The Briefly for April 18, 2019 – The “Tough Talk From A Mayor Who Can’t Back It Up” Edition

A five-alarm fire in Marine Park, poking more holes in congestion pricing, the view from Brooklyn’s tallest tower, universal rent control and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The view from the top of Brooklyn’s tallest tower is magnificent, but it’ll only be the tallest tower for a short period of time. (Curbed)

The latest hole poked in the city’s congestion pricing condom is for Bronx residents, who will not have to pay to cross the Henry Hudson Bridge. (Streets Blog)

Mayor de Blasio touts the NYC Ferry system for addressing some of New York’s “historic inequities,” despite having literally zero evidence to back up his claim. (amNY)

The mayor claims the reason for his crackdown on electric bikes has been safety, but he’s either willfully lying or he’s pathetically uninformed. Neither option is great. There were 45,775 motor vehicle collisions that resulted in injuries, 31 of those involving electric bikes and 23 of those were injuries to the rider of the bike. Zero pedestrians were killed by bikes, electric or otherwise. (Streetsblog)

The NYPD only cost the city $230 million in settlements last year. $25.4 million of that was a settlement in a federal class-action lawsuit related to the NYPD’s illegal arrest quotas, which the NYPD denies is still happening, while it is still very much happening. (Gothamist)

The mayor declared Tuesday “Jin Park Day” in honor of Harvard student Jin Park, the first undocumented Rhodes scholar in history who has been a longtime NYC resident. (Huff Post)

The 16 best French restaurants in New York. (Grub Street)

The $3 billion Amazon tax subsidy is dead. Are any lawmakers daring enough to go after the film tax credit, which has given out $6.5 billion in subsidies in the last fifteen years? (Gothamist)

Take a video tour of Brooklyn… from 1949. (js4653)

How to find temporary student housing in the city. (StreetEasy)

Long Island City’s Noguchi Museum is making a 6,000 square foot expansion and opening Noguchi’s original studio building. The expansion is expected to be finished by 2021. (Curbed)

10 iconic Bushwick landmarks. None of them involve unicycles, Four Loko can structures, mustache wax, or eight people living in a two bedroom apartment. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With the Democrats in firm control of New York, tenants are seeing more protections, which may include “universal rent control.” (NY Times)

Rent control is good for cities according to a new study. The city’s welfare went up when rent control increased. The reduction of the housing supply was outweighed by the positive effect of not worrying about losing your home. (Gothamist)

A closer look at how Oregon implemented Universal Rent Control to stop a crisis of displacement and gentrification. (Curbed)

Surprise the Harry Potter fan in your life with reservations to The Wizard Brunch when it hits NYC, which recreates an experience that is close but not to an infringing level, of eating at Hogwarts. (Time Out)

Avoid spicy tuna rolls and all raw tuna for a while. The CDC and FDA flagged it as part of a recall of Salmonella-tainted tuna coming from a company in Louisiana. New York was one of 13 states affected. Go for vegetarian options. (Gothamist)

Where to get rid of your unwanted shit when doing your spring cleaning. (6sqft)

Continuing his Justice 2020 push to move away from an over-reliance of jailing people, Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez announced a softer parole policy for Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The City’s Board of Health mandatory measles vaccination was upheld in a unanimous Health Department vote. No one has been fined $1,000, but over 500 children have been vaccinated in the last week. (Gothamist)

Street vendors will take over empty subway storefronts in Corona, thanks to a partnership with the MTA announced State Senator Jessica Ramos. (Curbed)

Where to get a Passover meal in the city. (Patch)

A Brooklyn Supreme Court judge temporarily blocked a plan to build two 16-story rental buildings, the construction of the buildings is opposed by activist groups and the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Gothamist)

We are one step closer to a five-cent fee for a paper bags once the plastic bag ban is enacted. (amNY)

It took about four hours, but nearly 200 firefighters put out a five-alarm fire in Marine Park. (Bklyner)

The M14 needs to step it up before the L Project ruins your trip to Williamsburg for brunch according to Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. Maybe she didn’t say the brunch part. (amNY)

A new law will prevent ICE from making arrests inside courthouses without judicial warrants. (TIme)

Happy Easter this Sunday, that’s also the day the city’s subways and buses will rise. (amNY)

A man was arrested for trying to carry two gas cans, two bottles of lighter fluid, and two butane lighters into St. Patricks Cathedral. He claims he was just cutting through the Cathedral to Madison Ave. Dude, come on. (NY Times)

Rents in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens have hit an all-time high. Prices dropped in Williamsburg and Greenpoint, but now that Cuomo’s L Project has taken over for the L Shutdown, kiss that trend goodbye. Where is Jimmy McMillan when we need him? (StreetEasy)

Where to eat regionally inspired Mexican food in the city. (Eater)

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The Briefly for April 17, 2019 – The “L Project Will Take Train Service From Suck to Blow” Edition

Amazon passed over Industry City before leaving Long Island City, the best bars in Nolita and Soho, Rosé Mansion returns this summer, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Long before Amazon decided not to build a headquarters in Long Island City, they decided not to build at Industry City. The details came out thanks to a Freedom of Information Law request and shows just how far the developers were willing to go to become Amazon City ahead of their billion dollar rezoning request. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about what’s open and what’s closed on Good Friday, Passover and Easter across the city. (Patch)

Here is the subway map and schedule for the L Project, which starts on April 26 and will take the trains service from suck to blow for the foreseeable future. (Gothamist)

Congratulations to the Bed-Stuy chess team for winning second place in the All-Girls National Chess Championship in Chicago last weekend. (Patch)

Squibb Bridge, the pedestrian bridge connecting Brooklyn Bridge Park and Brooklyn Heights will be demolished and rebuilt after opening in only 2013. The BQE Rehab won’t interfere with the bridge, meaning work can get started faster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If Skynet ever becomes a reality, you can rest assured that the city’s government won’t play a hand in its creation. The mayor’s artificial intelligence task force has met 20 times in the last year and has accomplished, as far as reporting has shown, absolutely nothing but infighting and typical government inefficiencies. Like many of the mayor’s projects, there was no explicitly stated goals or scope to the work they are expected to achieve. (Curbed)

Close your eyes and picture a variety show in Bushwick. Good. Now turn up the saturation and volume past the point of being polite. If you’ve got a wild enough imagination, you’ve pictured something close to Eric Schmalenberger’s Blunderland Variety Show in its seventh year. (Bushwick Daily)

Hold on to your Instagram accounts, Rosé Mansion is returning this summer. (amNY)

In “nowhere is safe” news, the Fifth Avenue Apple Store has had a supposed month-long bed bug infestation. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s revamped plans for a completely new system of bus routes is still coming, but much like a city bus, it’s going to arrive later than you want it to. NYC Transit plans to finalize a plan by April 2020. (QNS)

The Lyrid meteor shower will hit its peak on April 22 and 23 and will happen from the 16th to 25th. Take a look upwards at night, you may see some shooting stars. (Patch)

New Jersey politicians think congestion pricing unfairly targets New Jerseyians. Maybe they’ve forgotten the point of congestion pricing is first and foremost to reduce the number of cars driving into Manhattan. (NY Times)

Buckets Of Xanax, no really we’re talking about literal hundreds of thousands of pills in buckets, were seized in a dark web raid that was using Manhattan businesses as return addresses. (Patch)

SPIN’s new ping pong lounge launches next week. The ping pong is free, but how’s the food? (Time Out)

The mayor, unlike some other politicians, has already released his 2018 taxes. Nothing terribly exciting, but he gets credit for doing it. (Politico)

Jumaane Williams, who is both the city’s public advocate and also captain obvious, said that the Hudson Yards is “not for a majority of this city.” (amNY)

The state’s legislature is pushing forward with a bill that would ban religious exemptions for the measles-vaccine for any child attending schools in New York state. Rockland County’s outbreak has infected 186 and Brooklyn’s has infected 259. The World Health Organization labeled measles as one of the 10 largest threats to global health in 2019. (Downtown Express)

An interview with Dr. Jan Kaminsky, Director of Education at Rainbow Health Consulting, and is also developing a National LGBTQ+ Nurses Association. (Gothamist)

The best bars in Soho and Nolita. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for April 11, 2019 – The “Not the Best Place to Live, Not Even Close” Edition

A Y2K-like bug brought down some of the city’s GPS systems, Pat Kiernan has a new podcast, MTA workers fight the upcoming L Project, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York’s favorite news anchor, Pat Kiernan, has a new podcast. (NY1)

The state senate unanimously passed the Religious Garb Act, which will allow the wearing of “any attire, clothing, or facial hair” protected under the Human Rights Law for religious purposes. (QNS)

US News & World Report released the 2019 best places to live and we’re… not #1. Are you insane? We’re 90 out of 125. If you want #1, go move to Austin. (NY Post)

Maybe traffic cameras should, you know, police traffic regulations. That’s what State Assembly Member Michael DenDekker is proposing by adding bicycle lane violations to what traffic cameras enforce. (Sunnyside Post)

Murderinos, this one has your name written all over it. An 80-year-old Queens man was arrested for a Virginia double murder from 1973. (Gothamist)

Turns out those protective sidewalk covers don’t do much when the whole damn building collapses on top of them. No one was hurt when it happened in Williamsburg, except a few cars and maybe a penny-farthing bicycle or unicycle. It’s Williamsburg after all. (Gothamist)

A pizzeria shakedown straight out of a Jon Stewart comedy routine, but it’s real and the “mobsters” are facing up to 20 years in prison. (Brooklyn Paper)

These marijuana entrepreneurs have HIGH hopes for legalization. Get it? HIGH HOPES! Ugh. (Gothamist)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

A guided dumpling crawl through Queens. (Eater)

After 35 years, bookbook on Bleecker Street will be closing. In order to stay open, the store would need a rent reduction and in 2019, that ain’t happening. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The five best grilled cheeses in the city. (Thrillist)

Foreclosures in the Bronx are up 28% in the first quarter of 2019. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s shortest bike lane has been found. (Brooklyn Paper)

This weekend’s “Blessing of the Rides” in Coney Island is a New York City annual tradition. Here’s what to expect from the egg cream christening to the blessing itself. (amNY)

A group of transit workers is calling the L Project’s (the new and crappy name for the non-shutdown) air quality into question with flyers saying the silica dust in the air is a danger to anyone who breathes it in. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez’ office broke up a gun trafficking ring after an undercover detective purchased three dozen guns, including automatic weapons. (amNY)

The Harlem School of the Arts will undergo a $9.5 million renovation that will begin in August and update the brutalist style exterior of the building with a glass wall, and make other welcome improvements. (NY Times)

There is no law dictating that your apartment be 80% covered with rugs, but most leases include it in a clause. What are the consequences for not complying? Well, that’s a little harder to define. (StreetEasy)

A look inside Manhattan’s first Ikea. It looks a lot like an Ikea, but you’re gonna look anyway. (Curbed)

The inevitable lawsuit over the city’s vaccine mandate has arrived. (Gothamist)

Why is there a 3,000 square foot bounce house in Dumbo? Because art, of course. (Time Out)

NYC is being afflicted by a Y2K-esque bug in some of its GPS systems. This is a once every twenty year GPS reset and city officials are being very tight-lipped about it. (NY Times)

What’s going on with the smoldering anus in Union Square? (Gothamist)

Saturday is Record Store Day, the most important holiday for the vinyl obsessed and for record store owners across the city. (amNY)

A look at City Hall Station, the unused subway station where the 6 train turns around which shows the grandeur of how the subways could have been. (NY Times)

The best neighborhoods for college grads. (Localize Labs)

Is removing stops the right way to make a bus route faster? Consider the case of the M14. (Bowery Boogie)

An interview with Carlo Scissura, the head of the new BQE expert panel. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Easter brunch spots.

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