show, Warner Brothers Television is putting 30 replicas of the orange couch around the country, including multiple NYC locations. (amNY)

Warner Brothers attempted to put a couch in Greenwich Village, theoretical home to the irredeemable idiots on the show, but Community Board 2 said no. (Gothamist)

The city could see remnants of Hurricane Dorian on Friday with heavy rain and wind. (Patch)

Stop dropping your AirPods onto the subway tracks. The MTA is tired of retrieving them. (Gothamist)

How did a tomato end up growing out of a piling near the Brooklyn Bridge? (Gothamist)

Tax policy gave us the summer of spiked seltzer. (Grub Street)

What if the city’s subway stops were all named for women? That’s the idea behind the City of Women map, currently on display at the Transit Museum. Would naming a subway stop after Lena Dunham be worse than naming one after Peter Schermerhorn, who was best known for owning a rope factory? (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The elevators in NYCHA buildings are constantly breaking down, which makes sense once you understand the budget to fix them is $74 million, which falls short of the needed $1.5 billion. (Curbed)

Video: Meet the city’s “Mother Pigeon,” performance artist Tina Piña Trachtenburg. (Video NYC)

A walking tour of 1949 Greenwich Village. (Curbed)

The MTA announced how it plans to make L train service worse on nights and weekends as it continues its L Train Slowdown work. These changes are to make accommodation for elevator and escalator construction. (Gothamist)

A look at where we are with the mayor’s $8.7 billion plan to replace Rikers Island with four community jails. (NY Times)

The 15 most anticipated restaurant openings of the fall, according to Eater. (Eater)

Thanks to Chris for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for May 1, 2019 – The “Wouldn’t We All Love to Ban Tour Guides With Groups” Edition

ApplePay comes to the MTA this summer, Tony Award nominations are in, the Dept of Education is accused of failing to protect students from sexual assault, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The mayor’s “Turning the Tide on the Homeless” program is facing criticism in a new report from the Coalition for the Homeless. The city’s homeless population has grown by 10% for each year Mayor de Blasio has been in office. January was a record-breaking year for the number of men, women, and children spending each night in a shelter at 64,000. (Gothamist)

The list of Tony nominations are in. This year’s big winner is “Hadestown” with 14 nominations. (NY Times)

A new lawsuit filed this week accuses the NYC Department of Education of failing to protect students against sexual assaults, file official complaints, conduct proper investigations, and support survivors dealing with trauma. Legal Services NYC filed the lawsuit on behalf of four girls aged 12 to 18. (Gothamist)

The National Park Service took an action on Liberty Island that most of us wish we could take anywhere we need to go: banned tour guides. (NY Times)

The Essex Market opened in 1940 at the behest of Mayor Fiorello Laguardia. This May the market’s original location closes to move across the street. (Untapped Cities)

“The one that I almost leapt over the counter to get was a quesadilla panino.” Eater’s weekly sandwich column from Robert Sietsema got a bit intense. (Eater)

Coney Island is getting another music venue, located in the center of the Coney Island Art Walls. “Amuse” will have a capacity of 4,000 and have programming between Memorial and Labor Day. (Gothamist)

If you’re looking to make an appreciable change in the city, the charter review process is your opportunity. (Curbed)

Was the body found under the Verrazzano Bridge an NYC Marathon runner? The body under the Verrazzano was one of two bodies found in the city’s waters last weekend. (Gothamist)

An Absolut Ban. An executive order from the mayor put the kibosh on newsstands, bus shelters, and LinkNYC alcohol ads, sponsorship or branding. The city doesn’t expect to lose any revenue as a result of the ban. (Patch)

What’s going on with the hundreds of “unfounded” rape cases in Queens? The 14.2% of reported rapes in Queens being unfounded is significantly higher than the city’s other boroughs. (QNS)

The problem with the city’s plan to divert L train riders to the J and M trains is that the J and M trains are just as reliable as they’ve ever been. Overnight Monday a switch problem brought both train lines to a halt, effectively turning the L train slowdown into a full-on East River shutdown. (Gothamist)

Today is the anniversary of the Empire State Building’s opening in 1931. A piece of trivia to unlease on unsuspecting people in your life. (GVSHP)

Speaking of trivia… tonight’s the night for JOHN TRVIALTA at Parklife:

Amazon is still coming to Queens but in the form of a new distribution center in Woodside. (The City)

Bronx Councilmember Andy King was accused of sexual harassment for the second time in two years. King is refusing to cooperate with the City Council. (Patch)

Billionaires’ Row is missing something significant. Billionaires. Nearly half of the apartments are unsold, including some buildings seven years old that remain half empty. (Curbed)

Take a look, because there are new renderings of Brooklyn’s Wegmans. (6sqft)

The Queens Library got a six-month extension on their Court Square lease to remain in the building through March 31, 2020. (LIC Post)

The NYPD found a new way to make biking or walking over the Brooklyn Bridge a nightmare. (Streetsblog)

What’s that tree outside your building? There’s a map for that. The New York City Street Tree Map is the world’s most accurate and detailed map of a city’s street trees. (Viewing NYC)

The art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

Nomiki Konst is under fire for questionable practices and payments during her Public Advocate campaign and is accused of being a “plan from the right.” You’d be forgiven if you couldn’t remember her or her campaign, she only garnered 2% of the vote. Konst’s campaign manager came forward about questionable donations, which were publicly matched, and even more questionable invoices. Konst has attempted to distance herself from the potential scandal, but she served as her own treasurer, which makes her legally responsible for her campaign’s financial system. (Politico)

Soon your apartment may be powered by poop! No, we’re not talking about your roommate. (Gothamist)

An appellate court upheld the city’s measles vaccination mandate on Monday, denying a request for a temporary restraining order by a group of anti-vaxxer parents as the number of confirmed cases in New York City rose to 423. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With all the measles talk going around, you’re not alone if you’re wondering if you should get yourself a booster shot as an adult. (NY Times)

Story update. Remember how the Board of Elections put all the city’s voter rolls online for anyone to look at? Well, that’s over. The BOE realized that maybe posting all of our names, addresses and party affiliations online wasn’t the best idea. (NY Times)

The MTA will begin support for ApplePay in the “early summer,” as the OMNY system is scheduled to go live on some 4, 5, and 6 train stops on May 31. (Engadget)

The latest city landmark debate is over Tin Pan Alley, the birthplace of popular music. The conversation made a surprising turn towards some of the racism expressed in songs created there. (Curbed)

The “NOT GONNA SUCK YOUR DICK” graffiti tag is getting attention. (Bowery Boogie)

Featured walk: The essential Upper West Side. (GoRoam)

Where to go if you want to eat a burger at the bar by yourself. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 21, 2019 – The “Curious Curse of the Lettered Subway Lines” Edition

A Citi BIke valet, the city’s most popular dog breed, the Museum of Natural History gets an update, the robot Instagram influencer, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city’s most popular dog breed is the french bulldog, according to the AKC, but that only counts registered purebred dogs. (amNY)

Five ways to fix the Brooklyn Bridge’s pedestrian problem. (Streetsblog)

One year later, Cynthia Nixon has no regrets about running for governor. (Time)

When it comes to subway lines, the lettered lines are cursed. (NY Times)

“Hello. You can help everyone have a great trip. Please use headphones at a volume only you can hear.” (Patch)

Starting today you can vote on a new logo for POPS (Privately Owned Public Spaces) across the city. (Curbed)

The 17th-century meeting between Dutch settlers and the Lenape tribe portrayed in a diorama in the American Museum of Natural History hasn’t changed, but the museum has added 10 stickers to the glass to correct inaccuracies. (NY Times)

The list of politicians who support a two-strikes ban for serial sex offenders on the subway is growing and now includes Governor Cuomo. (Gothamist)

An exterminator explains where he’d never want to live in the city. (Science Insider)

Central Park’s spring guide is officially available, giving you flora and fauna knowledge of every corner of the 840 acres. (6sqft)

It seems everyone has an idea of how the BQE in Brooklyn Heights can be changed. The latest design buries the BQE and extends Brooklyn Bridge Park to create a tri-line park and promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The latest subway riding dog you need to see today is the backpacked Mad Maxine, Fluffy Road. (@madmax_fluffyroad)

Are Mayor de Blasio’s rezonings segregating the city? Advocates are calling for a racial impact study before the rezonings move forward. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The first self-driving cars in the city are coming to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. They’ll be doing a loop between the ferry dock and the intersection of Flushing Ave and Cumberland St. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

13 perfect NYC springtime strolls. (Curbed)

How The New York Times decides what to investigate. (NY Times)

The latest Instagram influencer is a bot created to score its creator free meals across the city. We’ve lost the John Henry battle on Instagram. (Chris Buetti)

Real casinos in the city? Wanna bet? (NY Times)

34 former students from Yeshiva University are preparing a class action lawsuit alleging sexual abuse that spanned from the ’60s to the ’90s thanks to the state’s temporary lifting of the statute of limitations. (NY Post)

41% of New Yorkers feel like they can’t afford to live in New York state and think they’ll be forced to move in the next five years. (Patch)

The 2020 census, explained. (amNY)

Advocates are calling for a temporary bike lane to be installed on the Verrazzano Bridge on summer weekends. The bridge is owned by the MTA, so it’s not a city decision. (Gothamist)

If a neighborhood was going to get an official Citi Bike valet, of course, it’s the Upper West Side. (West Side Rag)

Forget the peanuts and Cracker Jack. The Yankees have It’s time to sound off. (Patch)

What makes a “real” New Yorker? The founder of Gothamist has some criteria. (Brooklyn Paper Radio)

A look at “the most demonic store on St Marks:” Search & Destroy. (What Should We Do)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

16 new restaurant openings. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.