The Briefly for October 28, 2019 – The “NYC’s Ten Most Affordable Neighborhoods” Edition

The late-night subway disruptions, Wegmans’ opening day, the subway bandit is back, the JMZ elevated track is falling apart, top-notch Brazilian and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruptions are pretty rough, hitting the 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, A, D, E, J, and L trains. (Subway Weekender)

Reports from the first day of early voting. (Politico)

Here’s your info on early voting locations and this year’s ballot questions.

Keith Haring’s ‘Crack is Wack’ mural is back. (6sqft)

The ten most affordable neighborhoods in NYC. (Curbed)

Today is the day when the City Council will vote on disciplining Andy King for violating the anti-harassment policy, using city funds to plan a retreat timed to his daughter’s vacation, and firing staff members he thought were cooperating with the investigation into his activities. (NY Times)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 NYC marathon. (Curbed)

Time to pay your overdue library fees to the Brooklyn Public Library, they’re nearly a quarter billion dollars behind on their funding. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York is the third-worst rat-infested city in the nation according to Orkin. (Patch)

Here’s something different. A piece of an elevated subway track smashed through a car and it wasn’t the 7 train. This time around it was the J/M/Z near Myrtle Ave and Broadway. (Gothamist)

Just in case you thought the “Watchtower Sign Becomes A Welcome Sign” story was over, you’re wrong. Whoever takes over the lease can replace the sign to say whatever they want. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Where to go when you don’t want to make a big deal about your anniversary. (The Infatuation)

The one-star reviews are pouring in for the Downtime Bar, which allowed Harvey Weinstein through its doors and kicked out the women who confronted him instead of Weinstein. (Yelp)

The Department of Environmental Conservation gave the go-ahead to turn 18 acres of wetlands in Staten Island to a BJ’s. (Gothamist)

The latest city food trend is Cantonese rice noodle rolls. (Eater)

The subway brake bandit Isaiah Thompson is back, with his latest crime being pushing a woman down onto the subway platform. He was arrested shortly afterward. (Gothamist)

If your Halloween BINGO card had “black children being portrayed hanging with nooses in a window in Clinton Hill,” it’s time to see if you have BINGO. (NY Times)

One day we will have to reckon with the traffic apocalypse that Amazon’s one-day delivery will rain down upon us. (NY Times)

Sunday’s rain did not deter the Wegmaniacs from showing up in droves. (NY Times)

Where to go for top-notch Brazilian food in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 19, 2019 – The “Daniel Pantaleo Lied About The Chokehold” Edition

The MTA’s board is as functional as their trains, the rice cooker guy is caught, Nutcracker summer, finding hidden parks and gardens, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subway work is relatively light this week, but still inconvenient if you’re on the 2, 3, 7, A, E, N or Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

Registration for the 2019 Daffodil Project is available. The Daffodil Project was created post-9/11 to create a living memorial to September 11 city-wide by giving out half a million bulbs a year to be planted in public spaces. (New Yorkers for Parks)

It’s been 14 years since the renovations at the Rugby branch of the Brooklyn Public Library started and we’re still a year away from seeing it completed. (The City)

Jose Alzorriz is the 19th cyclist to be killed by a driver on the city’s streets this year. A petition with over 1,000 signatures is calling for a traffic safety study of Coney Island Avenue following his death. (amNY)

Judge Rosemarie Maldonado’s ruling of Daniel Pantaleo’s involvement in the death of Eric Garner is that he was “untruthful” when he said he didn’t use a chokehold and its use was “a gross deviation from the standard of conduct established for a New York City police officer.” So what now? The city waits for commissioner James O’Neill to hopefully fire Pantaleo. (NY Times)

CitiBike is celebrating the one year anniversary of its Reduced Fare Bike Share program with a free month of membership to NYCHA residents and SNAP recipients starting today. (amNY)

In order to accommodate longer buses, the MTA is cutting nine stops from the B38 bus line, which services from Ridgewood in Queens to Downtown Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Paper)

The history and tradition of opening fire hydrants to cool off. (NY Times)

Two things of note: There is a Coca-Cola Freestyle competition and Queen’s Danuta Rybak is one of the five finalists. (QNS)

17 lighthouses to check out before the summer is over. (Untapped Cities)

This weekend is a “Clear the Shelters” weekend, where the ASPCA will be waiving adoption fees for cats and dogs on Saturday. It’s time to get that cat or dog you’ve been thinking about. (Gothamist)

The six best neighborhoods in Brooklyn for a budget. (StreetEasy)

Sixth Ave in Chelsea is deadly for pedestrians and cyclists. A pedestrian, hit by a driver last week, died of her injuries. Over 130 people have died on city streets this year, up from 108 at this time last year. (Streetsblog)

This week’s list of restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. (Patch)

The MTA is removing bus schedules from its bus stops in an attempt to save money. Replacing them is a sign to call 511 or download the MTA’s app. Sixteen politicians from Queens are pushing back, pointing out that access to a cell phone isn’t always a guarantee and the $550,000 saved on bus schedules seems like a drop in the bucket compared to the $42 billion deficit expected by 2022. (amNY)

If you love seeing rats, Brooklyn is your borough. (Bushwick Daily)

Could Tiffany Cabán’s big to win the Democratic nomination for Queens DA have ended with her nomination without the NY Working Families Party? (The Indypendent)

If you missed the Perseid meteor shower, Scott Segler made a time-lapse. (Viewing NYC)

The Brooklyn War Memorial (and nearby bathrooms) will be undergoing renovations starting in November. The monument has been closed for 27 years. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Blue Point Brewing Co is opening a literal underground brewpub. Granted they’ll only have a two-barrel system, but it’s an A for effort. The Hull is expected to open in October. (amNY)

11 people in the city have been hospitalized and treated for “severe lung trauma” after vaping with products THC and nicotine. This isn’t exclusive to New York, similar illnesses have been reported nationwide. (Gothamist)

We may not have jetpacks, but liquid nitrogen, hydraulic presses, and centrifuges are all being used to make cocktails. (Viewing NYC)

A vegan guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The cast of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is raising funds for the homeless youth of the city through Covenant House with a “sleep out” tonight. It’s not about simulating the experience, though Rachel Brosnahan and some cast-mates will be sleeping on 34th St, but raising funds and awareness. Donations can be made at sleepout.org. (amNY)

The MTA’s board is about as functional as the MTA’s trains and buses, as a recent meeting devolved into a shouting match between two members. (amNY)

You can tell your uncle to stop posting on Facebook about Jeffrey Epstein’s death because it was determined to be suicide by the city’s medical examiner. A look at the last days of Jeffrey Epstein. (NY Times)

Video: Watch the boring machine break through the end of the Delaware Aqueduct tunnel repair as the Department of Environmental Protection closes in on a $1 billion repair project. (Gothamist)

A look at Dexter Park, a 20,000 baseball stadium in Woodhaven which was home to the Bushwicks, a semi-pro baseball team part of the Inter-city Baseball Association. (QNS)

The man in the video circulated by the NYPD in connection to the bomb-scare rice cookers left around Manhattan on Friday, 25-year-old Larry K. Griffin II, was taken into custody on Saturday. (NY Times)

Seven Republicans are rushing to lose an election to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Politico)

A map of the city’s hidden parks and secret gardens. (Curbed)

This summer is the Hot Girl Summer, but every summer in New York City is Nutcracker Summer. (NY Times)

The Briefly for July 22, 2019 – The “A Neighborhood Watch to Protect Against the Government” Edition

Another heatwave and another weekend of failures from ConEd, Friday’s subway glitch, good places for martinis, how to get a bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subways are looking pretty bleak this week. The 2 and 3 are borked, the 7 isn’t running in Manhattan, the L isn’t servicing most of Brooklyn, and the rest isn’t great either. (Subway Weekender)

Friday’s subway “glitch” that suspended the shuttle and every numbered train except the 7 was caused by a problem that was previously flagged and has been causing hundreds of delays since June. The MTA lost the ability to see where the trains were in their system and shut down every affected line. (amNY)

Photos of New Yorkers who dared face and possibly beat the heat. (NY Times)

Inside the neighborhood watch against ICE in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd was ready to provide “safe and reliable service through the weekend.” (amNY)

After a weekend of punishing weather, it looks like we’re headed towards highs in the 80s this week. Perfect weather for John Trivialta at Parklife this Wednesday! (amNY)

ConEd’s took a dump this weekend, with multiple outages across the city due to the heat. (NY Times)

This was before ConEd cut power to 30,000 in Brooklyn in order to make heat-related repairs. In an attempt to assist ConEd, Governor Cuomo sent state troopers, generators and light towers to the affected neighborhoods. The governor is also widening the investigation into last weekend’s power outage to include this weekend’s outages as well. (amNY)

A Times reporter decided to start delivering burritos for a story and, get this, he found out that it’s a demanding job! (NY Times)

Back in March Anthony Comello shot “Franky Boy” Cali in Staten Island. In court, his lawyer says he was trying to help the president by arresting him for being part of the “deep state.” (NY Times)

Video: Meet Andrew Cote, president of the New York Beekeepers Association. (Viewing NYC)

New York hasn’t changed much over the years, and this aerial photo from 1931 shows it. (r/newyorkcity)

Landlord Zev Pollak is being sued for telling African-Americans that he maintains a “Jewish building” in Midwood. According to the lawsuit, Zev Pollak’s “blatant and repeated conduct in violation of this fundamental American principle of equality is shocking and must end.” (The Real Deal)

The newest cheap-snack-turned-expensive-appetizer craze in the city is the french onion dip. (Eater)

Is Whole Foods overcharging for weight differences in their pre-packaged foods? According to a judge, the answer is no. (Gothamist)

Where did all that water come from that flooded a subway station in Queens on Wednesday of last week? Blame the Skyline Tower construction site. (6sqft)

Russian Doll was nominated for 13 Emmy awards, and in celebration of the nominations and the coming second season, take a look at some of the filming locations of the first season. (Untapped Cities)

You never know what you’ll find at a house clearance sale. Archivists found CDs with 2,400 photos of the aftermath of 9/11, taken by what is assumed to be a construction worker. The photographer hasn’t been identified, but all the photos have been uploaded to Flickr. If you are sensitive to photos from 9/11, avoid this link. (BBC)

International Lou Reed Tai Chi Day is being celebrated at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch on August 3. This isn’t a random choice, Lou Reed practiced Tai Chi for over three decades. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Lyft added subway directions to its app in an arms race with Uber to be the one transit app to rule them all. (Engadget)

End the “what’s a drive-in?” conversations with a trip to “Drive-In Movies at the Mount,” a pop-up drive-in in Staten Island on Friday nights. The fare is more family-friendly than horror, terror, and monsters. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you forget that the city is full of animals, other times you see a hawk in McCarren park eating a rodent. (Greenpointers)

Did you take a dip in a city fountain this weekend? It’s not illegal! At one point, the fountain in Washington Square Park was a pool.

DEA agents uncovered a heroin mill in the Bronx with over $5 million of heroin seized. Three people were arrested. (Patch)

Drinking gin and going down a slide. Carefully. (Time Out)

Want to learn more about the city’s history? Here are some great book picks from reporters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s how to get a bike lane in your neighborhood. (Gothamist)

A February fire in the Metropolitan Detention Center caused a blackout during one of the coldest points of the year. This weekend, another fire caused panic inside the federal jail. (Gothamist)

When the Barclays Center was conceived, the developers promised 400 indoor parking spaces for bikes. A decade later that promise is officially broken. (Streetsblog)

227 Duffield Street in Downtown Brooklyn is an unassuming structure, but there are hints that it was once a part of the Underground Railroad, but no concrete proof. Politicians and advocates are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the location as a landmark as a way around a demolition permit granted by the city. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want a good martini. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to @munnybuns for today’s photo!

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