The Briefly for September 21, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Brooklyn Promenade Might Be Closing, and More

BQE construction could shut down the Brooklyn Promenade for years, Battery Park could get a Hurricane Maria memorial, NYC’s only private island, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Before you go anywhere this weekend, check out the changes to the subway. The 2 and M lines look to be especially bad, the L is running, the G is partially running, and the D train is sometimes an A and sometimes an F.

The Brooklyn Promenade could close for six years in order to accommodate construction on the BQE. During construction, the BQE would be elevated to where the promenade currently sits. The promenade would be rebuilt afterwards. The project will cost over $3 billion.

September 22 (Saturday) is Free Museum Day in New York, you can reserve a pair of tickets at one of over two dozen museums throughout the state.

80 Flatbush was unanimously approved by the City Council after undergoing changes to make the project smaller. The next step for the development is seeking Uniform Land Use Review Procedure approval.

One of the city’s top school districts is removing admissions standards in an attempt to diversify the student body. 55% of middle school age students in the district are black or Latino, but 81% of the students in the schools are white. Mayor de Blasio and School Chancellor Richard Carranza approved the plan, which The New York Times points out was not de Blasio’s idea.

Ten elevated parks and gardens across the city from Untapped Cities.

The cost of housing the city’s homeless population has increased. The city is spending $117 a day to house a single adult this year compared to $99 last year. A lack of permanent solutions is being partially blamed for the increase.

The Archdiocese of New York hired Barbara Jones to review its procedures for dealing with the ongoing crisis of clergy sexual-abuse allegations. Jones just finished up the Michael Cohen case two weeks ago. The archdiocese has already paid out $60 million to victims.

If you’ve got a transit nerd in your life the New York Transit Museum’s 25th annual Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park in October.

The Museum of Natural History is starting work on the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation despite a lawsuit by Community United to Save Theodore Roosevelt Park (CUSTR?) aimed at stopping the construction. The lawsuit states the construction would “cause catastrophic environmental damage to the area, posing a series of life threatening hazards.”

Meet the man who owns the only private island in New York City.

Police chief James O’Neill claims that the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights plans to bail out all 16 and 17-year-olds and bail-eligible women from city jails will make the city less safe.

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Citiva, is opening across the street from the Barclays Center.

Governor Cuomo’s former top aide and confidante, Joseph Percoco, will serve six years in prison for bribery.

Fake doctor sentenced for lethal butt injection.

Noted racist James Harris Jackson fatally stabbed a 66-year-old black man with a sword in Midtown last year and told the police it was “practice” for a larger racial terror attack he planned to carry out in Times Square.

What is going on at The Edna Cohen School in Coney Island? More than a week after the primary election there are no votes reported while the State Assembly primary has a 70 vote margin between the candidates.

Governor Cuomo has proposed a memorial to those lost or made homeless by Hurricane Maria in Battery Park City. The governor also announced an expansion of the New York Stands with Puerto Rico program, which sends student volunteers to work with non-profits rebuilding homes on the island.


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The Briefly for September 18, 2018 – NYC vs DOJ, a Seven Alarm Fire, the U.N. and More

Midtown will slow down even more once the U.N. is in town, the DOJ comments about safe injection sites, de Blasio deflects school bus complaints and more.

What you need to know about the United Nations general assembly that’s starting this week.

The worst days of the year for driving in Manhattan aren’t Christmas or Thanksgiving, it’s when the U.N. is in session. In Midtown, traffic slows from the average of 4.7mph to 3mph and the city’s new message is simple: “Your trip through Midtown will take three times as long.”

The bridge that connects Brooklyn Bridge Park and the Brooklyn Heights is indefinitely closed. It seems that high moisture levels are causing the problem with the bridge. That’s outside. Near the water.

The creepy LinkNYC/ice cream jingle mystery is one step closer to being solved.

A seven alarm fire broke out at Kings Plaza Mall’s parking garage. Avon Stephens, 23, was arrested for causing damage to over 100 Mercedes-Benzes. A local dealership was storing cars there, not everyone who goes to Kings Plaza drives a Benz. No one suffered life-threatening injuries. He said he was sorry.

Rose III by Isa Genzken is a new 26-foot-tall sculpture of a rose in Zuccotti Park.

Cuomo defeated Nixon and Gothamist asks “Are the subways screwed forever?

Joe Crowley will remain chairman of the Queens Democratic Party after being defeated by Amexandria Ocasio-Cortez. He’s remained the chairman since 2006.

A 33-year-old man was found dead at Union Square after attempting to walk between train cars while moving.

Just when you thought it was safe to go back on Instagram, here comes Human’s Best Friend. It’s an Instagram bait installation, but it’s for dogs.

What’s going on with Australian coffee culture in the city?

The man behind the Society for Indecency to Naked Animals, Alan Abel, has earned himself a second obituary in The New York Times 38 years after his first.

The Justice Department is calling NYC’s proposed safe injection sites a “violation of the Controlled Substances Act.” This is coming to a head after a letter from state Assembly member Nicole Malliotakis (R-Staten Island) was sent to the DOJ.

Mayor de Blasio is blaming bus companies for the 82,225 complaints the DOE has already received in the first two weeks of school, but no action has yet been taken by his administration.


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The Briefly for June 27, 2018 – Election Results, Pools Open Today, NIMBY in Brooklyn Heights, and More

The best dog friendly bars, State Senator Marty Golden doesn’t care about parking regulations, TOMS comes to Williamsburg, election results are in, and more in today’s news digest.

World Trade Center One with Pride and American Flags
World Trade Center One

Contested Primary winners:
House District 5: Gregory Meeks (D)
House District 9: Yvette Clarke (D)
House District 11: Max Rose (D) and Dan Donovan (R) – Michael Grimm lost!
House District 12: Carolyn Maloney (D) beat the Tinder catfishing candidate Suraj Patel
House District 14: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D) over incumbent Joseph Crowley

Meet Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the congressional giant-slayer. The big story to come from this primary election will be the low turnout. Confusion, purged voter rolls, and closed polling sites cast a shadow over yesterday’s elections, further disenfranchising people from voting.

Our parks are aging, underfunded and plagued by infrastructure problems according to a 53-page report from The Center for an Urban Future.

The Boerum Hill historic district was expended by the Landmarks Preservation Commission by 300 buildings. A historic district is a designation that is mostly honorific.

Eater has a map of dog-friendly bars so you and your best friend can hang out.

Filming Around Town: Once Upon A Time in Staten Island, starring Naomi Watts,is on Bay Ridge Ave in Brooklyn, The Kitchen, starring Melissa McCarthy, is on 104th and Madiso, Netflix and Marvel’s Jessica Jones is at 74th and 5th, Showtime’s Ray Donovan is at Court Square Station in Queens, The Deuce, starring James Franco, is on Willow Ave and E 135th St in the Bronx.

Today is the last day of hearing over abolishing the tipped minimum wage. Different restaurant lobby groups are on different sides of the debate. Currently the tipped minimum wage is $8.70 and that will rise to $10 by year’s end, which is lower than the $15 full minimum wage for non-tipped workers.

It’s unbelievable that there’s another story about Marty Golden skirting the law when it comes to his car, but here we are. Golden’s Cadillac was parked in a bus stop and after giving a traffic agent his card and a fist bump, he walked away without a ticket, but it was caught on film by a passerby.

Three city council members are calling for the bodega where 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman was stabbed to death to be closed. Ritchie Torres, Vanessa Gibson, and Rafael Salamanca cite the owner’s actions that lead to Lesandro being dragged out of the store as the reason to pull the deli’s license. Over 42k New Yorkers had signed an online petition making the same request.

Trump’s family separation policy is being challenged by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and Attorney General Barbara D. Underwood in New York along with 17 other Attorneys General.

TOMS is opening its first Brooklyn store in Williamsburg. No word on if they will be buying a second store for those in need.

NYPD declined to file charges against a motorist who killed 4-year-old Luz Gonzalez in Bushwick and left the scene. Brooklyn’s District Attorney Eric Gonzalez does not have a strong history when it comes to hit and run killings.

Brooklyn Heights is feeling NIMBY fever. a pedestrian bridge to connect the Brooklyn Heights Promenade and Brooklyn Bridge Park would ruin the “peace and relaxation” and “kill the neighborhood.”

Marco! The city’s pools open for summer today. Polo!


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