The Briefly for August 19, 2019 – The “Daniel Pantaleo Lied About The Chokehold” Edition

The MTA’s board is as functional as their trains, the rice cooker guy is caught, Nutcracker summer, finding hidden parks and gardens, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subway work is relatively light this week, but still inconvenient if you’re on the 2, 3, 7, A, E, N or Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

Registration for the 2019 Daffodil Project is available. The Daffodil Project was created post-9/11 to create a living memorial to September 11 city-wide by giving out half a million bulbs a year to be planted in public spaces. (New Yorkers for Parks)

It’s been 14 years since the renovations at the Rugby branch of the Brooklyn Public Library started and we’re still a year away from seeing it completed. (The City)

Jose Alzorriz is the 19th cyclist to be killed by a driver on the city’s streets this year. A petition with over 1,000 signatures is calling for a traffic safety study of Coney Island Avenue following his death. (amNY)

Judge Rosemarie Maldonado’s ruling of Daniel Pantaleo’s involvement in the death of Eric Garner is that he was “untruthful” when he said he didn’t use a chokehold and its use was “a gross deviation from the standard of conduct established for a New York City police officer.” So what now? The city waits for commissioner James O’Neill to hopefully fire Pantaleo. (NY Times)

CitiBike is celebrating the one year anniversary of its Reduced Fare Bike Share program with a free month of membership to NYCHA residents and SNAP recipients starting today. (amNY)

In order to accommodate longer buses, the MTA is cutting nine stops from the B38 bus line, which services from Ridgewood in Queens to Downtown Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Paper)

The history and tradition of opening fire hydrants to cool off. (NY Times)

Two things of note: There is a Coca-Cola Freestyle competition and Queen’s Danuta Rybak is one of the five finalists. (QNS)

17 lighthouses to check out before the summer is over. (Untapped Cities)

This weekend is a “Clear the Shelters” weekend, where the ASPCA will be waiving adoption fees for cats and dogs on Saturday. It’s time to get that cat or dog you’ve been thinking about. (Gothamist)

The six best neighborhoods in Brooklyn for a budget. (StreetEasy)

Sixth Ave in Chelsea is deadly for pedestrians and cyclists. A pedestrian, hit by a driver last week, died of her injuries. Over 130 people have died on city streets this year, up from 108 at this time last year. (Streetsblog)

This week’s list of restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. (Patch)

The MTA is removing bus schedules from its bus stops in an attempt to save money. Replacing them is a sign to call 511 or download the MTA’s app. Sixteen politicians from Queens are pushing back, pointing out that access to a cell phone isn’t always a guarantee and the $550,000 saved on bus schedules seems like a drop in the bucket compared to the $42 billion deficit expected by 2022. (amNY)

If you love seeing rats, Brooklyn is your borough. (Bushwick Daily)

Could Tiffany Cabán’s big to win the Democratic nomination for Queens DA have ended with her nomination without the NY Working Families Party? (The Indypendent)

If you missed the Perseid meteor shower, Scott Segler made a time-lapse. (Viewing NYC)

The Brooklyn War Memorial (and nearby bathrooms) will be undergoing renovations starting in November. The monument has been closed for 27 years. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Blue Point Brewing Co is opening a literal underground brewpub. Granted they’ll only have a two-barrel system, but it’s an A for effort. The Hull is expected to open in October. (amNY)

11 people in the city have been hospitalized and treated for “severe lung trauma” after vaping with products THC and nicotine. This isn’t exclusive to New York, similar illnesses have been reported nationwide. (Gothamist)

We may not have jetpacks, but liquid nitrogen, hydraulic presses, and centrifuges are all being used to make cocktails. (Viewing NYC)

A vegan guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The cast of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is raising funds for the homeless youth of the city through Covenant House with a “sleep out” tonight. It’s not about simulating the experience, though Rachel Brosnahan and some cast-mates will be sleeping on 34th St, but raising funds and awareness. Donations can be made at sleepout.org. (amNY)

The MTA’s board is about as functional as the MTA’s trains and buses, as a recent meeting devolved into a shouting match between two members. (amNY)

You can tell your uncle to stop posting on Facebook about Jeffrey Epstein’s death because it was determined to be suicide by the city’s medical examiner. A look at the last days of Jeffrey Epstein. (NY Times)

Video: Watch the boring machine break through the end of the Delaware Aqueduct tunnel repair as the Department of Environmental Protection closes in on a $1 billion repair project. (Gothamist)

A look at Dexter Park, a 20,000 baseball stadium in Woodhaven which was home to the Bushwicks, a semi-pro baseball team part of the Inter-city Baseball Association. (QNS)

The man in the video circulated by the NYPD in connection to the bomb-scare rice cookers left around Manhattan on Friday, 25-year-old Larry K. Griffin II, was taken into custody on Saturday. (NY Times)

Seven Republicans are rushing to lose an election to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Politico)

A map of the city’s hidden parks and secret gardens. (Curbed)

This summer is the Hot Girl Summer, but every summer in New York City is Nutcracker Summer. (NY Times)

The Briefly for August 16, 2019 – The “Everyone is Moving Slower Than We Used To” Edition

This weekend’s subway changes, a look at “environmental review,” real estate brokers are finding ways around rent reforms, de Blasio eats a corn dog and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subways are seriously taking a break from normal service with disruptions on the 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, D, F, M, N, and the Staten Island Railway. (Subway Weekender)

What is “Environmental Review” and why NIMBY lawsuits cite it as a reason to kill projects like the Central Park West bike lane or 14 St busway. (Streetsblog)

A Bronx man will serve a three-to-nine-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to second-degree manslaughter after fleeing the scene of a drunken car crash that killed Jose Cardoso. (Brooklyn Paper)

In the last 10 years, the average speed of a taxi below 60th St has gone from 9mph to 7mph, traffic speeds in midtown are down to 4.9 mph, subway and bus ridership declined, and it’s faster to get anywhere in midtown on a bike. Wherever we’re all going, we’re all getting there slower than ever, unless we’re on a bike. (Gothamist)

There will not be any charges against the driver who killed Aurilla Lawrence with a truck in a hit-and-run crash on February 28. It appears that if a driver claims they didn’t know they hit anyone, the NYPD won’t bring charges. (Streetsblog)

I believe we can all agree gentrification is inevitable, with both positive and negative outcomes,” says a man who is developing “co-living” real estate (read: dorm living for adults) in Bushwick who refuses to call himself a real estate developer. (NY Times)

Only for the brave: You can canoe the Gowanus Canal. (Brooklyn Based)

A guide to the city’s rental-finding websites. (Curbed)

Tribeca, NoLita, and Soho have remained the most expensive neighborhoods to live in for years, but Cobble Hill, Red Hook, and Grammercy Park are climbing that list quickly. (StreetEasy)

Everyone loves a list of hot spots unless it means a literal list of America’s hot spots where temperatures are rising dangerously fast and are past the point of “catastrophic effects.” (Patch)

Revel has added classes in August and September for people who feel trepidation about jumping on an electric moped for the first time. (Streetsblog)

Lobster rolls can be pretty expensive at times, but at $100, the roll at BK Lobster is “infused” with 24K gold. Thirsty for more gold? You can wash it down with wine with 23K gold flakes. (Eater)

Manero’s opens this weekend, the only slice shop on Mulberry St in Little Italy. If the name is familiar, it’s because it’s named for Tony Manero, John Travolta’s character in Saturday Night Fever and even features a double-decker slice in honor of the movie’s opening scene. (Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James’s office has the Sackler Family, the seeming creators of America’s opioid crisis and founders and owners of Perdue Pharma, in its sights. The AG is investigating if the owners hid billions of dollars in an effort to hide profits. (NY Times)

There’s a connection between the rise of Uber and the popularity of late-night and overnight badminton. (Gothamist)

37 chefs give their neighborhood gems. (Grub Street)

Before the Vanderbilts were the Vanderbilts, there was Cornelius Vanderbilt, the man who built the family’s fortunes. In 1794 he was born 209 Port Richmond Ave. You won’t find a monument to the man on that spot, you’ll find No. 1 Chinese Takeout. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after going for a run in Williamsburg, but also after you’ve had a shower and changed your clothes. (The Infatuation)

If you want to watch the mayor eat a corn dog, there is a video of his iconic corn dog-eating moment at the Iowa State Fair that is as cringe as it gets. (@marcusdipaola)

There’s a place in this world for masochism, there really is,” was the mayor’s answer on The Daily Show for if he’s just a sucker for punishment by being the city’s mayor and a presidential candidate. (Gothamist)

An Upper East Side plastic surgeon was arrested in Westchester this week when police found a car full of loaded assault rifles and ballistic armor in the course of responding to a domestic incident. (Gothamist)

Continuing the summer of hate, hundreds of anti-semitic flyers were scattered around the Halsey stop on the L on Wednesday. (QNS)

Say hello to a $10 cup of coffee that might be worth it. (Grub Street)

A list of how companies connected to Stephen Ross have attempted to distance themselves from the man who raised $12 million for President Trump during a single meal last Friday. (6sqft)

Real estate brokers are already finding loopholes around some of the state’s new rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

The city removed a round if applications from the middle and high school admissions process this week. This change doesn’t touch the mayor’s promise to get rid of the SHSAT. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you one of the people among the city’s 82,473 DNA profiles in its genetic database? (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo is looking to expand consequences for mass shooters that are motivated by hate. His proposal would classify killings on the basis of race, religion, creed, or sexual orientation as terrorism and punishable by life in prison without parole. (Gothamist)

16 superior breakfast sandwiches. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 25, 2019 – The “In-N-Out Mystery Has Been Solved” Edition

The MTA will reorganize, Amazon eyes a move in Sunset Park, the mayor will unveil a new bike safety plan, Occupy NYCHA, dog jails return, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

After 17 bicyclists have died on city streets at the hands of drivers, the mayor has decided that his Vision Zero program isn’t enough, and will be unveiling a $58.4 million bike safety plan. (NY Times)

Step inside America’s first theatrical club, The Lambs, with a photo gallery. (Untapped Cities)

Summer Streets makes its return to… the summer’s streets on Saturdays in August on Park Avenue from East 51st St to Foley Square. (Gothamist)

The In-N-Out mystery has been solved. A teenager brought four burgers back from CA and accidentally dropped one in the street. What’s the next city mystery that needs solving? (Eater)

The best cold noodles in NYC. (Grub Street)

Making weekend plans? Here are NYC’s seaside neighborhoods that are calling your name this summer. (amNY)

Eater asks: Is Per Se good again? The answer? “Sort of.” (Eater)

Gothamist is hiring a fulltime digital reporter/producer. (Gothamist)

Firstess Earth Crosby died this week after the injuries she sustained at the end of February from being run over with a truck. The driver was not issued a summons and has not been charged. She was the 59th pedestrian to die in 2019 as a result of the actions of a driver. (Streetsblog)

“Daniel Pantaleo and the other officers involved in Eric Garner’s horrific death should be fired.” Corey Johnson was able to say what our mayor was not. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The slowest Bronx bus is the Bx19 with a speedy 4.8 mph average, the most unreliable is the Bx3, which arrived bunched with other Bx3 buses 19,2% of the time. (Welcome2TheBronx)

“Why put up tin cans?” Sometimes art is too abstract for its own good. There is a backlash against a public art installation in Chinatown by residents because the abstract piece has seemingly no connection to Chinese culture. (Gothamist)

The MTA, after a 1-2 punch of being told by the governor to address the growing homeless population on the subways and learning the contractor they hired to handle homeless outreach was doing anything but, announced a href=”https://www.6sqft.com/mta-moves-to-create-homelessness-task-force-as-outreach-efforts-come-under-scrutiny/”>they will create a homeless task force that will have 30 days to create a plan. (6sqft)

The City Council passed the “Storefront Tracker” bill that requires landlords to report on the storefronts they own and rent out to better help the city understand commercial rents and how many storefronts are vacant across the city. Landlords who don’t comply within 120 days will start to be hit with fines. (Curbed)

Stan Lee Way will be coming to University Ave between Brandt Pl and @ 176 in University Heights, near his childhood home. (Bronx Times)

Remember those little air-conditioned dog jails that popped up outside grocery stores a few years ago? They’re coming back with a “pet harbor” pilot program that will allow you to put your pooch into one of these dog jails for up to an hour. (6sqft)

The state legislature failed to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in 2019. Can they get the job done in 2020? (amNY)

ConEd is only five years late on delivering a plan to help prevent power outages caused by heatwaves. (Gothamist)

Three days after ConEd intentionally cut the power to Brooklyn neighborhoods, there are still people without power. (Brooklyn Paper)

You can get a rare look inside the Little Red Lighthouse in Washington Heights this weekend. (6qft)

11 days after being shut down by the Department of Health, the Time Out Market in DUMBO has reopened. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Nothing will stop the mayor from working out in the Park Slope YMCA, not the one hour drive between Gracie Mansion and Park Slope, and not a bomb threat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

You’re trapped inside a stalled subway train. What do you do? Here’s a guide. (Gothamist)

Don’t let stories about Amazon looking to lease one million square feet in Industry City confuse you, Amazon already leases one million square feet nearby and their contract is ending and they’re reportedly seeing what their options are. (Brownstoner)

Amelia Earhart, Greenwich Villager. (GVSHP)

Three men involved in throwing some water on NYPD officers have been arrested and charged with criminal mischief. Don’t worry, the conversation around this incident has already been blown completely out of proportion by multiple people. (NY Times)

Video: What you need to know about the 1/2/3 train switch replacement at 96th St and how it will ruin your commute. (Viewing NYC)

There will be an Occupy NYCHA rally at City Hall on Friday. Meet the women behind it. (Gothamist)

The MTA approved a reorganization that could cut 2,700 jobs from the agency, save $530 million annually, and will not help your commute. (amNY)

A look at North Crown Heights, where Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and the neighborhood supports an upzoning proposal to create new business opportunities. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

16 bubble tea shops to try in the city. (Eater)

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