The Briefly for February 26, 2019 – The “Trial of Socialite Grifter is the New Trial of El Chapo” Edition

Inside a multi-million dollar Airbnb scam, the Public Advocate election, Eater’s massive guide to NYC Chinese food, the mystery of the barnacle Citi Bike, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s the last guide to today’s election that you’ll see in The Briefly. (Patch)

Polling places opened at 6am and will be open until 9pm. Find your polling location.

Double check to see if you are registered if you have any doubts.

The Board of Education’s attempts to keep translators out of polling locations has failed. A state judge rejected the lawsuit and the city will add Russian, Yiddish, Haitian Creole, and Polish translators to 48 locations in addition to Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, and Bangala. (Patch)

El Chapo’s trial is over just in time for the city to get ready for the trial of the socialite grifter Anna Delvey. (NY Post)

‘“We’re not criminals,” he said at his lawyer’s office, while puffing from a Juul he kept in a black leather pouch fastened to a chain around his neck. He shrugged: “I don’t own a yacht or a big penthouse.”’ Inside a $20 million Airbnb scam across 130 apartments in the city which housed nearly 76,000 guests using 100 host accounts and 18 corporations in order to obfuscate the con. (NY Times)

A map of the city’s farmers’ markets, CSAs, food boxes, and fresh pantries. (City Council)

Have you witnessed the subways “dramatic” improvement in service? I guess it depends if you consider 76.6% a good grade. (Curbed)

A cab driver who fatally hit a young woman and drove away on Sunday was released from police custody without being charged. No reason for the lack of charges was given. (NY Post)

Rockaway Beach is literally disappearing. (CBS New York)

The MTA announced four public meetings to go over the new L train non-shutdown repairs. (6sqft)

A new coalition of people in the sex trades wants New York to become the first state to fully decriminalize sex work. (The Appeal)

The city’s newest and greatest mystery is the Citi Bike covered in barnacles. (Gothamist)

Say goodbye to MetroCards, say hello to OMNY. It stands for One Metro New York and is the future of paying for your crappy subway and bus service. (BrooklynVegan)

The city will be hit with a Bernie Bro-nado this weekend as Bernie Sanders will stage his first 2020 campaign rally at Brooklyn College. (amNY)

This is what an escalator looks like when it malfunctions and it is terrifying. (amNY)

Will the Brooklyn Promenade’s potential highway replacement bring back an old idea of a cross-Brooklyn underground highway? Is Brooklyn ready for its own version of Boston’s The Big Dig? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Today is the 26 year anniversary of the 1993 World Trade Center bombings. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo signed the “Red Flag” gun control bill into law. The law prohibits anyone showing signs they are a threat to themselves or others from buying or possessing any type of firearm. New York is the first state that authorizes teachers, family members, and school administrators to fight school shootings by seeking preemptive action. (Politico)

The latest school to find itself in hot water after students were caught on video being presidential-level homophobic, misogynistic, and racist is Ethical Culture Fieldston School in the Bronx. (NY Post)

Lola Jean will be trying to set “The World Squirting Record” tonight as part of a kinky carnival. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

Timothy Glover, hero, was charged with criminal mischief in the second-degree for beheading Diddy’s statue at Madame Tussaud’s. (NY Post)

The City Council is readying a pied-à-terre tax on non-primary residence apartments purchased for over $5 million. (amNY)

It’s a sprint for the city to finish the necessary work on 5,800 NYCHA apartments that need to have lead-contaminated paint issues resolved before the end of the month to comply with a federally imposed deadline. (NY Post)

Eater has published its massive and exhaustive guide to Chinese food in NYC. (Eater)

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The Briefly for December 4, 2018 – The “Legalize Weed to Save the Subways” Edition

City Hall is in chaos over Mayor de Blasio’s botched firing, parents are calling the DOE’s desegregation plans racist, the 7 train’s new signals aren’t helping, and other uplifting stories in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Bill de Blasio, absentee mayor. (NY Times)

Are you ready for NYPD tactical drones? (NY Post)

The 10 worst dishes of the year, including one sandwich from Arby’s, from Eater’s senior critic Robert Sietsema.

Could legal weed save our subways? (NY Times)

12 new public art installations to pair with a hot drink of your choosing. (Untapped Cities)

Santacon is this Saturday, starting at 10am. In a defensive move, the LIRR, Metro North, and NJ Transit have all banned alcohol consumption. If you need to be on a train that day, may the odds be ever in your favor. (Gothamist)

With Santacon descending onto the unwilling city this Saturday, here are a list of the bars to avoid. (Time Out)

Board of Elections Executive Director Michael Ryan enjoyed nine undisclosed trips paid for by Election Systems and Software, makers of the ballot scanning machines that plagued the city on Election Day. He never received the necessary waiver from the city’s Conflicts of Interest Board to sit on the conpany’s board of advisors. (Gothamist)

George R.R. Martin: pizza critic? (Gothamist)

The 10 biggest real estate projects coming to NYC. (The Real Deal)

The Staten Island NYPD officers Kyle Erickson and Elmer Pastran, accused of planting pot in a black teenager’s car, have, surprise surprise, a history of accusations of racial profiling. (Gothamist)

The Apollo Theater is expanding for the first time since 1934. The foundation that oversees the Apollo will take over the Victoria and open 99 and 199 seat performance spaces and should open in 2020. (NY Times)

“The richest man in America, who’s a direct competitor, has just been handed $3 billion in subsidies. I’m not asking for money or a tax rebate. Just leave me alone.” -Strand owner Nancy Bass Wyden (6sqft)

Thanks to a new legislation, Uber and Lyft drivers will be paid at least minimum wage. (NY Post)

Upset about the Amazon Long Island City deal? You could install the “Black Amazon for Me” Chrome extension, but we all know you won’t. (amNY)

The 7 trains brand new signals, installed late and over budget, weren’t installed optimally. At this point, is anyone surprised that the MTA spent too much money and took too much time to poorly install signals that haven’t helped? (amNY)

Squibb Bridge was installed in 2013 to connect the Brooklyn Promenade to Brooklyn Nridge Park, but the last five years have been full of closures, structural problems, and a lawsuit. The bridge is going to be replaced by 2020. (Curbed)

As we’re hitting the home stretch of 2018, we could be looking at a new record low number of homicides. Despite the downward trend, rape complaints continue to increase, following a two year trend. (amNY)

Parents are calling the DOE’s desegregation plan racist, which shows just how complicated this situation is. (NY Post)

What the hell is going on in City Hall and why can’t the mayor get his administration under control? (NY Post)

Everything to know about the restaurants in the Hudson Yards. (Thrillist)

The first map of Central Park for people with disabilities or otherwise “limited mobility” is now available. (West Side Rag)

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The Briefly for September 21, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Brooklyn Promenade Might Be Closing, and More

BQE construction could shut down the Brooklyn Promenade for years, Battery Park could get a Hurricane Maria memorial, NYC’s only private island, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Before you go anywhere this weekend, check out the changes to the subway. The 2 and M lines look to be especially bad, the L is running, the G is partially running, and the D train is sometimes an A and sometimes an F.

The Brooklyn Promenade could close for six years in order to accommodate construction on the BQE. During construction, the BQE would be elevated to where the promenade currently sits. The promenade would be rebuilt afterwards. The project will cost over $3 billion.

September 22 (Saturday) is Free Museum Day in New York, you can reserve a pair of tickets at one of over two dozen museums throughout the state.

80 Flatbush was unanimously approved by the City Council after undergoing changes to make the project smaller. The next step for the development is seeking Uniform Land Use Review Procedure approval.

One of the city’s top school districts is removing admissions standards in an attempt to diversify the student body. 55% of middle school age students in the district are black or Latino, but 81% of the students in the schools are white. Mayor de Blasio and School Chancellor Richard Carranza approved the plan, which The New York Times points out was not de Blasio’s idea.

Ten elevated parks and gardens across the city from Untapped Cities.

The cost of housing the city’s homeless population has increased. The city is spending $117 a day to house a single adult this year compared to $99 last year. A lack of permanent solutions is being partially blamed for the increase.

The Archdiocese of New York hired Barbara Jones to review its procedures for dealing with the ongoing crisis of clergy sexual-abuse allegations. Jones just finished up the Michael Cohen case two weeks ago. The archdiocese has already paid out $60 million to victims.

If you’ve got a transit nerd in your life the New York Transit Museum’s 25th annual Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park in October.

The Museum of Natural History is starting work on the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation despite a lawsuit by Community United to Save Theodore Roosevelt Park (CUSTR?) aimed at stopping the construction. The lawsuit states the construction would “cause catastrophic environmental damage to the area, posing a series of life threatening hazards.”

Meet the man who owns the only private island in New York City.

Police chief James O’Neill claims that the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights plans to bail out all 16 and 17-year-olds and bail-eligible women from city jails will make the city less safe.

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Citiva, is opening across the street from the Barclays Center.

Governor Cuomo’s former top aide and confidante, Joseph Percoco, will serve six years in prison for bribery.

Fake doctor sentenced for lethal butt injection.

Noted racist James Harris Jackson fatally stabbed a 66-year-old black man with a sword in Midtown last year and told the police it was “practice” for a larger racial terror attack he planned to carry out in Times Square.

What is going on at The Edna Cohen School in Coney Island? More than a week after the primary election there are no votes reported while the State Assembly primary has a 70 vote margin between the candidates.

Governor Cuomo has proposed a memorial to those lost or made homeless by Hurricane Maria in Battery Park City. The governor also announced an expansion of the New York Stands with Puerto Rico program, which sends student volunteers to work with non-profits rebuilding homes on the island.


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