The Briefly for May 20, 2019 – The “Casting Literal and Figurative Shade” Edition

A legendary pizza place is temporarily closed, Scott Stringer is making his mayoral candidacy clear, the NYPL’s secrets, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are along the 3, 6, A, D and E lines, but double check before you go anywhere after 10pm. (Subway Weekender)

The BQE Rehab panel is asking for feedback. If you want to provide your feedback, there’s a phone number and a form for the kind of constructive, polite feedback New Yorkers are known for. (BQE Panel)

The developer of the building that would cast literal shade on the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is attempting a char offensive campaign to promote the site’s affordable housing. I’m not sure there’s a New Yorker gullible enough to believe that a company would pay $75 million for a plot of land and then build 1,500 apartments (50% would be “affordable”) because they believe in affordable housing. (Gothamist)

From the pneumatic tubes, to the book train, to the actual visible history you can see in the building, ten secrets of the NYPL’s main branch on 42nd St. (Untapped Cities)

Not on the list is the number of empty floors of stacks. There are some parts of the NYPL that can’t safely store its research collection, which has been moved into storage underneath Bryant Park, where its 11 million book collection is safe. (NY Times)

Wave hello to the city’s newest bars and restaurants. (amNY)

The restaurants ordered closed last week, including surprising inclusions Barcade on 24th and Di Fara Pizza in Midwood. (Patch)

Di Fara says it will be reopening today. (Eater)

If you need more proof that the MTA wasn’t prepared for the L Train Slowdown, the initial cuts to the M14’s route have been altered with this “final compromise.” (Curbed)

35 years after opening, Bookbook in Greenwich Village is closing. It’s not the city’s rising rents, but retirement that’s calling the owners. (NY Times)

This Gothamist piece about a protest from contractors over the proposed rent reforms takes a turn midway through, accusing real estate and landlord groups of astroturfing the hearings. (Gothamist)

630 Fifth Avenue. Quickly, what’s the nearest corner? Take off the last number and you’ve got 63. Divide it by 2 and you have 31. Add 20 because it’s over 600 and the answer is 51st St. Finding a cross street used to involve a little math. (Ephemeral New York)

The city lost 7,500 affordable apartments in 2018, but gained 11,800. There’s a catch. 80% of the new apartments’ affordability status is temporary. (The Real Deal)

Brooklyn’s bra whisperer. (NY City Lens)

The Bronx’s Tibbetts Brook was “moved” underground by Robert Moses. As a result of Robert Moses’s brilliant idea, the surrounding area floods when it rains, the flooding overwhelms the sewers and overflow has to be dumped into the Harlem River. The Parks Department has a plan to bring the brook back above ground to remedy this, but a private rail company stands in their way. (Gothamist)

If you’re unfamiliar with the Combined Sewage Overflow system, the city collects rainwater in its sewer system, and when the combination of rainwater, human waste, and whatever else on the street overload the sewer system, it dumps out in the NYC waters in 13 locations, dumping 377 million gallons of raw sewage into our waters. (Newsweek)

This is why the city closely monitors the water at the city’s beaches for sewage runoff. Beaches were on warning for 49 days in 2018 with one closure. The Swim Guide and website is also available for water condition reports. (nyc.gov and The Brooklyn Eagle)

Notify NYC now offers transit alerts. Why would you want transit alerts from the Department of Emergency Management, a city agency, instead of the MTA, a state agency, or one of the dozens of transit apps? No idea. A quick look shows that the Notify system doesn’t have the same breadth of coverage as @NYCTsubway on twitter. (amNY)

It shouldn’t be to anyone’s surprise at the width of the chasm of difference between the rezoning plans of the Department of City Planning and the Bushwick Community Plan for Bushwick’s future. (Bklyner)

Normal people put up curtains or shades in their bathrooms so people can’t watch them poop. Alex Rodriguez does not appear to be a normal person, or else this photo of A-Rod taking a deuce wouldn’t be on the internet. (Gothamist)

Morgenstern’s is adding a twist to its flagship ice cream location on Houston: booze. (Eater)

The most popular baby names in NYC are Liam, Noah, Jacob, Emma, and Olivia. Not many future kinds named Bran. (Patch)

Turns out the TWA hotel wasn’t actually as ready for visitors like it should have been. (Gothamist)

If you want to attract birds, here are the plants for you to grow. (Patch)

. Turns out the MTA is as good at maintaining its toilets as it is its subways. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard ferry stop opens today. (Brooklyn Paper)

Scott Stringer, who has clearly been making a visibility play to run for mayor, says a new tax on the city’s largest businesses could expand subsidies for childcare for 84,000 kids younger than 3. (Patch)

The best cocktails under $10. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 4, 2019 – The “De Blasio Does His Best Cuomo Impression” Edition

New Yorkers are united in their opposition to the mayor’s presidential hopes, Manhattan’s accidental leaning tower, Chinatown’s “Bloody Angle”, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

12 new art installations to check out in Apriln. (Untapped Cities)

Queens Councilman Eric Ulrich is calling on the mayor to fire the Department of Homeless Services Commissioner Steve Banks in a change.org petition. Ulrich says Banks’ failure to address chronic homelessness is the base reason for the petition. (QNS)

The mayor announced an “expert panel” to fix the mess that is the BQE construction. The panel will be lead by the CEO of a construction trade lobbying group and include people from a Google/Alphabet subsidiary, the Regional Planning Association, NYU, multiple trade and construction groups, and others. The panel is light on urban planning experts and will be tasked with finding an outcome that is “in the best interests of everyone.” (Gothamist)

It seems Rock & Roll is an acceptable art form now, getting its first exhibition at the Met. (Gothamist)

Donald Trump’s first Manhattan real estate project pioneered the tax incentives whose lineage can be traced all the way to the recent imploded Amazon deal. (Curbed)

Yesterday we learned that we’re paying the highest taxes in the country, and now there’s an indication that the city is over-taxing hundreds of small buildings accidentally, in some cases 4x the appropriate rate. (The Real Deal)

Taking a dip in the East River anytime soon? Here’s a field guide to what you might find in the water. (Gothamist)

If you’re interested in working the 2020 Census, there will be a job fair at Queens Borough Hall on May 1. (QNS)

The list of the world’s best hospitals includes three hospitals in the city. (Patch)

A look in photos of what is left of “Italian Williamsburg.” (NY Times)

Here’s a look at the OMNY subway NFC systems in the wild. If the demo iPhones in Apple stores can always be found to have fecal matter on them, imagine how gross these screens are going to get. (Gothamist)

Something is fishy about the city’s purchase of buildings for $173 million when their first estimate valued them at $50 million. Also, the landlords are represented by a lawyer who is helping the mayor raise money to fly around the country pretending anyone wants to see him run for president. (NY Times)

As a reminder, 76% of New Yorkers don’t want the mayor to run for president. Only 42% approve of the job he’s doing in New York. (amNY)

Why does no one want the mayor to run for president? Maybe it’s a moment like this, where he blamed the federal government for all of the city’s problems. (NY Post)

Manhattan has its own leaning tower. A 58-story condo on Maiden Lane is leaning North by three inches as a result of a faulty foundation, according to a lawsuit. Construction is still continuing, despite complaints. (Gothamist)

638 of the city’s bridges are considered “structurally deficient,” which include the Brooklyn Bridge and the Throgs Neck. (Patch)

In the last four years, Uber spent $2 million lobbying in favor of congestion pricing. (NY Post)

A body of a 53-year-old man was discovered in the water near the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into Chinatown’s “Bloody Angle.” How Doyers Street’s gang violence earned it that nickname. (Streeteasy)

A look at The Shed, Hudson Yards’ cultural center which has more configurations than a transformer. (Engadget)

20 tasty Thai restaurants in the city. (Eater)

The city’s comptroller wants the Department of Transportation to take control of the NYC Ferry system from private company Hornblower after learning how astronomically high the city subsidizes each rider’s trip. (Curbed)

After a 10-year fight with the MTA, Luis Colon was awarded $22 million after needing spinal fusion surgery from a fall from a makeshift platform on the Henry Hudson Bridge. (NY Post)

Take a look at this insane plan from the 1940s to build an airport on top of buildings from 24th to 71st Streets. (Viewing NYC)

The best spring break food and drinks. (amNY)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for March 21, 2019 – The “Curious Curse of the Lettered Subway Lines” Edition

A Citi BIke valet, the city’s most popular dog breed, the Museum of Natural History gets an update, the robot Instagram influencer, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city’s most popular dog breed is the french bulldog, according to the AKC, but that only counts registered purebred dogs. (amNY)

Five ways to fix the Brooklyn Bridge’s pedestrian problem. (Streetsblog)

One year later, Cynthia Nixon has no regrets about running for governor. (Time)

When it comes to subway lines, the lettered lines are cursed. (NY Times)

“Hello. You can help everyone have a great trip. Please use headphones at a volume only you can hear.” (Patch)

Starting today you can vote on a new logo for POPS (Privately Owned Public Spaces) across the city. (Curbed)

The 17th-century meeting between Dutch settlers and the Lenape tribe portrayed in a diorama in the American Museum of Natural History hasn’t changed, but the museum has added 10 stickers to the glass to correct inaccuracies. (NY Times)

The list of politicians who support a two-strikes ban for serial sex offenders on the subway is growing and now includes Governor Cuomo. (Gothamist)

An exterminator explains where he’d never want to live in the city. (Science Insider)

Central Park’s spring guide is officially available, giving you flora and fauna knowledge of every corner of the 840 acres. (6sqft)

It seems everyone has an idea of how the BQE in Brooklyn Heights can be changed. The latest design buries the BQE and extends Brooklyn Bridge Park to create a tri-line park and promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The latest subway riding dog you need to see today is the backpacked Mad Maxine, Fluffy Road. (@madmax_fluffyroad)

Are Mayor de Blasio’s rezonings segregating the city? Advocates are calling for a racial impact study before the rezonings move forward. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The first self-driving cars in the city are coming to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. They’ll be doing a loop between the ferry dock and the intersection of Flushing Ave and Cumberland St. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

13 perfect NYC springtime strolls. (Curbed)

How The New York Times decides what to investigate. (NY Times)

The latest Instagram influencer is a bot created to score its creator free meals across the city. We’ve lost the John Henry battle on Instagram. (Chris Buetti)

Real casinos in the city? Wanna bet? (NY Times)

34 former students from Yeshiva University are preparing a class action lawsuit alleging sexual abuse that spanned from the ’60s to the ’90s thanks to the state’s temporary lifting of the statute of limitations. (NY Post)

41% of New Yorkers feel like they can’t afford to live in New York state and think they’ll be forced to move in the next five years. (Patch)

The 2020 census, explained. (amNY)

Advocates are calling for a temporary bike lane to be installed on the Verrazzano Bridge on summer weekends. The bridge is owned by the MTA, so it’s not a city decision. (Gothamist)

If a neighborhood was going to get an official Citi Bike valet, of course, it’s the Upper West Side. (West Side Rag)

Forget the peanuts and Cracker Jack. The Yankees have It’s time to sound off. (Patch)

What makes a “real” New Yorker? The founder of Gothamist has some criteria. (Brooklyn Paper Radio)

A look at “the most demonic store on St Marks:” Search & Destroy. (What Should We Do)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

16 new restaurant openings. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.