The Briefly for May 1, 2020 – The “Are We The City That Sleeps Now?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the UHaul full of bodies in Flatlands, the Bronx gets its first Krispy Kreme, a QAnon believer is arrested in Manhattan, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 62˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 56˚ High: 73˚

The story behind Frank Sinatra’s version of “New York, New York,” how it saved his career, and how it almost never happened. I still maintain that the Sinatra version should only be played at Yankee Stadium when the Yankees win. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

There has never been a better time to go vegetarian, as New York City may be looking at a possible meat shortage. Even the idea of a meat shortage may lead to one, as people will begin to overbuy meat. (Ron Lee for NY1)

The subways will shut down between 1 am and 5 am every day so every subway car can be disinfected. Buses will continue to run. Overnight service will be back when “customer demand returns.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If it seems stupid to close a 1,000-acre national recreation area from the public in order to park 100 MTA buses, you’re right. The Gateway National Recreation Area is working to allow members of the Floyd Bennett Gardens Association access to their gardens, but the mayor is one of the voices calling for the reopening of the former airfield. (Jose Martinez and Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

11 excellent burgers, available for takeout or delivery. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

The City Council approved the conversion of a former Jehovah’s Witness hotel into a 500-unit affordable housing complex in DUMBO. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

A little bit more on the bodies found in a truck outside a Flatlands funeral home. A 911 caller reported they were seeing “blood coming from one of the trucks.” The NYPD said the 15 bodies had been in the non-refrigerated truck for over a week, but no crimes had been committed. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

The Pegu Club in Soho, regarded as “one of the best bars ever” by Grub Street, is closing for good. Their lease was up in October, but they couldn’t make it through the temporary closure during the pandemic. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Cocktail hour, which could be any hour as time has lost all meaning, is back. (Gina Bellafante for NY Times)

21 top-notch Thai restaurants still open in NYC. (Dan Q. Dao for Eater)

The Bronx has its first Krispy Kreme. At this point, who doesn’t need a load of sugar? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A look inside the New York City Archaeological Repository for the city’s earliest pottery. A wild thought for a city that considers an alley where The Ramones once hung out in the 70s a piece of history. (Justin W. Thomas for Untapped New York)

NY Attorney General Letitia James is calling on cable companies to provide financial relief to consumers until live sports programming is resumed. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The mayor says the NYPD will enforce social distancing, and this time he means it, even if he’s said this multiple times now. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The story of Colleen and Ian Bock and the Acre, the restaurant in Ridgewood she was almost ready to open right when everything went to hell. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Advocates are hoping to see one million New Yorkers participate in today’s rent strike, hoping to put pressure on the governor to take immediate action for rent relief and prevent evictions down the line. (Davin Gannon for 6sqt)

The city is distributing 100,000 free face coverings in parks across all five boroughs, starting as early as this weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Disability Rights New York is suing the governor for not including an American Sign Language interpreter at his daily press conferences. The governor’s office responded that ASL versions of the daily press conferences are available on the web. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

The city’s Small Business Services has issued $8 million in loans to small businesses but is disproportionately providing 66% of the available loans to Manhattan businesses. Businesses in the Bronx have received $80,000 in loans, only 1%, but has seen 23% of the city’s positive COVID-19 tests. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you have a car that you haven’t used in a while, maybe it’s time to check the engine for rat colony. (Caity Weaver for NY Times)

Farewell to the USNS Comfort, which treated 182 COVID-19 patients while it was in New York. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

IKEA is working with the Queens Borough Presidents’s office to donate about 14,000 products to Queens-based non-profits and shelters. (Michael Gordan for Queens Post)

School food service employees, who are doing the work to distribute millions of meals to NYC, say they’re not adequately protected or acknowledged for their exposure to the public. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

An Illinois woman was arrested in Manhattan carrying 18 knives and other weapons in her vehicle after she allegedly threatened Joe Biden, and Hillary Clinton. Jessica Prim, who goes by Kimita Steel online, was broadcasting on Facebook Live when she was arrested by the Secret Service, spouting QAnon bullshit conspiracy theories and headed towards the USNS Comfort. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“I am eligible,” declares a governor to all Cuomosexuals. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deep and leveled look at what makes it so difficult for the city’s messaging about staying safe and social distancing to penetrate the Hasidic and Ultra-Orthodox communities and why de Blasio’s singling them out publicly in the manner that he did only stands to make the problem worse. (Elad Nehorai for HuffPost)

The photographers who are capturing an empty New York City, creating a powerful and eerie set of images we never thought we’d see. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Are you one of the New Yorkers re-creating famous book covers inside your home? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to get affordable takeout. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 6, 2020 – The “We Have Infected the Tigers in the Bronx Zoo” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Dog parks are closed in NYC, NYSC forced to stop charging memberships, a map of essential construction, art for physical distancing, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 62˚
Clear throughout the day.

Mario Salerno, hero. Mario’s the landlord in Williamsburg who waived April’s rent for all his tenants. (Rebeca Ibarra for Gothamist)

The city is closing all dog parks and runs

Baruch Feldheim, who was arrested for price gouging over 100,000 masks, over half a million gloves and 192,000 N95 respirators, is an asshole and his supply is being given to doctors and nurses for their fair market value. (Neil Vigdor for NY Times)

The USNS Comfort is here with its 1,000 hospital beds, and there are 20 patients on it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

China sent 1,000 ventilators to assist in the state’s efforts to keep us all alive. (Alyse Stanley for Gizmodo)

The state launched a new COVID-19 tracker that gives county by county information, including numbers on testing, infections, and deaths. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The city leased at least 20 hotels to deal with the coronavirus hospital surge, converting entire floors into hospital wards for a total of 10,000 additional beds. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

11 pieces of art to discover at a safe physical distance. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Wear something over your nose and mouth when you go out in public. This is to save the rest of the city from you, even if you don’t think that you’re sick, you may still be carrying COVID-19. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

It’s an awful benchmark, but here we are. New York’s deaths from COVID-19 outnumber the deaths on 9/11. (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

A clarification on last week’s “the NYPD won’t show up if you have a minor car crash” story, outlining the scenarios where the NYPD will actually show up. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Amazon’s PR campaign to shift blame to Christopher Smalls, the man who organized the walkout in their Staten Island facility, is failing. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Opera is back this week, streaming performances of Puccini, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Donizetti, and Gounod every night. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

State legislators are pushing for the city to provide EMS workers with housing during the COVID-19 crisis, as some have resorted to sleeping in their cars to avoid bringing the virus into their homes. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Complaints to 311 about noise have dropped significantly, despite everyone being told to stay home as much as possible. Reports are down over 30% from last year. Are we being quieter or are we deciding it’s not worth bothering the police? (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

RIP Carmine Notaro, the owner of Carmine’s Original Pizza in Greenpoint. (Greenpointers)

Video: Union Square, Greenwich Village, and Washington Square Park in a pandemic. (James and Karla)

Curious if a construction site near your apartment is deemed “essential?” Check out the new map from the Department of Buildings listing Essential Active Construction Sites. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Project)

The bleak reality inside Rikers Island’s coronavirus quarantine unit. (Angelina Chapin for HuffPost)

A 51-year-old woman was beaten on a city bus in the Bronx last week by a group of riders who blamed her for the COVID-19 outbreak. Three 15-year-old girls were arrested for hate crime assault, menacing, and harassment. The NYPD is searching for a fourth teen. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

360° Video: Driving through an empty Times Square. (ActionKid)

The state’s Attorney General’s office ordered New York Sports Club to stop charging for membership while their gyms are forcibly closed. If anyone has ever had a membership with NYSC, you know how impossible it is to get them to stop charging your credit card. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Video: Learn about Manhattan’s original citizens, the Lenape. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

“Only in the last really 48 hours or so do they feel they’ve seen evidence around the world ― particularly a new study coming out of Singapore ― that shows more evidence that this disease can be spread by asymptomatic people.” This wasn’t a quote from the governor of Georgia, this was our own idiot mayor saying something that the rest of us have assumed for weeks. (Ja’han Jones for HuffPost)

The city banned the use of Zoom for remote learning over security and privacy concerns. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The Department of Education’s grab-and-go free meal service has been expanded to include anyone who wants food, no questions asked. There are 435 pickup spots across the city for pickups between 7:30 am and 11:30 am. (Sophia Cheng for Gothamist)

What kind of idiot do you have to be to gather by the hundreds for a funeral for a man who died of COVID-19? The death itself should stand as a literal reminder to treat this pandemic seriously, yet the NYPD had to break up a crowd of hundreds who gathered for the funeral of a rabbi. (Molly Crane-Newman for Daily News)

The best burgers in NYC still available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Thanks to Chris Walker for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for February 12, 2020 – The “Maybe You Have A Better Idea for This?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on brokers fees, can you ever actually leave New York, a 10 layer sandwich to behold, Bloomberg doesn’t want you to hear this, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 45˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.

Thursday is the deadline for you to change political parties in New York state. (NY1)

A draft of Citi Bike’s Bronx expansion, mapped. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A water main breaks in New York City literally every day. There gas been more than 400 recorded water main breaks every years since 1998. It’s rare, but becoming decreasingly so, that they cause subway delays. (James Barron for NY Times)

The city, having given up on the idea of fixing the Brooklyn Bridge’s promenade, is asking you, yes you, to help come up with “creative improvements.” For being a finalist and solving a problem the city has been plagued with for years, you’ll earn yourself $13,000 and you’ve only got until April 5. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Video: The locksmith working out of Manhattan’s smallest building. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Thinking about moving? A guide of where to live in NYC• in 2020. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Victor Calise could be the MTA’s first disabled board member. The mayor nominated Calise to fill the seat made vacant in April 2019 and still has another nomination to make. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Is J.G. Melon’s burger still among the city’s best burgers? According to Eater’s Ryan Rutton, it’s a simple answer of “no.” Order the chile con carne instead. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Nothing to see, just a car engulfed in flames in Crown Heights. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Photos and Video: Inside the home of Denny Daniel, which doubles as The Museum of Interesting Things. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re someone who has to conquer the biggest and the baddest challenges out there, maybe this 10-layer Mexican sandwich is your speed with hot dogs, ham, refried beans, beed Milanese, and more. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The REAL ID law is going to cause nightmares for everyone. Come October, you won’t be able to get on a domestic flight using your drivers license unless it’s a REAL ID license. The only way to get it is to physically go to the DMV, which is bound to cause a rush towards the end of the summer. Here’s what you need to know. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to eat in Manhattan’s Chinatown. (Eater)

It’s not common that a speakeasy and its cover story are both useful, but the newly opened The Little Shop near the South Street Seaport is a fully functioning bodega and speakeasy all wrapped into one. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Five legends of the Upper West Side. (Edgar Catasus for I Love the Upper West Side)

Get ready for a hand-painted Alice in Wonderland pop-up to dominate your Instagram feed starting next month. Behind the pop-up is Alexa Meade, the artist behind Ariana Grande’s “God is a Woman music video (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What happens when you leave New York City?” Easy answer, you fall of the face of the earth. (David Crook for StreetEasy)

The Tavern by WS at Hudson Yards is “better than it should be.” Two stars. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

First you didn’t have to pay a brokers fee and now you have to? Here’s what’s going on with the brokers fee system. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Whoops, someone released a clip of Mike “please don’t say anything bad about me, I’ve spent a quarter billion dollars on this doomed presidential run” Bloomberg saying “The way you get the guns out of the kids’ hands is to throw them against the wall and frisk them,” in defense of Stop and Frisk. Bloomberg apologized for Stop and Frisk last November and maybe he thinks that’s all he’ll ever have to say on this subject? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The First Avenue L train station in Manhattan has a second new entrance on Avenue A. The entrance is not yet handicapped accessible and the MTA hopes elevators will be open by June. (Muhammad Rahman for Gothamist)

Meet the young district leader candidates looking to challenge Brooklyn’s democratic party’s status quo from the literal bottom up. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

13 bars to find a shot and beer combo for $5 or less. Unsurprisingly, I’ve been to all of these bars. (Erik Helin for Thrillist)

Thanks to my beautiful wife Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo.