The Briefly for December 21, 2018 – The “What A Federal Shutdown Means for New York” Edition

Weekend subway changes, Pilotworks is dead (again), the Nobel Peace Prize winning Santa, the E and M trains get their own mini-shutdown, Christmas in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway changes and construction. (Subway Weekender)

10 must-visit spots in Long Island City. You should probably visit before Bezos moves in. (Untapped Cities)

20 candidates in a 90 minute Q&A session. The Public Advocate election is getting crowded. (Bklyner)

The man who promised to save the dead Brooklyn food incubator Pilotworks has decided to back out of the deal. (Eater)

Here’s what a federal government shutdown would mean for New York City. (Patch)

The city’s Independent Budget Office says the city’s financial situation is “relatively strong,” but admits the city faces “significant uncertainty” around public services like the subway, the NYCHA, and public hospitals. (Metro)

Harvey Weinstein’s request to dismiss his sexual assault charge was denied and the case will go forward. (NY Times)

If you thought the L train shutdown or the BQE replacement was going to be a mess, just wait for the twenty year work on the Grand Central Terminal train shed. The train shed is the size of 20 football fields and runs from 42nd Street to 57th Street. (6sqft)

New York City is Atlas Obscura’s most popular destination of 2018. Duh. (amNY)

The man who portrays Santa in Bryant Park is a Nobel Peace Prize-winner for being a charter member of the American branch of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War. What do you want for Christmas? This Santa already brought us a small slice of world peace. (amNY)

No matter how rough your SantaCon was, it wasn’t as bad as Christopher Visone’s, who just woke up from his medically induced coma. (Gothamist)

Parking Summons Advocate Jean Wesh will finally open his lower Manhattan office today after eight months being on the job. (NY Post)

Say goodbye to the E and M tunnel between Queens and Manhattan. It’s not exactly the L train shutdown, it will be closed from December 26 until December 31 for repairs. (LIC Post)

Calvert Vaux’s fingerprint is all over the city. Learn about the co-designer of Central Park and multiple landmarks across the city. (GVSHP)

So this is Christmas. How are you going to get around the city? (Curbed)

He snuck prostitutes into his apartment in suitcases and other details you didn’t want to know about Eliot Spitzer’s sex life. (NY Post)

L train shutdown be damned. Retail real estate in Williamsburg is the highest among 16 retail corridors in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’d rather do anything than take the train to Dyker Heights on a winter night, you can check out the photos instead. (amNY)

The city is lying when they boast about building 20.9 miles of protected bike lanes in 2018. The real number is 23% less. (Streetsblog)

Congestion pricing will not take effect January 1, thanks to a lawsuit on behalf of the taxi industry, claiming the practice is discriminatory. The ruling by Supreme Court Justice Martin Schulman will delay the start until a full hearing can be scheduled. (NY Post)

A little league baseball field isn’t the ideal location for a four year parking lot for construction vehicles, but that’s what the West Side Little League is looking at. (West Side Rag)

State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself!” Parker is signing up for Thrive NYC’s mental-health courses after his outburst on Twitter. No word on what he’ll do about his car sporting the wrong license plate, a lapsed inspection, and an un-authorized parking placard. (NY Post)

A story of two old friends who met on New Year’s Eve on 1979 while watching the ball drop from their respective taxis, and how their close friendship has changed over the years to provide a support structure against the harshness of an uncaring city. (NY Times)

A look at ABC No Rio’s four story “Passive House” building, set to begin construction next year. (Bowery Boogie)

The 12 best restaurants in Brooklyn Heights. (GrubStreet)

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The Briefly for December 4, 2018 – The “Bird Hipsters Cared About Ducks Before It Was Cool” Edition

The Manhattan Ikea has an address (and Bloomingdale’s has a new neighbor), Joseph Esposito is Schrödinger’s head of OEM, the MTA focuses on fare evaders, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Monday’s awful commute was brought to you by the F and G trains, with support from the N. No word yet on how the new signals on the 7 train functioned. (NY Post)

The couple who lost their engagement ring during a botched engagement in Times Square were reunited with their ring. (Gothamist)

The only place to get your Game of Thrones MetroCards are at Grand Central Terminal starting today. (Gothamist)

The planned Manhattan Ikea has an address. At the corner of E 59th Street and Third Ave, Bloomingdale’s will have a new Swedish neighbor. (6sqft)

Where’s the center of NYC? (Untapped Cities)

The most chronically flooded streets in the city. (Curbed)

NYC’s brand new breed, the Bird Hipster, cared about seeing birds before it became everyone’s Mandarin Crush Monday. (NY Times)

Two Boots has a tax problem. The Hell’s Kitchen location was seized by the state for $175,426 in unpaid taxes. You could really help them out by buying 6,060 large “The Dude” pies. (Eater)

Modern day Santa Claus, who is very real and busy at work making LOL dolls and Nintendo Switches, was created by a group of NYC artists in the early 1800s. (6sqft)

The rats have taken the subways. (Gothamist)

At 1:37pm, Joseph Esposito, the head of the city’s Office of Emergency Management, was fired for the city’s handling of the November 15 snow storm. At 2:37pm, Mr. Esposito was still in his office, working, despite being “fired” last Friday. At 12:26am, he was staying in his job until a successor is found. Why is the mayor so bad at firing top officials? (NY Post, NY Times, and NY Post, respectively)

Before 9/11, immigrants could get drivers licenses in New York, regardless of their legal status. Immigrant rights advocates are pushing to get that law back on the books. (Gothamist)

The worst commutes of 2018, in book form, dedicated to Governor Cuomo. (Riders Alliance)

The MTA and NYC Transit President Andy Byford are focused on fare evasion, because that is the real problem with our transit. (NY Post)

More bad news for Brooklyn’s Winterfest. They cut back days, limited the hours, hired a new event manager, issued refunds, and all previously paid attractions are free. (Gothamist)

The NYPD discouraged NYC’s Deputy Human Rights Commissioner from reporting a racist encounter on the 1 train. (Gothamist)

New York is the third worst “Judicial Hellhole” in the country, according to The Americans for Tort Reform Foundation. (NY Post)

The Brooklyn Cat Cafe has a new home on Montague Street. One of the city’s few places you can get a fresh cup of coffee and a rescue kitten to go. (Brooklyn Paper)

Bleecker Street, 2018 New York City’s version of Stars Hollow. Things really have changed. (NY Times)

If you’ve run out of date ideas for cuffing season, here’s a list for you. (Thrillist)

The 10 best dishes at Chelsea Market. (Eater)

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The Briefly for November 21, 2018 – The “Frozen Turkey, Travelers, and Parade Watchers” Edition

$150 cocktails on a rooftop bar inside a converted water tower in Williamsburg, everything you need to know for travel or staying local on Thanksgiving, the “MTA Museum” and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A five gallon bucket of a mysterious green liquid spilled on Atlantic Avenue had to be removed by firefighters. No word on turtles study ninjutsu. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Learn more than you care to about your neighbors, including in-depth health history, income, vaccinations and more. (data2gohealth)

Looking back on the 1980 Ramrod Massacre. Once referred to by The New York Times as “barely remembered,” is eerily prescient 38 years later. (GVSHP)

The Barthman sidewalk clock, which recently went missing, is back on the Northeast corner of Maiden and Broadway. (Untapped Cities)

Restaurant jobs in New York increased, despite an increase in the tipped minimum wage. This could open the door to Governor Cuomo eliminating the tipped minimum wage. (Eater)

RIP Maxine, the Bronx Zoo’s 48-year-old elephant. (amNY)

Amazon’s HQ2 construction will likely start in 2020, as the city and state vow to allow public input. What’s the likelihood they’ll enjoy what they hear? (LIC Post)

Anyone up for $150 cocktails on a Williamsburg roof inside a converted water tower? Yup, peak Brooklyn has arrived. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Despite contacting Democrats in Iowa, Amazon Cuomo claims he isn’t running for president in 2020. (NY Post)

The “MTA Museum” pays tribute to all the “art” that surrounds us, like “Untitled, Butt Pattern” and “Chewing Gum on Concrete.” (Gothamist)

Where to eat at JFK Airport. (Eater)

Can the MTA finish repairs on the J/M/Z lines before the L train shuts down? Expect closures and inconveniences through the end of January. (Curbed)

12 restaurants with stunning views. (Eater)

The Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition has chosen this year’s installation titled Happy. The transparent yellow vinyl on an open-frame structure is… interesting. (Time Out)

The man who allegedly defaced the African Burial Ground Monument, Ivan Nieves, was arrested on Tuesday. (NY Times)

Yeshivas and private schools schools could lose state funding if they fail to provide a substantially equivalent education to public schools. A three-year DOE probe showed that at some yeshivas, students were taught basic math and no science, and that was if officials were allowed in at all. Fifteen Brooklyn schools refused to allow their classes to be reviewed.(NY Post)


Traveling on Thanksgiving sucks, but it’s gonna be extra bad this year with freezing temperatures and snow coming in north of the city. (NY Post)

Interested in seeing the balloons being inflated Wednesday night? Here’s all the info you’ll need to satisfy your inner child, and maybe actual children too. (Gothamist)

Here’s where you can still volunteer on Thanksgiving day. (Bklyner)

If you see romaine lettuce in anyone’s hands at your family Thanksgiving, smack that E. coli infested leafy green nightmare out of their hands. Good job, hero. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about getting around on Thanksgiving. (Curbed)

The Heights and Hills Community Council in Brooklyn Heights is looking for pies to be donated to be served at their Thanksgiving Feast for Seniors. (Brooklyn Heights Blog)


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