The Briefly for October 24, 2019 – The “De Blasio Goes to War With the Lower East Side” Edition

The city is retiming traffic lights for cyclists, the special ingredients in the city’s water, it’s worth freaking out about Wegmans, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Want to live somewhere affordable, but still be in the city? Check out these 15 Queens streets, which are some of the most affordable in the city. (QNS.com)

The Union Square tech hub has a new name. Is Zero Irving any better of a name? (Curbed)

With the highest body count of cyclists killed by drivers in the city in twenty years, the city has begun to reconfigure the timing of traffic lights to better cater to cyclists to make the streets safer. (NY Times)

The mayor’s latest war is against the Lower East Side, with a new “quality of life” campaign for a six-block area that encompasses more than 80 bars and restaurants. They’re using a name that rolls right off the tongue: The Late-Night Quality of Life Improvement Plan. (Curbed)

10 hidden gems in Crown Heights. (Untapped New York)

A chill in the air means it’s the first hints of cuffing season. Here are 10 date ideas you can do on a Citi Bike. (Bushwick Daily)

The ice skating rinks in Central Park have dropped their Trump branding, but make no mistakes, they’ll still be operated by the Trump Organization. Turns out having Trump’s name on things doesn’t help business in New York City. (Curbed)

I don’t think that a Wegmans opening in Brooklyn is a big deal, but my wife who grew up upstate insists that I am very wrong and it’s worth freaking out about Wegmans. (Eater)

The troubled Squibb Bridge that connected Brooklyn Heights to Brooklyn Bridge Park has been demolished after opening in 2013, closing in 2014 and not opening again until 2017 and then closed again in 2018. (Curbed)

A guide on where to eat, drink, shop, and more in Industry City. (StreetEasy)

To combat the high number of NYPD suicides this year, the department is offering free, confidential mental health care as part of the “Finest Care” program. (Patch)

What’s in the city’s water that makes it taste so great? It might be the 270 cancer, brain damage, and pregnancy complicating chemicals found in a recent study by the Environmental World Group. (Patch)

Where to go when you’ve got a blind date. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 30, 2019 – The “Never-Ending DA Election is Going to Court” Edition

Where rents are rising and falling, the top binge drinking neighborhoods in Brooklyn, the governor changes pot possession laws, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Members of The Proud Boys, a hate group according to the SPLC, are headed to trial for rioting for their fights with antifa protestors from an Upper East Side event in October. They’be being charged with rioting rather than assault because the antifa members who were involved are not cooperating with the NYPD. (NY Times)

Dave Chang has a new restaurant in the South Street Seaport. Is Bar Wayō enough to make you want to go to the financial district or will the neighborhood continue to be I Am Legend after 6:00? (Grub Street)

The New York City Board of Elections unanimously certified the results of the full, manual recount in the race for the Democratic nomination for Queens District Attorney. Melinda Katz won the primary. (Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán and Melinda Katz’s campaigns will head to court on Wednesday to continue the June 25 Democratic primary until the bitter end. (NY Times)

Brooklyn Heights/Fort Greene and Park Slope/Carroll Gardens are the current kings of Kings County binge drinking, which also happen to be the two wealthiest districts in the borough. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Is public shaming enough to get NYC to change the name of “Negro Point,” which is a real spot on Randall’s Island? (Huff Post)

A $24 million dollar offer for his four-story building in the Upper East Side, denied. The story of one man who refuses to sell out in an attempt to preserve a neighborhood he perceives to be disappearing. (NY Times)

Hail seitan! Brooklyn is getting the first fully vegan sandwich shop in Seitan’s Helper at Precious Metal. (Bushwick Daily)

In an attempt to make the waiting experience less boring, the Empire State Building has a new gallery that is part Instagram-bait and part waiting area. (amNY)

Congressperson Yvette Clark introduced a bill that would ban the use of facial recognition technology from public housing. Face, voice, fingerprint and DNA identification tech would be banned from any housing that receives federal aid. (Curbed)

What’s in a name like Stone Street, Waverly Place, or Gold St? The hidden history behind 15 street names in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The South Bronx, Concourse Village, and Brownsville are the neighborhoods with the fastest rising rents. The biggest drops were in Maspeth (post-Amazon related?) and Borough Park. (Patch)

If you don’t know the name Sam Rudy, you know his work. His 40 years as a theater publicist included recent work on shows like Hamilton and Avenue Q. The Times interviewed him as he retires to Pennsylvania. (NY Times)

The Williamsburg Bayside Oil Depot is scheduled to be demolished. What’s that? Yes, of course, there is someone arguing that they should be saved. (6sqft)

The governor signed the bill into law that changes possession of up to two ounces of pot to a violation instead of a misdemeanor, meaning you’ll be fined instead of sent to jail. It also creates a process for records of certain charges of possession to be expunged. (Patch)

When he was 26, Carmine Cataldo thought his job running the newsstand at the Brooklyn Supreme Court was temporary. 36 years later, he’s retiring. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to the Rockaways. Start planning your weekend. (6sqft)

It’s not summer until the nutcracker vendors hit the beaches. Unfortunately, the NYPD is attempting to change that in Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

People of color were significantly underrepresented in the city’s arts organizations and city government is starting to ask them to find ways to change. (NY Times)

The president signed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund into law, providing financial support through 2090 to those injured or developed diseases due to their work after the attacks. (amNY)

Unsurprisingly, Trump made the signing of the bill about himself, continuing his history lying and exploitation of the 9/11 attacksthe city’s 18th cyclist killed by a driver. Em was doored by a driver and sent into the street where she was hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

After the killing of Em Samolewicz, here is the city’s most dangerous intersections. (Curbed)

A palate cleanser. Three baby ducks were rescued from a sewer drain in Park Slope after being spooked by a dog. The ducks are recovering at the Sean Casey Animal Rescue. (Gothamist)

Emily Waters is giving away her art on Instagram. Meet the artist who is trying to assuage the constant stress of life with delight. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd “identified a flawed connection between some of the sensors and protective relays” which caused the July 13 blackout in Manhattan. (amNY)

The best museums in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for May 16, 2019 – The “Maybe NYC is Better Off With An Absentee Mayor?” Edition

The TWA Hotel is open, the best tiki bars in the city, the governor blocks the Williams gas pipeline, a helicopter crashed in the Hudson, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A new bill is looking to ban landlords from using facial recognition technology in their buildings and would allow tenants to pursue civil lawsuits against any landlord who did. (Gothamist)

You’ve got four chances to check out Manhattanhenge this summer, starting in two weeks. (amNY)

By the time you read this, there’s a good chance that our dummy of a mayor has decided to not listen to New Yorkers, or his friends, or common sense, or the rest of the country, and launched his presidential bid on Good Morning America. Maybe the city will be better off if he’s never around? (Splinter)

The City Council wants to provide the NYPD with more funding for the understaffed Collision Investigation Squad to investigate the 2,000 – 3,000 fatal crashes annually, of which they respond to just over 5% of. James O’Neill, NYPD commissioner, isn’t interested. (Streetsblog)

A dump truck driver struck and killed a 58-year-old man while he was crossing W. 21st Street in Coney Island on Saturday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The TWA Hotel is open in all its retro glory. (Curbed)

More photos from inside the TWA Hotel. (6sqft)

Has the TWA Hotel truly opened if there was not a list of ten fun facts about it? (Untapped Cities)

New York City is nothing without its eccentricities, including Washington Square Park’s Bubble Man, Stephen Duncan. (GVSHP)

The best happy hours in Brooklyn. (The Infatuation)

There are over 1.6 million feet of sidewalk sheds in the city, and now there’s an interactive map to keep tabs on them all. (Viewing NYC)

Over 120,000 New Yorkers rely on the MTA’s Acess-A-Ride to get around the city, but just because they rely on it, it doesn’t mean it’s at all reliable. (NY Times)

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, except when it comes to the big dumb idiots at Big Seven Travel, which declared the Boston Accent “sexier” than the New York accent. (Patch)

A look at Cafe Phin, the city’s only authentic Vietnamese coffee roaster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will no longer accept gifts from the human monsters of the Sackler family, architects of the country’s opioid crisis. (NY Times)

The gala honoring Brazil’s president and the man who is so outwardly homophobic it wouldn’t be a shock if he was secretly gay himself Jair Bolsonaro happened without his presence, but not without interruptions and protests. (Gothamist)

How did the subway lines get their letters or numbers? Let’s take a look. (amNY)

LaGuardia and JFK are nowhere near the top-ranked airports in the world, which is no shock to anyone who has the dubious pleasure of traveling through them. (Patch)

Don’t look now, but the company responsible for Northside Festival and Brooklyn Magazine, which had held tens of thousands of dollar from former employees, seems to have ghosted. The website for the festival says the 2019 information is “coming soon.” (Gothamist)

Check out the architectural finalists for the city’s Big Ideas for Small Lots NYC competition, which challenged firms to design affordable housing on small lots across the city. (Curbed)

A “severely decomposed” body was found in the basement of a Brooklyn Heights building by maintenance workers. An NYPD investigation is ongoing. (Bklyner)

Marijuana isn’t legal for recreational use, but that hasn’t stopped the state legislature from moving on to “important” issues like trying to make texting or using or looking at any portable electronic device while crossing the road punishable by fines. (Gothamist)

A helicopter operated by “the Uber of helicopters” Blade landed in the Hudson River on Wednesday with no serious injuries or deaths, so it’s safe to watch the videos of it all going down without guilt. (Gothamist)

Non-profit internet service provider and privacy-friendly company NYC Mesh is expanding its service to Greenpoint. (Greenpointers)

Governor Cuomo’s administration blocked the Williams gas pipeline that would terminate just off the Rockaways, pointing out it would result in a failure to meet the state’s water quality standards. The company plans on reapplying, but with the governor’s focus on environmental issues, the chance of approval seems very low. (Politico)

The absolute best places for tiki drinks in the city. (Grub Street)

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