The Briefly for September 27-28, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining Returns, Outdoor Dining Becomes Permanent” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: 600k kids return to school this week, the mayor announces future announcements, the best new burgers in the city

Today – Low: 68˚ High: 76˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Video: In case you were wondering, the NYPD’s tactics have not changed in the face of months straight of protests throughout the city. This was the scene last night in the West Village as the NYPD swarmed protesters on 6th St after the “Celebration of Art Of Protest” in Washington Square Park (FreedomNewsTV)

The NYPD ended its training program for officers to de-escalate encounters with people in a mental health crisis. The future of the program is in limbo. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Indoor dining returns this Wednesday in NYC. Here’s how restaurants are preparing. Keep in mind, not every restaurant will be taking part. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Outdoor dining is now permanent. Here’s everything to know about the city’s permanent outdoor dining plan. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Coronavirus anxiety and depression have hit NYC, as a new study says 44% of New Yorkers are feeling anxiety about the virus and 36% felt depressed since the start of our PAUSE. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How will the city’s souvenir shops survive the pandemic without tourists? Maybe they won’t. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Good news for you if you’re someone who has been collecting your compost since the city’s collections stopped in March. Compost drop-off locations return to six Greenmarkets. (Tequila Minsky for The Villager)

The American Museum of Natural History fired Mark E. Siddall after the museum found that he had sexually harassed and bullied a graduate student who was doing research under his supervision. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Tourist helicopters are back to annoy city dwellers and, in a surprising twist, they’re coming from Jersey. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Next year’s city-wide elections will be ranked-choice. I’ve linked to this explainer video multiple times already, so when city officials and candidates argue that we’re not ready for a new voting system, you can tell them to go to hell. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Home sales are surging on Brooklyn. Tell that to the next person who bemoans how many people are leaving the city for the suburbs. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Dianne Smith has a new installation titled “Styling: Black Expression, Rebellion and Joy Through Fashion” that pays tribute to Black women who shape and redefine what it means to be stylish. The location? Nordstrom at Columbus Circle. This is the first full-scale art exhibition at the location. (Roger Clark for NY1)

The MTA is set to run out of money before 2021 and will likely be forced to borrow money to survive. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

When someone vandalized the A train tracks last week, Rikien Wilder was there to clear some of the items thrown on the tracks and tackle the vandal as they tried to get away. The MTA showed their appreciation for Wilder’s heroics with a free year of subway rides. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Here’s someone trying to find the silver lining in the clouds of Century 21’s closing in Bay Ridge. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

It’s a renters market, the Times gives some advice about how to negotiate with your landlord. (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

On August 23, 1974, John Lennon claims he saw a UFO outside Midtown East apartment. (Dave Lifton for Ultimate Classic Rock)

The apartment that John Lennon was living in, and saw the UFO from, is now for sale for $5.5 million. It’s a 4,000 triplex and it’s also where the iconic John Lennon “New York City” photo was taken. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe you’ll see your own UFOs after purchasing the apartment because UFO sightings are up in New York. At 184 sightings, we’ve already exceeded the 151 sightings total for 2019. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The asshole of the week is Heshy Tischler, who crashed a press conference about the uptick in Covid-19 cases in the Ocean Parkway Cluster without a mask and denying the existence of the virus, causing the press conference to be cut short. (Aidan Graham and Meaghan McGoldrick for amNewYork Metro)

“There’s rampant COVID denialism and misinformation abound in the community. People are not getting tested and are refusing care even when sick. This is deeply distressing.” Three men from Orthodox communities died from Covid-19 last week at Maimonides Hospital. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Bill de Blasio held a press conference announcing that he will hold future press conferences about the city’s “rebirth.” I’d argue the city’s rebirth starts on election day 2021 when we pick a new mayor. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor bowed to pressure from Upper West Siders to remove 300 homeless men from a temporary shelter. Then he took that decision back. Then he took that decision back and removing the 300 homeless New Yorkers from their temporary shelter and move them to another shelter in the Financial District in a move being called “the pinnacle of cowardliness.” Most politicians reveal their true selves once they are no longer up for re-election. I guess the mayor is showing us all who he really is. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The mayor’s pledge to close Rikers Island is falling apart. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Thanks to a federal judge’s ruling, you have until October 31 to fill out your census information. The Trump administration had tried to shorten the deadline to September 30 and the city is woefully behind on people filling it out. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

John Burns, a longtime friend of the mayor and first deputy commissioner at the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, resigned under fire after an investigation found he mistreated a female employee and created a hostile workplace. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Photos: A first look at Eataly’s honey-themed rooftop restaurant. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

It’s a fantastical idea: The Mandragore would use half of Roosevelt Island to build the country’s tallest building and the world’s tallest “carbon sink” that would actually reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the city and generate energy with wind turbines and solar panels. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Miles Morales: Spider-Man, coming for the PlayStation 4 and 5, uses Harlem as its setting, a rare location for a digital depiction of New York City. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

The six best new burgers in the city. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Photos: Check out the new bike-based cargo delivery vehicles you’ll be seeing around the city soon. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

What’s your subway station number? An interactive subway map that gives you a ranking as a New Yorker based on every subway station you’ve ever been to. (My score was 152, giving me the title of “NYC Lifer”) (The Cleverest)

10 great places to see on a Brooklyn Greenway bike ride. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: Inside the secret train track hidden in the depths of Grand Central Terminal. (Emily Nonko for 6sqft)

Restoration work on the Empire State Building’s Art Deco spire is complete, giving the building’s “hat” its original silhouette. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The mayor announced 9,000 furloughs of managers and city employees not under union contracts. The unlucky 9,000 will be laid off for five cays between October and March. The mayor’s looking to save a billion dollars to prevent 22,000 layoffs and these furloughs will save $21 million. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Among these 9,000? The Department of Education announced furloughs for superintendents and other non-union management will be furloughed. Perfect timing as schools are reopening. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

70 staff members as IS 51 in Staten Island are in quarantine after a teacher tested positive for Covid-19. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

In a reversal of education department policy, city teachers will now be allowed to work remotely if they are teaching students who are learning from home, according to a new agreement reached Friday between the city and the teachers union. Seems weird they’d be forced to come to a school building to teach remote students, right? (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Here’s what you need to know about K-8 students returning to schools this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The secret patios of NYC, where you can eat and drink away from the street. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo from The Edge!

The Briefly for May 1, 2020 – The “Are We The City That Sleeps Now?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the UHaul full of bodies in Flatlands, the Bronx gets its first Krispy Kreme, a QAnon believer is arrested in Manhattan, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 62˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 56˚ High: 73˚

The story behind Frank Sinatra’s version of “New York, New York,” how it saved his career, and how it almost never happened. I still maintain that the Sinatra version should only be played at Yankee Stadium when the Yankees win. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

There has never been a better time to go vegetarian, as New York City may be looking at a possible meat shortage. Even the idea of a meat shortage may lead to one, as people will begin to overbuy meat. (Ron Lee for NY1)

The subways will shut down between 1 am and 5 am every day so every subway car can be disinfected. Buses will continue to run. Overnight service will be back when “customer demand returns.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If it seems stupid to close a 1,000-acre national recreation area from the public in order to park 100 MTA buses, you’re right. The Gateway National Recreation Area is working to allow members of the Floyd Bennett Gardens Association access to their gardens, but the mayor is one of the voices calling for the reopening of the former airfield. (Jose Martinez and Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

11 excellent burgers, available for takeout or delivery. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

The City Council approved the conversion of a former Jehovah’s Witness hotel into a 500-unit affordable housing complex in DUMBO. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

A little bit more on the bodies found in a truck outside a Flatlands funeral home. A 911 caller reported they were seeing “blood coming from one of the trucks.” The NYPD said the 15 bodies had been in the non-refrigerated truck for over a week, but no crimes had been committed. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

The Pegu Club in Soho, regarded as “one of the best bars ever” by Grub Street, is closing for good. Their lease was up in October, but they couldn’t make it through the temporary closure during the pandemic. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Cocktail hour, which could be any hour as time has lost all meaning, is back. (Gina Bellafante for NY Times)

21 top-notch Thai restaurants still open in NYC. (Dan Q. Dao for Eater)

The Bronx has its first Krispy Kreme. At this point, who doesn’t need a load of sugar? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A look inside the New York City Archaeological Repository for the city’s earliest pottery. A wild thought for a city that considers an alley where The Ramones once hung out in the 70s a piece of history. (Justin W. Thomas for Untapped New York)

NY Attorney General Letitia James is calling on cable companies to provide financial relief to consumers until live sports programming is resumed. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The mayor says the NYPD will enforce social distancing, and this time he means it, even if he’s said this multiple times now. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The story of Colleen and Ian Bock and the Acre, the restaurant in Ridgewood she was almost ready to open right when everything went to hell. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Advocates are hoping to see one million New Yorkers participate in today’s rent strike, hoping to put pressure on the governor to take immediate action for rent relief and prevent evictions down the line. (Davin Gannon for 6sqt)

The city is distributing 100,000 free face coverings in parks across all five boroughs, starting as early as this weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Disability Rights New York is suing the governor for not including an American Sign Language interpreter at his daily press conferences. The governor’s office responded that ASL versions of the daily press conferences are available on the web. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

The city’s Small Business Services has issued $8 million in loans to small businesses but is disproportionately providing 66% of the available loans to Manhattan businesses. Businesses in the Bronx have received $80,000 in loans, only 1%, but has seen 23% of the city’s positive COVID-19 tests. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you have a car that you haven’t used in a while, maybe it’s time to check the engine for rat colony. (Caity Weaver for NY Times)

Farewell to the USNS Comfort, which treated 182 COVID-19 patients while it was in New York. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

IKEA is working with the Queens Borough Presidents’s office to donate about 14,000 products to Queens-based non-profits and shelters. (Michael Gordan for Queens Post)

School food service employees, who are doing the work to distribute millions of meals to NYC, say they’re not adequately protected or acknowledged for their exposure to the public. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

An Illinois woman was arrested in Manhattan carrying 18 knives and other weapons in her vehicle after she allegedly threatened Joe Biden, and Hillary Clinton. Jessica Prim, who goes by Kimita Steel online, was broadcasting on Facebook Live when she was arrested by the Secret Service, spouting QAnon bullshit conspiracy theories and headed towards the USNS Comfort. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“I am eligible,” declares a governor to all Cuomosexuals. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deep and leveled look at what makes it so difficult for the city’s messaging about staying safe and social distancing to penetrate the Hasidic and Ultra-Orthodox communities and why de Blasio’s singling them out publicly in the manner that he did only stands to make the problem worse. (Elad Nehorai for HuffPost)

The photographers who are capturing an empty New York City, creating a powerful and eerie set of images we never thought we’d see. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Are you one of the New Yorkers re-creating famous book covers inside your home? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to get affordable takeout. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 6, 2020 – The “We Have Infected the Tigers in the Bronx Zoo” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Dog parks are closed in NYC, NYSC forced to stop charging memberships, a map of essential construction, art for physical distancing, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 62˚
Clear throughout the day.

Mario Salerno, hero. Mario’s the landlord in Williamsburg who waived April’s rent for all his tenants. (Rebeca Ibarra for Gothamist)

The city is closing all dog parks and runs

Baruch Feldheim, who was arrested for price gouging over 100,000 masks, over half a million gloves and 192,000 N95 respirators, is an asshole and his supply is being given to doctors and nurses for their fair market value. (Neil Vigdor for NY Times)

The USNS Comfort is here with its 1,000 hospital beds, and there are 20 patients on it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

China sent 1,000 ventilators to assist in the state’s efforts to keep us all alive. (Alyse Stanley for Gizmodo)

The state launched a new COVID-19 tracker that gives county by county information, including numbers on testing, infections, and deaths. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The city leased at least 20 hotels to deal with the coronavirus hospital surge, converting entire floors into hospital wards for a total of 10,000 additional beds. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

11 pieces of art to discover at a safe physical distance. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Wear something over your nose and mouth when you go out in public. This is to save the rest of the city from you, even if you don’t think that you’re sick, you may still be carrying COVID-19. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

It’s an awful benchmark, but here we are. New York’s deaths from COVID-19 outnumber the deaths on 9/11. (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

A clarification on last week’s “the NYPD won’t show up if you have a minor car crash” story, outlining the scenarios where the NYPD will actually show up. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Amazon’s PR campaign to shift blame to Christopher Smalls, the man who organized the walkout in their Staten Island facility, is failing. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Opera is back this week, streaming performances of Puccini, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Donizetti, and Gounod every night. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

State legislators are pushing for the city to provide EMS workers with housing during the COVID-19 crisis, as some have resorted to sleeping in their cars to avoid bringing the virus into their homes. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Complaints to 311 about noise have dropped significantly, despite everyone being told to stay home as much as possible. Reports are down over 30% from last year. Are we being quieter or are we deciding it’s not worth bothering the police? (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

RIP Carmine Notaro, the owner of Carmine’s Original Pizza in Greenpoint. (Greenpointers)

Video: Union Square, Greenwich Village, and Washington Square Park in a pandemic. (James and Karla)

Curious if a construction site near your apartment is deemed “essential?” Check out the new map from the Department of Buildings listing Essential Active Construction Sites. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Project)

The bleak reality inside Rikers Island’s coronavirus quarantine unit. (Angelina Chapin for HuffPost)

A 51-year-old woman was beaten on a city bus in the Bronx last week by a group of riders who blamed her for the COVID-19 outbreak. Three 15-year-old girls were arrested for hate crime assault, menacing, and harassment. The NYPD is searching for a fourth teen. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

360° Video: Driving through an empty Times Square. (ActionKid)

The state’s Attorney General’s office ordered New York Sports Club to stop charging for membership while their gyms are forcibly closed. If anyone has ever had a membership with NYSC, you know how impossible it is to get them to stop charging your credit card. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Video: Learn about Manhattan’s original citizens, the Lenape. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

“Only in the last really 48 hours or so do they feel they’ve seen evidence around the world ― particularly a new study coming out of Singapore ― that shows more evidence that this disease can be spread by asymptomatic people.” This wasn’t a quote from the governor of Georgia, this was our own idiot mayor saying something that the rest of us have assumed for weeks. (Ja’han Jones for HuffPost)

The city banned the use of Zoom for remote learning over security and privacy concerns. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The Department of Education’s grab-and-go free meal service has been expanded to include anyone who wants food, no questions asked. There are 435 pickup spots across the city for pickups between 7:30 am and 11:30 am. (Sophia Cheng for Gothamist)

What kind of idiot do you have to be to gather by the hundreds for a funeral for a man who died of COVID-19? The death itself should stand as a literal reminder to treat this pandemic seriously, yet the NYPD had to break up a crowd of hundreds who gathered for the funeral of a rabbi. (Molly Crane-Newman for Daily News)

The best burgers in NYC still available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Thanks to Chris Walker for today’s featured photo.