The Briefly for October 18, 2019 – The “What Makes A Beehive A Hipster Beehive?” Weekend Edition

The Rikers replacement plan gets a City Council vote, the weekend’s subway disruptions, ridership on the M14 is up, thrilling breakfast sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Looking to go anywhere on the trains this weekend? Better check the planned subway disruptions before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

The City Council voted to close Rikers Island and the plan to replace it with neighborhood jails in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx is moving forward. (NY Times)

A look back at the Hall of Gems heist at the Museum of Natural History in 1964. (NY Times)

Deep inside the Woolworth Building is a swimming pool that was recently restored in all its stunning glory. (Untapped Cities)

Everyone in the city has enough to worry about before we start with “hipster” beehives. (Gothamist)

The MTA has turned Jay Street-MetroTech into an accessibility “laboratory” with a mix of infrastructure and apps in an attempt to make the station accessible to riders of all abilities. (Curbed)

The Department of Buildings released a new interactive map that tracks after-hours construction permits throughout the city. While it won’t stop the incessant noise, it will help to identify where it’s coming from. (6sqft)

Time Out’s list of the 100 best restaurants in the city has been updated. (Time Out)

The newly-expanded Museum of Modern Art is open, here’s what you need to know. (NY Times)

Brownsville resident Kyle Williams was arrested and charged with murder for the Old Timers Day Festival shooting at the end of July. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you absolutely must dance like an incel on the steps seen in the Joker movie, they’re on W 167th St between Shakespeare and Anderson Aves. (Time Out)

The governors of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania are working together to create standards for vaping safety regulations. (Politico)

The WNBA’s New York York Liberty will return to the city to play games at the Barclays Center after being outcast to Westchester in 2018. If only the Dolan family would sell the Knicks next. (Gothamist)

WNYC is going to end the show New Sounds, hosted by John Schaefer since its debut in 1982 as part of its shift away from music programming. (Gothamist)

A Mrs. Doubtfire musical is coming to Broadway. (Time Out)

The Brooklyn Marathon is Saturday, so get ready for street closures. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Turns out if you make the buses reliable, people want to ride them. Ridership along the M14 bus on 14th St is up since 14th St was cleared of cars. (The Villager)

An NYPD officer fatally shot a man during a traffic stop in the Bronx on Thursday, the second deadly shooting by the NYPD this week and the third time in three days that an officer fired at a suspect. (NY Times)

50-a is a controversial law that shields police personnel records from the public and the state is debating repealing the law. The Police Benevolent Association wants to look like it supports reform but is completely against the idea. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s 86th St has another name: the Pizza Trail. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 12 most thrilling new breakfast sandwiches. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for September 3, 2019 – The “Paying to Sleep in a Van in the East Village” Edition

Cuomo calls for a National Grid alternative, a giraffe corpse found in the water, the Boerum Hill chicken massacre mystery, fall foliage, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Brooklyn Detention Complex will close by the end of the year and its inmates will be transferred to Rikers Island. This is the jail that had a fire in the winter that robbed it of heat for days on end and struggled with the heat during the hottest days of summer. Mayor de Blasio’s community jail plan is set for a vote in city council this month. (The City)

Three illegal Airbnb landlords agreed to a $1 million settlement after making $21.4 million from illegal rentals. Seems like a good deal to me. (Patch)

$85 a night on Airbnb to sleep in a van in the East Village. (Airbnb)

Everyone’s talking about the end of summer, and even though it doesn’t end for three more weeks, here’s a map of when to see peak fall foliage in the city. (Patch)

Meet the Houdini Museum of New York’s 23-year-old director. (amNY)

The top 10 secrets of Madison Square Garden, although “they dress up the backstage area for artists” doesn’t seem like much of a secret. (Untapped Cities)

The restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including 3 restaurants ordered closed after 100+ point violations. (Patch)

The boiler room of the Chelsea Market is now an art space, with ARTECHOUSE taking over the space. The first show is Machine Hallucinations from digital artist Refik Anadol. (Untapped Cities)

The state finished the Kosciuszko Bridge early and the city’s Department of Transportation was caught with their pants down and the bike paths to the bridge weren’t ready. (Curbed)

Did you see the mystery Boerum Hill chicken massacre aftermath video? (Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill has no plans to step down in light of the Police Benevolent Association’s vote of no confidence. (amNY)

If you’re thinking about a new look for the fall, you’re in luck because Cheetos and Forever21 are giving out free Flamin’ Haute Cheeto makeovers on Friday and Saturday. (Time Out)

NYC Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes will open next week. (amNY)

Just in time, they can investigate who vandalized the Silver Gull in Queens with anti-semitic, pro-Nazi, and racist graffiti. (NY Times)

National Grid has been refusing to serve new businesses as a tactic to get their gas pipeline approved by the state and the governor isn’t having it, making public statements that the Department of Public Service should consider alternative franchisees. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD’s leadership is very white. (The City)

This weekend was a particularly violent one when it came to shootings. The NYPD shot and killed a man in Jamaica, Queens who was the suspect in a bodega shooting. (Gothamist)

A shootout with the NYPD in Brownsville, Brooklyn has left a man dead. (amNY)

A shooting in Richmond Hill, Queens left one dead and two seriously injured. (QNS)

Smithsonian Museum Day is coming up on September 21, which means free admission to 30 of the city’s museums if you register in advance. (Time Out)

The Paris Theater, the city’s last single-screen movie theater, is closed. As John Waters comments in this Times piece Where will old art movie fans go to see rarified foreign films in the safety of a rich neighborhood?” (NY Times)

Cars were removed from Central Park last June but traffic signals and lines painted on the streets haven’t been changed, causing chaos and creating a wild atmosphere for pedestrians and cyclists alike. (Streetsblog)

Photos from the Electric Zoo on Randall’s Island. (Gothamist)

How the global diamond trade helped shape the city’s skyline. (The Real Deal)

An SUV driver hit and killed a man he suspected broke into his car on Monday, marking the 21st cyclist to be killed by a driver in the city this year. (Gothamist)

How did a giraffe corpse end up at the bottom of the Lower New York Bay? How about a piano in the Bronx River? These are the mysteries of Underwater New York. (Patch)

Photos from J’Ouvert 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want dinner to feel like going out. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 8, 2019 – The “Boycotting Mega Rich Trump Supporters is Messy Business” Edition

How to research apartment buildings, One World Trade’s scent, stand-out dishes in the West Village, Cuomo tries to change the gun conversation and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

How should the city’s justice system fight gun violence? The NYPD and Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez have differing opinions, and no matter how difficult it is for them to see eye-to-eye on the matter, no one can ignore that shootings are up 10% and gun arrests are up 91% in Brooklyn. (NY Times)

It was a mass panic in Times Square as people fled for safety, storming bars or theaters, literally anywhere to escape what sounded like gunshots. It was a motorcycle backfiring. (NY Times)

You might be surprised how many playgrounds are built on top of cemeteries. (Untapped Cities)

On Wednesday, the outrage machine was aimed at Stephen Ross, the billionaire behind the Hudson Yards whose company owns Equinox, who is hosting a fundraiser for President Trump this weekend to the tune of a quarter-million dollars per person. People are calling on Equinox members to cancel their memberships, but if you’re looking to boycott businesses Ross has investments in, you better make a list, because it starts with SoulCycle, Momofuku, Milk Bar, &pizza, Beyond Sushi, and Bluestone Lane before you get into the companies his company invested in. When it comes to the mega-rich, boycotting is a messy business. (Eater)

Interested in finding out who you know that donated to Trump? Here’s an easy set of instructions to follow to make family gatherings really awkward this year. (Splinter)

Now that the primary is officially over, Melinda Katz is focused on the Queens DA election. (amNY)

If we’ve learned anything from the Katz/Cabán DA primary battle, it is that all votes count in NYC and everyone has to be extremely careful to make sure they fill out their ballots, affidavit or not, properly. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is attempting to shape the Democratic Primary by asking all candidates to endorse a list of gun reforms including banning assault weapons, creating a database to prevent the mentally ill from purchasing weapons, expanding buybacks, and “red flag” legislation that would allow individuals to seek court orders preventing others from buying guns. (Politico)

After a brief suspension, @placardabuse is back on Twitter, documenting all the different ways that cars with parking placards regularly abuse the privileges their placards may grant them. (Streetsblog)

12 stand-out dishes to try in the West Village. (Eater)

Where does the water go when you flush? Easy question, complex answer. (amNY)

One World Trade’s observatory has a scent, and it’s there on purpose. (NY Times)

How to research a building before you move in. You don’t want the reason that two-bedroom apartment is cheap to be because of the awful history of bedbug infestations. (Curbed)

An interview with State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, Brooklyn’s last standing elected Republican. She’s running for Congress to try to unseat Max Rose, possibly leaving the entire borough solidly blue in the process. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Sunshine Cinema building on the Lower East Side has been completely demolished. (Curbed)

The woman who was arrested and had her one-year-old son pulled out of her hands for sitting on the floor at a benefits office has, as expected, sued the city, the officers involved, the HRA and the NYPD. (Politico)

The city’s taxi regulators voted to approve the cap on ride-hailing app vehicles and limited how long drivers can wait for fares in Manhattan. In six months, the commission will evaluate if they should issue new licenses. (Patch)

Finding a pool table at a bar is getting more and rarer, but the tables are far from gone. (amNY)

Last week a judge recommended Daniel Pantaleo be fired for using an illegal chokehold that lead to Eric Garner’s death. One week later the protests have begun as the mayor has remained silent and the city waits for action from commissioner James O’Neill. (amNY)

The DOT announced a speed-up in the timeline for installing protected bike lanes on 4th Ave in Brooklyn, connecting Bay Ridge to Park Slope and will do so by the end of this year. While the city will never get Em Samolewicz back after she was killed by a driver in Sunset Park, her death isn’t going without action from the city to protect other cyclists from meeting the same fate. (Curbed)

A fund to honor Em at Third Root Community Health Center is being established that will welcome trans women & trans femmes to receive healing services from Third Root at no cost. Em was an admin staff member since 2016. (GoFundMe)

A farm? On Staten Island? Yes, and it’s part of the amenities. (The Real Deal)

Raising the minimum wage for restaurant workers hasn’t hurt the restaurant industry as a whole, despite protests to the contrary every time it’s proposed. (amNY)

A group of rent-stabilized tenants in the Lower East Side and Williamsburg are accusing their landlord of continuing with eviction harassment, illegal overcharges, and preferential rent hikes—despite New York’s recently passed rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

Thousands of children, parents and staff members from the Harlem Children’s Zone marched in this year’s Children’s March for Peace. The match started after an elementary school girl was hit with a stray bullet inside her apartment 25 years ago and with the recent rise in gun violence across the city and country, its message is needed more than ever. (amNY)

The mayor announced $9 million to revitalize social services in Brownsville in response to the recent mass shooting for anti-gun violence programs, to enhance response times from the Brooklyn Action Center, youth education programs, to hire more staff for the recreation center, and more. Last week Jumaane Williams called for more funding and not police to address future problems in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 12 hottest lunch spots right now. (Eater)