The Briefly for April 17, 2019 – The “L Project Will Take Train Service From Suck to Blow” Edition

Amazon passed over Industry City before leaving Long Island City, the best bars in Nolita and Soho, Rosé Mansion returns this summer, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Long before Amazon decided not to build a headquarters in Long Island City, they decided not to build at Industry City. The details came out thanks to a Freedom of Information Law request and shows just how far the developers were willing to go to become Amazon City ahead of their billion dollar rezoning request. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about what’s open and what’s closed on Good Friday, Passover and Easter across the city. (Patch)

Here is the subway map and schedule for the L Project, which starts on April 26 and will take the trains service from suck to blow for the foreseeable future. (Gothamist)

Congratulations to the Bed-Stuy chess team for winning second place in the All-Girls National Chess Championship in Chicago last weekend. (Patch)

Squibb Bridge, the pedestrian bridge connecting Brooklyn Bridge Park and Brooklyn Heights will be demolished and rebuilt after opening in only 2013. The BQE Rehab won’t interfere with the bridge, meaning work can get started faster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If Skynet ever becomes a reality, you can rest assured that the city’s government won’t play a hand in its creation. The mayor’s artificial intelligence task force has met 20 times in the last year and has accomplished, as far as reporting has shown, absolutely nothing but infighting and typical government inefficiencies. Like many of the mayor’s projects, there was no explicitly stated goals or scope to the work they are expected to achieve. (Curbed)

Close your eyes and picture a variety show in Bushwick. Good. Now turn up the saturation and volume past the point of being polite. If you’ve got a wild enough imagination, you’ve pictured something close to Eric Schmalenberger’s Blunderland Variety Show in its seventh year. (Bushwick Daily)

Hold on to your Instagram accounts, Rosé Mansion is returning this summer. (amNY)

In “nowhere is safe” news, the Fifth Avenue Apple Store has had a supposed month-long bed bug infestation. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s revamped plans for a completely new system of bus routes is still coming, but much like a city bus, it’s going to arrive later than you want it to. NYC Transit plans to finalize a plan by April 2020. (QNS)

The Lyrid meteor shower will hit its peak on April 22 and 23 and will happen from the 16th to 25th. Take a look upwards at night, you may see some shooting stars. (Patch)

New Jersey politicians think congestion pricing unfairly targets New Jerseyians. Maybe they’ve forgotten the point of congestion pricing is first and foremost to reduce the number of cars driving into Manhattan. (NY Times)

Buckets Of Xanax, no really we’re talking about literal hundreds of thousands of pills in buckets, were seized in a dark web raid that was using Manhattan businesses as return addresses. (Patch)

SPIN’s new ping pong lounge launches next week. The ping pong is free, but how’s the food? (Time Out)

The mayor, unlike some other politicians, has already released his 2018 taxes. Nothing terribly exciting, but he gets credit for doing it. (Politico)

Jumaane Williams, who is both the city’s public advocate and also captain obvious, said that the Hudson Yards is “not for a majority of this city.” (amNY)

The state’s legislature is pushing forward with a bill that would ban religious exemptions for the measles-vaccine for any child attending schools in New York state. Rockland County’s outbreak has infected 186 and Brooklyn’s has infected 259. The World Health Organization labeled measles as one of the 10 largest threats to global health in 2019. (Downtown Express)

An interview with Dr. Jan Kaminsky, Director of Education at Rainbow Health Consulting, and is also developing a National LGBTQ+ Nurses Association. (Gothamist)

The best bars in Soho and Nolita. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 27, 2019 – The “Paying For The Subways With Legal Marijuana” Edition

Jumaane Williams is the city’s new Public Advocate, Cuomo and de Blasio are working together on the MTA, NY moves to decriminalizing sex work, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio unveiled a 10-point plan for MTA reform. Reorganize the MTA, congestion pricing, fare hike caps, MTA board appointments that end with a mayor or governor’s term, crack down on fare evaders, an audit, a new Regional Transit Committee, the Columbia and Cornell experts will return, expedite Andy Byford’s subway action plan, and the governor and mayor will actually have to work together. That last part is the most unrealistic. (Second Avenue Sagas)

Once marijuana is legal, a portion of the taxes will go towards funding the MTA under the ten-point plan. (NY Post)

Who doesn’t want another boozy Taco Bell in the city? Brooklyn Heights’ community board. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Jumaane Williams is New York City’s new Public Advocate. (NY Times)

Watch Public Advocate Elect Jumaane Williams’ post-election speech. (@JumaaneWilliams)

The NY Islanders are expecting a new $1.18 billion arena for a 2021 opening, but State Senator Leroy Comrie is a member of the Public Authorities Control Board and won’t allow the project to move forward unless concessions are made. We have ourselves a new Amazon-style showdown. (Gothamist)

Therese “Patricia” Okoumou, the woman who climbed the Statue of Liberty last July 4, pulled a similar stunt in Austin, TX. Federal prosecutors asked a judge to revoke her bail. (NY Post)

How much do you need to earn to think about buying a home in NYC? $105,684.33. (Patch)

New York is a baseball state. Soon it may be the law. (amNY)

After $773 million over four years, Mayor de Blasio has pulled the plug on his Renewal turnaround program, which hoped to turn around the city’s 100 lowest performing schools. Unfortunately the new program looks a lot like the old one. (Chalkbeat)

If you love combined sewer overrun, this is the perfect Twitter account for you. (@combinedsewers)

The first eight months of last year, there were 934 schools in the city that had critical health code violations, the kind that would shut a restaurant down. Mice, roaches, flies, mold, and rats. (NY1)

The barnacle Citi Bike likely spent time in the Hudson River, but it’s more fun to believe that the last rider was Aquaman. (Gothamist)

The only good left on the internet is the “Bag Dogs” Instagram account. (Gothamist)

File is under the city’s nightmare file. A man fell down an elevator shaft from the third floor in SoHo and survived. (Gothamist)

Stop feeding the animals in city parks before the City Council makes it illegal. (amNY)

The NYPD still doesn’t know who shot and killed Detective Brian Simonsen in a robbery turned friendly fire in Richmond Hill, Queens. (amNY)

Community Board 3 approved naming the Northeast Corner of 79th Street and 37th Avenue after State Senator Jose Peralta, who died unexpectedly last year. (Jackson Heights Post)

10 historical buildings in Gowanus at risk of demolition. (Untapped Cities)

The city’s compost is potentially worth $22.5 million annually, but we are literally trashing it. (Patch)

State Senators Jessica Ramos and Julia Salazar and Assemblymember Richard Gottfried introduced a series of bills to decriminalize sex work in New York. As Ramos puts it “Ultimately sex work is work.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Where to go after you delete Tinder in frustration. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for December 21, 2018 – The “What A Federal Shutdown Means for New York” Edition

Weekend subway changes, Pilotworks is dead (again), the Nobel Peace Prize winning Santa, the E and M trains get their own mini-shutdown, Christmas in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway changes and construction. (Subway Weekender)

10 must-visit spots in Long Island City. You should probably visit before Bezos moves in. (Untapped Cities)

20 candidates in a 90 minute Q&A session. The Public Advocate election is getting crowded. (Bklyner)

The man who promised to save the dead Brooklyn food incubator Pilotworks has decided to back out of the deal. (Eater)

Here’s what a federal government shutdown would mean for New York City. (Patch)

The city’s Independent Budget Office says the city’s financial situation is “relatively strong,” but admits the city faces “significant uncertainty” around public services like the subway, the NYCHA, and public hospitals. (Metro)

Harvey Weinstein’s request to dismiss his sexual assault charge was denied and the case will go forward. (NY Times)

If you thought the L train shutdown or the BQE replacement was going to be a mess, just wait for the twenty year work on the Grand Central Terminal train shed. The train shed is the size of 20 football fields and runs from 42nd Street to 57th Street. (6sqft)

New York City is Atlas Obscura’s most popular destination of 2018. Duh. (amNY)

The man who portrays Santa in Bryant Park is a Nobel Peace Prize-winner for being a charter member of the American branch of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War. What do you want for Christmas? This Santa already brought us a small slice of world peace. (amNY)

No matter how rough your SantaCon was, it wasn’t as bad as Christopher Visone’s, who just woke up from his medically induced coma. (Gothamist)

Parking Summons Advocate Jean Wesh will finally open his lower Manhattan office today after eight months being on the job. (NY Post)

Say goodbye to the E and M tunnel between Queens and Manhattan. It’s not exactly the L train shutdown, it will be closed from December 26 until December 31 for repairs. (LIC Post)

Calvert Vaux’s fingerprint is all over the city. Learn about the co-designer of Central Park and multiple landmarks across the city. (GVSHP)

So this is Christmas. How are you going to get around the city? (Curbed)

He snuck prostitutes into his apartment in suitcases and other details you didn’t want to know about Eliot Spitzer’s sex life. (NY Post)

L train shutdown be damned. Retail real estate in Williamsburg is the highest among 16 retail corridors in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’d rather do anything than take the train to Dyker Heights on a winter night, you can check out the photos instead. (amNY)

The city is lying when they boast about building 20.9 miles of protected bike lanes in 2018. The real number is 23% less. (Streetsblog)

Congestion pricing will not take effect January 1, thanks to a lawsuit on behalf of the taxi industry, claiming the practice is discriminatory. The ruling by Supreme Court Justice Martin Schulman will delay the start until a full hearing can be scheduled. (NY Post)

A little league baseball field isn’t the ideal location for a four year parking lot for construction vehicles, but that’s what the West Side Little League is looking at. (West Side Rag)

State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself!” Parker is signing up for Thrive NYC’s mental-health courses after his outburst on Twitter. No word on what he’ll do about his car sporting the wrong license plate, a lapsed inspection, and an un-authorized parking placard. (NY Post)

A story of two old friends who met on New Year’s Eve on 1979 while watching the ball drop from their respective taxis, and how their close friendship has changed over the years to provide a support structure against the harshness of an uncaring city. (NY Times)

A look at ABC No Rio’s four story “Passive House” building, set to begin construction next year. (Bowery Boogie)

The 12 best restaurants in Brooklyn Heights. (GrubStreet)

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