The Briefly for May 20, 2020 – The “What to Do if You Find a Baby Bird” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Long Island beaches shut out city residents, Peter Luger’s opens for delivery, delivery by drag queens, Magnolia and the MTA start using UVC lights, & more

Today – Low: 48˚ High: 63˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

After cancelation, reinstatement, appeal, and a rejection the June 23 presidential primary is officially back. This means an additional 615 in-person poll sites, 22 early voting poll sites, and 4,617 poll workers will be required. This is also a reminder that you can and should vote absentee this year. Here’s how. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The Chrysler Building applied to the Landmarks Preservation Commission to add an observation deck on the 61st floor. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

177,700 students will be attending virtual summer school this year. It’s been a tough year for students, so comparing this year’s numbers to any year in the past is not an apples-to-apples comparison, but this is the highest number of students in history. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

What to do if you find a baby bird. Hint: its parents won’t smell you on them. (Beth Skwarecki for Lifehacker)

“My fingernails are breaking, I’ve got hangnails, I’ve been getting my nails done for 14 years … I’m very much into yoga, I can’t go to my Bikram yoga studios, I can’t go get my eyelashes done, I can’t go and socialize with the people that are my friends. It’s led me to depression, it’s made me not feel sexual — I mean it’s awful.” This is a real quote from someone protesting outside a barbershop in Williamsburg, but the protestors were sparse mostly from out of state. If you’re looking for a barbershop to avoid, it’s the Beard Barberia Cut and Shave on the corner of Grand Street, who organized the protest (which drew six!!! people) with the pro-Trump group Liberate America, whose organizer was arrested in 2017 for allegedly jerking off in the back seat of an Uber in CA. (Kevin Dugan for Brooklyn Paper)

This year’s virtual pride celebration’s grand marshals are the Ali Forney Center, Dan Levy, showrunner and star of “Schitt’s Creek,” Yanzi Peng, executive director of LGBT Rights China, and Victoria Cruz, a queer rights activist. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

The mayor announced the city’s heatwave plan, which includes air conditioners for NYCHA and low-income homes, electricity subsidies, misting oases in parks, and open fire hydrants on certain blocks. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Nearly 70% of offices were open concept, what will offices look like when they reopen? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Have you been in a car around the city lately? It’s very weird. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

It’s amazing what a bit of yarn on a fence can do to lift your spirits. A look at the yarn bombing in East Harlem. (Roger Clark for NY1)

Momofuku announced that Ssäm Bar will be moving from the East Village to the Wayō space in Manhattan’s Seaport District. David Chang’s restaurants have chosen increasingly more touristy areas for its restaurants since Trump-supporting billionaire Stephen Ross came on board in 2016. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Peter Luger is offering take-out and delivery for the first time ever. If you’ve been clamoring for food from the restaurants that recently received a zero-star rating from NY Times’s Pete Wells, here’s your chance. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Today (Wednesday) is the Naming The Lost: A 24 Hour COVID Vigil, a 24-hour virtual vigil that starts at 2 pm to provide an opportunity for collective mourning as the number of deaths reaches for 100,000. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio will press the state to approve line-of-duty benefits for families of city workers killed by the coronavirus. The mayor wants the benefits to expand beyond first responders, which is the current limit of federal legislation. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

A weekend project: make Shake Shack’s cheese sauce at home. (Claire Lower for Lifehacker)

Nine hospitals in the city are about to begin allowing visitors again in a test program as Covid-19 is showing signs of abatement. There will be restrictions, but to those who have been in the hospital during this pandemic, I’m sure that any friendly face would be a welcome one. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Five of the most cringe-worthy excerpts from President Trump’s talk with NYC restaurant owners. Thomas Keller from Per Se is kissing the president’s ass so hard these moments he should be embarrassed. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Fresco’s Cantina in Astoria is putting a new spin on delivery with its new “DRAG-livery” service, which involves sending drag queens out to deliver food and perform. The service is an additional $15 on top of a food order. (NY1)

A look at David Bowie’s favorite NYC sandwiches. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Magnolia Bakery’s locations on the Upper West Side and in the West Village are experimenting with new ultraviolet lights that supposedly kill airborne virus particles as people enter the bakery. The light will be in addition to every other protective measure that has been put in place. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Magnolia isn’t the only one getting in on UV lights, the MTA announced it is launching a three-week pilot program using UVC lights, which has been used to disinfect buses in Shanghai. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If your plan was to hear out to Long Island this weekend because the city’s beaches will be closed, tough shit because Long Island’s beaches will be off-limits to city residents. (Marcus Navarro for Politico)

Taste Of Persia, the Persian restaurant once inside a pizza place in Flatiron, is reopening as a delivery-only business. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Why hasn’t Dr. Oxiris Barbot been at the forefront of the city’s communication with the public? The root of the problem seems to be the mayor, who has had a tense history with his Health Department. (J. David Goodman and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Where to find NYC’s best bread delivery right now. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

NYU is planning on allowing students back on campus for the fall semester. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

13% of the city’s nearly 10,000 corrections officers have caught Covid-19. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

Being a fan of the Knicks is fun because every year the Knicks try something new or hire new people and still manage to produce the same garbage results. The Knicks’ latest move is hiring Frank Zanin as an assistant general manager. The Knicks are 67-163 under their current general manager, so Zanin has a tough road ahead of him whenever the NBA starts up again. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Health inspectors are two months into a hiatus on examining local restaurants still open for takeout during the coronavirus pandemic. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Where to get Chinese takeout and delivery. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Emma for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 1, 2020 – The “Are We The City That Sleeps Now?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the UHaul full of bodies in Flatlands, the Bronx gets its first Krispy Kreme, a QAnon believer is arrested in Manhattan, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 62˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 56˚ High: 73˚

The story behind Frank Sinatra’s version of “New York, New York,” how it saved his career, and how it almost never happened. I still maintain that the Sinatra version should only be played at Yankee Stadium when the Yankees win. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

There has never been a better time to go vegetarian, as New York City may be looking at a possible meat shortage. Even the idea of a meat shortage may lead to one, as people will begin to overbuy meat. (Ron Lee for NY1)

The subways will shut down between 1 am and 5 am every day so every subway car can be disinfected. Buses will continue to run. Overnight service will be back when “customer demand returns.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If it seems stupid to close a 1,000-acre national recreation area from the public in order to park 100 MTA buses, you’re right. The Gateway National Recreation Area is working to allow members of the Floyd Bennett Gardens Association access to their gardens, but the mayor is one of the voices calling for the reopening of the former airfield. (Jose Martinez and Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

11 excellent burgers, available for takeout or delivery. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

The City Council approved the conversion of a former Jehovah’s Witness hotel into a 500-unit affordable housing complex in DUMBO. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

A little bit more on the bodies found in a truck outside a Flatlands funeral home. A 911 caller reported they were seeing “blood coming from one of the trucks.” The NYPD said the 15 bodies had been in the non-refrigerated truck for over a week, but no crimes had been committed. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

The Pegu Club in Soho, regarded as “one of the best bars ever” by Grub Street, is closing for good. Their lease was up in October, but they couldn’t make it through the temporary closure during the pandemic. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Cocktail hour, which could be any hour as time has lost all meaning, is back. (Gina Bellafante for NY Times)

21 top-notch Thai restaurants still open in NYC. (Dan Q. Dao for Eater)

The Bronx has its first Krispy Kreme. At this point, who doesn’t need a load of sugar? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A look inside the New York City Archaeological Repository for the city’s earliest pottery. A wild thought for a city that considers an alley where The Ramones once hung out in the 70s a piece of history. (Justin W. Thomas for Untapped New York)

NY Attorney General Letitia James is calling on cable companies to provide financial relief to consumers until live sports programming is resumed. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The mayor says the NYPD will enforce social distancing, and this time he means it, even if he’s said this multiple times now. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The story of Colleen and Ian Bock and the Acre, the restaurant in Ridgewood she was almost ready to open right when everything went to hell. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Advocates are hoping to see one million New Yorkers participate in today’s rent strike, hoping to put pressure on the governor to take immediate action for rent relief and prevent evictions down the line. (Davin Gannon for 6sqt)

The city is distributing 100,000 free face coverings in parks across all five boroughs, starting as early as this weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Disability Rights New York is suing the governor for not including an American Sign Language interpreter at his daily press conferences. The governor’s office responded that ASL versions of the daily press conferences are available on the web. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

The city’s Small Business Services has issued $8 million in loans to small businesses but is disproportionately providing 66% of the available loans to Manhattan businesses. Businesses in the Bronx have received $80,000 in loans, only 1%, but has seen 23% of the city’s positive COVID-19 tests. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you have a car that you haven’t used in a while, maybe it’s time to check the engine for rat colony. (Caity Weaver for NY Times)

Farewell to the USNS Comfort, which treated 182 COVID-19 patients while it was in New York. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

IKEA is working with the Queens Borough Presidents’s office to donate about 14,000 products to Queens-based non-profits and shelters. (Michael Gordan for Queens Post)

School food service employees, who are doing the work to distribute millions of meals to NYC, say they’re not adequately protected or acknowledged for their exposure to the public. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

An Illinois woman was arrested in Manhattan carrying 18 knives and other weapons in her vehicle after she allegedly threatened Joe Biden, and Hillary Clinton. Jessica Prim, who goes by Kimita Steel online, was broadcasting on Facebook Live when she was arrested by the Secret Service, spouting QAnon bullshit conspiracy theories and headed towards the USNS Comfort. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“I am eligible,” declares a governor to all Cuomosexuals. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deep and leveled look at what makes it so difficult for the city’s messaging about staying safe and social distancing to penetrate the Hasidic and Ultra-Orthodox communities and why de Blasio’s singling them out publicly in the manner that he did only stands to make the problem worse. (Elad Nehorai for HuffPost)

The photographers who are capturing an empty New York City, creating a powerful and eerie set of images we never thought we’d see. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Are you one of the New Yorkers re-creating famous book covers inside your home? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to get affordable takeout. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 26, 2020 – The “Plenty of Dogs and Cats to Adopt” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Elmhurst hospital is overwhelmed with COVID-19, Jumaane Williams calls for full lockdown, the MTA is losing $125 million a week, and more

Are you hiring? I’m working with the skint to help surface jobs in New York for New Yorkers. If you’re hiring or know someone who is, please pass this link along to them.


Today – Low: 47˚ High: 54˚
Clear throughout the day.

PDF Guide: Know Your Rights Guide for Transgender New Yorkers Navigating COVID-19 (Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund)

The only beds we’ve been able to free up are people who have died.” Elmhurst Hospital in Queens is the center of NYC’s COVID-19 crisis. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Video: The Times spent 72 hours following an emergency room doctor at Elmhurst hospital. (Robin Stein and Caroline Kim for NY Times)

A heartbreaking plea from Rachel Sobolev, an emergency medicine resident in the city, begging the president to take this pandemic more seriously. (Rachel Sobolev for HuffPost)

No matter what you read, New York City is not running out of pets to adopt. The Bloomberg story was changed after publication, and probably after most people read it, to say that it was referring to foster animals. There are still plenty of animals that are looking for a forever home. (Hilary Hanson for HuffPost)

If you’ve ever wondered why it seems to take forever for the city to do anything, here’s a perfect example. The city has been in the process of installing a protected bike lane on Sixth Ave for seven years. Community Board 5 requested a study in 2013 and approved the design in 2015. What’s the holdup now? The Department of Transportation wants another approval from CB5. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Governor Cuomo said on Wednesday that we may have made incremental progress on slowing the wave of coronavirus cases. This is not a reason to celebrate or to stop creating physical distance between you and anyone else, but it’s a sign that some of our shared sacrifices might be working. (Ben Verde for Gay City News)

New York, you’ve got the rest of the week to prove to the mayor that you can use playgrounds responsibly or he will close them all. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Photos: New Yorkers are not good at physical distancing. These are the people to blame. (Ben Yakas and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Between Hicks and Henry Streets in Brooklyn Heights, you’ll find Love Lane, the city’s possible original “Lover’s Lane” dating back to the 1800s. (Atlas Obscura)

From the discovery of dendritic cells to the cure for tuberculosis, 10 medical discoveries made in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A second Trader Joe’s was temporarily closed this week after a staffer tested positive for COVID-19. The closure of the Soho store will last at least three days while the store is sanitized. The Union Square store closed temporarily on Sunday and expects to reopen on Saturday. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Whole Foods is limiting the number of customers in its stores to 50, causing some mega lines outside the East Houston St store. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A look at Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman in the United States to receive a medical degree who created the first hospital run by and for women on Bleecker St. (Harry Bubbins for GVSHP)

Remembering the Happy Land social club fire of 1990 and how it changed New York. (Allison Gilbert for NY Times)

The Trickle Up” is a streaming service from performer and playwright Taylor Mac that charges subscribers $10 per month to access original performances from 50 different artists, with proceeds going to artists struggling financially. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The FDA approved a new potential COVID-19 treatment that takes blood plasma from people who have recovered from the virus and transfuses it into people suffering from the disease. The New York Blood Center will be the first in the country to collect blood for the treatment. (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Subway ridership is down 87%, buses are don 70%, Metro-North is down 91% and the LIRR is down 71%. The MTA is estimating its weekly losses at $125 million a week and that the federal bailout’s $4 billion might not be enough for the MTA to survive. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A Piece of Work” is a podcast tour of collection highlights at the Museum of Modern Art hosted by comedian and actor Abbi Jacobson. Listen, when it comes to “understanding” modern art, I’ll take all the help I can get. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Going through this crisis is enough, but imagine going through a divorce right now on top of everything. (Hannah Ingber for NY Times)

Photos: What life is like for a delivery person. (Ryan Christopher Jones and Amber Jamieson for BuzzFeed News)

With defendants accused of crimes now facing judges by video because of the coronavirus pandemic, the city’s court system no longer has a way of supervising the vast majority of suspects being released back into their communities. One of the many messes that COVID-19 is making that we’re all going to have to figure out how to fix after it’s over. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

We’re still early in the crisis and there are thousands of hourly workers across the city running out of time and money for multiple sectors of the economy that were abruptly shuttered. (Sydney Pereira and Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

RIP Terrence McNally, a playwright whose accolades and body of work is beyond what I could summarize here. (Andy Humm for Gay City News)

The city is sending homeless shelter residents and public hospital patients with coronavirus to hotels and officials aren’t providing hotel staff or the city employees monitoring the infected guests with protective equipment — instead instructing them to maintain social distance. The homeless shelter residents is a change in policy, prior to this they were sending them back to shelters. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Jumaane Williams, the city’s public advocate, is advocating for a “full lockdown” that would close parks and construction sites and ban New Yorkers from leaving their neighborhoods except for essential work. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Where to get pizza delivery in NYC. It’s a little light on suggestions in the outer boroughs, but it’s fun to remember when we used to be able to go places to do things. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to Lily from Hellgate Farm for today’s featured photo, which is allowing me to relax for a moment if I stare hard enough at it.