The Briefly for November 5, 2019 – The “Another Loss for Trump” Election Day Edition

Everything you need for election day, NYC has a new top cop, a Chicago-style bean is coming to NYC, the best French bistros and brasseries, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Today is election day! (amNewYork)

Look up your nearest polling location.

Here’s what is on today’s ballot. (Patch)

A guide to the 2019 New York elections. (Politico)

Need more information about the charter questions? (Patch)

There will be extra language interpreters at 100 poll sites today, thanks to a lawsuit that the Board of Elections tried and failed to block in court. (Gothamist)

A federal appeals court ruled that President Trump’s accounting firm must turn over his tax returns to New York prosecutors. The next stop for this case is the Supreme Court. (Huff Post)

A look at what the midtown skyline will look like with the addition of the new 707-foot tall 270 Park. (New York YIMBY)

Kiss announced 75 additional tour dates to their End of the Road farewell tour, with their last show in NYC on July 17, 2021. (Brooklyn Vegan)

With the help of the new Wegmans, the Brooklyn Navy Yard hit a record of 589 new hires in a year. This is the first time the Navy Yard surpassed 10,000 jobs in the 53 years the city has been operating it. (amNewYork)

Look, I don’t want to be the asshole that tells you about this for the first time, but it’s possible that we’re gonna see some snow towards the end of this week. (Patch)

Children under the age of two in car seats must be in rear-facing car seats, according to a law that came into effect at the beginning of November. (amNewYork)

Dov Hikind, a former state assemblyperson who advocated in favor of racial profiling by the NYPD, was against same-sex marriage, wore blackface to a 2013 Puris celebration, and was indicted on corruption charges while in office, will be unblocked by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter thanks to the settlement of a lawsuit against AOC. Can’t imagine why she blocked him, he seems like such a swell guy. (NY Times)

An interview with Drag Queen Marti Gould Cummings, candidate for City Council District 7 in 2021. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Say hello to the new First Avenue subway station entrance at Avenue A. (Curbed)

Police Commissioner James O’Neill has resigned. Dermot Shea, the chief of detectives, will be his replacement. (NY Times)

O’Neill’s three-years as commissioner were marred with the 2016 Chelsea bomber, multiple terror attacks, and a sharp rise in NYPD suicides, but he also issued a formal apology for the NYPD’s actions that caused the Stonewall riots and oversaw the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, whose chokehold led to the death of Eric Garner. (amNewYork)

Here’s what’s known about Dermot Shea, the next commissioner. (NY Times)

“At a time when the relationship between police and communities of color couldn’t be worse – we chose yet another white guy?” -Assemblyperson Catalina Cruz, who represents Jackson Heights, Elmhurst, and Corona. (Sunnyside Post)

The Briefly is a celebration of the news that comes from all over the city every day and from over 80 different sources. Sometimes I ignore a story like this, but I love seeing this type of reporting. Rite Aid installed self check out machines at their store in Carroll Gardens. If you know of a hyperlocal blog and you haven’t seen it linked here, please email it to me. (Pardon Me For Asking)

Student suspensions are down by 10.5% in the city’s schools this year. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

There was madness at Popeye’s across the city on Sunday, as their chicken sandwich made its return. (Time Out)

Babe Ruth is known for his time with the Yankees, but a jersey from his season of coaching the Brooklyn Dodgers is up for auction. (Atlas Obscura)

We’re getting our own Chicago-style “bean” at 56 Leonard St. Unlike the Chicago version from the same artist, this one will be wedged into the base of an apartment building. (Time Out)

20 of the best French bistros and brasseries. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 27, 2019 – The “MTA Buses Will Vaporize You Car with Lasers” Weekend Edition

The City Council looks to silence nighttime construction, Juumane Williams leapfrogs the mayor, no one believes in the MTA Capital Plan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check this weekend’s subway disruptions before you head out this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Construction noise keeping you up at night? You’re not alone, and the City Council is looking into limiting construction work because the Department of Buildings’ approvals doesn’t seem to be taking neighborhoods into consideration. As you could imagine, the real estate lobby isn’t thrilled with this using the “it’s necessary for a growing city,” but last I checked the city is contracting, not expanding. (NY Times)

Have you seen the ads showing the MTA’s new bus lane enforcement that seemingly installs a car-destroying laser aboard every bus? (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to deal with 911 calls that deal with emotionally disturbed individuals was supposed to be announced on Wednesday, but the day came and went with no announcement. Public Advocate Jumaane Williams isn’t waiting for the mayor and released his own plan on Thursday. (The City)

The Port Authority will raise tolls, AirTrain ticket prices, and fees for being picked up at the airports by taxis or for-hire vehicles like Ubers or Lyfts. (Curbed)

Tshombe Selby went from usher to performer at the Met Opera for the current production of Porgy and Bess. (amNY)

The city neglected to inspect nearly 10,000 buildings for lead that housed nearly 12,000 children with blood lead levels above the federal standard. Over 2,700 of those cases came after the city was aware of other cases in the same building. An investigation from City Comptroller Scott Stringer revealed a breakdown in the city’s bureaucracy that allowed these conditions to exist and for landlords to get away with these violations. (amNY)

The 25 essential places to drink wine in NYC. (Eater)

A look at Inwood, what the Times calls “Manhattan’s last affordable neighborhood,” which will last as long as people like the Times doesn’t write about it being affordable. (NY Times)

The mystery of the 8’x7′ oil painting hanging in Cortland Alley has been solved, its artist is Diana Wege and the painting is a part of her Earth Requiem series. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city’s Commission on Human Rights released new legal guidance which offers some of the strongest protections against discrimination based on immigration status and national origin in housing, the workplace, and in places like stores, restaurants, schools, and gyms. Telling someone to “speak English” or “go back to your country” in any of these settings would violate the guidance and comes with a fine for up to $250,000. (Patch)

The city’s most exciting new burgers. (Grub Street)

Photos: Inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard, one month before its chapter as Brooklyn’s next destination. (Curbed)

The Nets unveiled a new court to play on, “inspired by Brooklyn.” (6sqft)

The MTA Capital Plan was approved by the MTA’s board unanimously, but no one seems confident that the plan that was voted on is the plan that will be enacted. (Gothamist)

Evon Stephens was sentenced to five years in prison for starting the 2018 fire in the Kings Plaza Shopping Center garage that injured 25 and damaged 135 vehicles. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A Wagner College professor on Staten Island told one of his classes that he wanted to shoot the students in another one of his classes in the head and he was “locked and loaded.” He’s also suspended and under investigation. (Gothamist)

The Queensboro Bridge bike lane and pedestrian situation is more evidence the mayor’s Vision Zero plans don’t have teeth. (Streetsblog)

This story of a feud between two neighbors that has it all. Mannequins, spy cameras, defamation, and a ten million dollar lawsuit. (Gothamist)

Milkshake squirrel, Lollipop Raccoon, etc. A ranking of all of the “move over, Pizza Rat” stories. (Gothamist)

One of the hardest questions to answer. “Where should you go to eat in New York?” The Times attempts to tackle it. (NY Times)

A new damning report from the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General shows the Metropolitan Detention Center’s heat outage last winter in the coldest week of the year was caused by mismanagement and not fire and lists out all of the ways different ways issues were failed to be addressed. (Gothamist)

The world’s oldest barber, Anthony Mancinelli, is dead at 108. (NY Times)

Dr. Glenn Payne, a fake neuropsychologist, swindled at least $30,000 out of patients. Dr. Payne was the best he could come up with? (Gothamist)

15 best dumpling spots in the city. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for August 7, 2019 – The “A Bizzaro World Financial District” Edition

Gun violence in the city is up, the 14th St busway can move forward, James O’Neill says the decision about firing Daniel Panteleo is difficult, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Tiffany Cabán conceded to Melinda Katz in the Queens DA primary. (amNY)

National Grid is denying new service for restaurants in the city who need natural gas until the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation approves a natural gas pipeline that was rejected over water quality concerns in May. (Bedford + Bowery)

If you read the quotes about the Financial District in this Times article about the “Village-like quality” to it, Next Wednesday’s news will be saturated with child sex abuse lawsuits. Under the Child Victims Act, adult victims of child sex abuse will have one year to file lawsuits as the age to file changes from 21 to 55 moving forward. Catholic dioceses, the Boy Scouts, hospitals, and schools are all expected to be on the receiving end of hundreds of lawsuits. (Gothamist)

A woman in Queens’ complaints about her state trooper neighbor’s air conditioner resulted in her being arrested twice and strip-searched, according to a lawsuit against the neighbor, 14 members of the NYPD, and the city. (Patch)

When Bill de Blasio’s daughter moved to Gracie Mansion from an apartment in Brooklyn, she had help from her personal NYPD security detail. According to Citizens Union, having police detectives assist in this would be a violation of the city’s Conflicts of Interest Law. Another violation to add to the growing pile. (NY Times)

Portions of the old Kosciuszko Bridge are being used to form an artificial reef off Fire Island as part of the state’s artificial reef program. Also buried at sea was pieces of the Staten Island Expressway. (Untapped Cities)

Barneys filed for bankruptcy and will close 15 of its 22 stores, but its Madison Ave store will remain open. (NY Times)

It was the focus of a 30 Rock Episode (“Sun Tea” S04E06) and countless other sitcoms. Is it okay to combine two apartments? (StreetEasy)

An NYPD sergeant filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two fellow officers, claiming he was told to “go back to where you belong” and that they prevented his career from advancing due to his age and nation of origin. (Gothamist)

On August 8, Burger Kings across the city (and country) will make the Impossible Whopper available for purchase. Where else you can find the Impossible Burger in the city. (Grub Street)

An NYPD judge recommend he be fired, there have been protests for five years calling for his firing, the speaker of the city council has called for his firing, the governor says he should be fired, you can add Elizabeth Warren’s name to the list too, but NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill calls his decision about the cop who used a banned chokehold against Eric Garner that resulted in Garner’s death a “difficult decision.” (Politico)

Special education should be taken from the Department of Education and moved into the oversight of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, according to Bronx City Councilmember Andy King. The resolution follows 7,500 due process complaints against the DOE and a lawsuit against the DOE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The restraining order against the 14th St busway has been lifted and the city will move forward with its 18-month pilot program on August 12. (Gothamist)

City Councilmember Costa Constantinides is calling for the MTA’s pilot program of installing netting under aging and elevated trains in Queens to be expanded to the entire elevated stretch of the N and W lines. There have been multiple reports of falling debris and construction ephemera, including the car that was impaled on Roosevelt Ave by a wooden beam. (Curbed)

Murder, rape, robbery, burglary, felony assault, grand larceny, and auto theft are down 4% across the city this year, but gun violence is up over 5%. (Patch)

De Blasio scored an impressive 6%, but not in voters who would prefer him as a presidential candidate. 6% of people say he was the worst performer during the Democratic presidential debates. His support is still below 1%. (Politico)

Self-driving cars at the Brooklyn Navy Yard launched, but not without a minor mistake. One of the vehicles reversed into another car. The kicker? It was being driven and was not in self-driving mode at the time. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

NYPD school safety officer Edward Peterson was arrested for allegedly forcing a teenager to perform oral sex on him back in 2013. (Bklyner)

Contact with the NYPD may be bad for your health. Poor physical and mental health, hypertension and binge drinking are all more prevalent among people who have been abused by police, put behind bars or on probation or parole than those who have not, according to a report by the city’s Department of Health. (Patch)

The Metropolitan Opera and Conductor James Levine settled their lawsuit over Levine’s firing after multiple allegations were made of sexual misconduct. The settlement was out of court, so no details are known. (NY Times)

Do you have an idea of how to improve the city’s waterfront? Bring your ideas to a Waterfront Planning Camp on Governor’s Island on August 17 from noon to 4. (amNY)

A guide to surviving the summer in Williamsburg. (6sqft)