The Briefly for June 17, 2020 – The “Don’t Believe What Cops Say” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Playgrounds will open with phase 2, the mayor finally gets a coronavirus test, the AG’s hearing on NYPD interactions during protests, and more

Today – Low: 65˚ High: 74˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

You can watch the Public Hearing Via Video Conference on Police/Public Interactions During Recent Protests at that link at 11am on Wednesday.

Nine protesters detail their violent encounters with the NYPD. (Sydney Pereira, Jake Offenhartz, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Why the hell are NYPD cruisers playing ice cream man music? This isn’t an isolated incident and there is a video. (Luke Fater for Atlas Obscura)

The first wave of lawsuits against the NYPD has begun, with 18 notice of claims being lodged with City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office. (Reuven Blau for The City)

The lesson from yesterday’s story about the NYPD poisoning that never was is clear: Stop believing the police. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

The moment is demanding it, but is the NYPD capable of reform? (Nate File for Bedford + Bowery)

A new policy mandates that body cam footage when the NYPD’s weapons are fired. I hope we’re all ready for a million reasons why cameras “malfunction.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The 1.8 acre 50 Kent pop-up park will open on July 9 on a part-time basis from Thursday to Sunday from 10am to 6pm. (Greenpointers)

Mayor de Blasio announced that playgrounds will reopen in the city’s second phase of reopening. Yeah, it sucks, but we’re all fighting that same anxiousness in service of a greater good. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

It hasn’t been confirmed that we’ll be hitting phase 2 on June 22, and if we don’t, it’s because of assholes like Dani Zoldan on the Upper West Side, who has been running comedy shows inside Stand Up NY, the comedy club he owns. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Oh, look, more assholes. State Senator Simcha Felder, Assemblyman Simcha Eichenstein, and Councilman Kalman Yeger decided their community in Midwood has had enough of being careful and used a grinder to open the chains keeping the Kolbert Playground closed. (Lindsay Tuchman for NY1)

When CMJ announced it was coming back, a virtual festival wasn’t what we pictured. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The stoop is the new bar. And the new restaurant. And everything else too. (Marie Solis for Gothamist)

A look at Dennin Winser’s hand-painted signs, which he’s offering for free for Black-owned businesses. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Sometimes a headline is perfect. A gay socialist could be the first LGBTQ person of color in the New York legislature. Get to know Jabari Brisport. (Molly Sprayregen for LGBTQ Nation)

Ahead of the June 23 primary, Attorney General Letitia James opened a hotline for election issues. If you haven’t applied for an absentee ballot already, you’ll be voting in person. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city is providing free air conditioners for eligible households this summer. There are a few different guidelines to qualify and it’s best to check before it starts getting unreasonably warm. (East New York News)

Someone hung a noose inside Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem. The Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Should you sign a new lease right now? Rents look like they might be on the decline through the end of the year. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Kudos to the MTA for their creative social distancing decals on the subway. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped Cities)

We’ve all seen photos of the Unisphere in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, but have you thought about it represents? It’s meant to be a celebration the start of the Space Age, symbolize the theme of the 1964 World’s Fair “Peace Through Understanding” and also a part of Robert Moses’s plans for New York City. (Lillia Paynch for Untapped New York)

Juneteenth isn’t a recognized holiday in New York, but we could be on the road to changing that. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Photos: What Michelin-starred restaurant takeout looks like. (Gary He for Eater)

This year’s 4th of July hot dog eating championship will happen without a crowd and will be in a secret location, leaving this the first year in a long time without the competition at the corner of Surf and Stillwell. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The U.S. Open tennis tournament will also be held without a crowd this summer. I hope they fill the stands with stuffed animals and sex dolls like the Korean baseball teams have. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Hospitals and group homes can now accept visitors with their discretion. (Emily Davenport for Gothamist)

Housing courts in the state are starting to reopen, but there’s some confusion over if evictions are allowed to resume. With no additional guidance, Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks’s order from March halting evictions stands, but with pushback from eviction-hungry attorneys and landlords. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The state and city government is trying to get anyone who thinks they’ve been exposed to Covid-19 to get tested. If that’s the case, why were less than 100 prisoners tested over the first two weeks of June? (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Never trust the first thing Mayor de Blasio says. After taking a sick day on Monday and spreading the message that he didn’t feel there was a need to get tested… he got tested. Everything de Blasio says is a three-day story. Day One: Thing happens. day Two: Mayor says something stupid, ruining credibility. Day Three: Mayor backtracks, becomes joke. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A conversation with Judd Apatow about his new film “The King of Staten Island.” (Molly Given for amNewYork Metro)

The Briefly for April 22, 2020 – The “Someone Has to Be the Bad Roommate, Is It You?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo meets with Trump, City Council will force the mayor’s hand with opening up streets, the best Chinese takeout options, and more

Today – Low: 39˚ High: 50˚
Clear throughout the day.

Looking back to the first-ever subway, which went one block from Murray St to Warren St and was powered by compressed air. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Looking forward to the reopening of the city, Mayor de Blasio says temperature checks will likely be required to get things moving again. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Which roommate is the bad roommate? Check the list of dos and don’ts. Is it you? (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio gets driven from the Upper East Side to Prospect Park to take a walk every day, yet he can’t see the value of giving public space like streets to pedestrians and cyclists when car traffic has been reduced 60%. On Earth Day, the City Council is ready to introduce a bill that will force his hand and give 75 miles of streets back to the people. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The City Council will introduce a COVID-19 relief package on Wednesday that extends the eviction moratorium for those affected by the coronavirus crisis until April 2021. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Sometimes you just want to read a list. 10 famous people that lived in the Bronx. (Alex Mitchell for amNewyork Metro)

Williamsburg is the home of White Fox Scooters, the city’s first docked electric scooter sharing service. It works like CitiBike, where you’ll have to return the scooters to a dock, instead of leaving them wherever. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Do you remember when grocery shopping was fun? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

When this is all over, whenever that will be, the city will hold a ticker-tape parade for our healthcare workers and first responders. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

10 of the most luxurious bathrooms for sale right now. The rest of the apartments are for sale too. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The city’s Hasidic communities are some of the hardest hit by COVID-19, for a series of reasons that made it the perfect place for the virus to spread, including a high poverty rate, religious leaders who were slow to act, a distrust of authority, and a refusal to shut down and socially distance like the rest of the city. (Liam Stack for NY Times)

The non-profit Spaceworks in Gowanus will be shutting down in mid-June, forcing 28 artists to vacate their spaces mid-outbreak. Gowanus has been losing art spaces as a high rate as the neighborhood slowly turns over to more and more residential buildings. The artists are protected under Governor Cuomo’s ban on evictions, but that is set to run out on June 20, unless renewed. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The UCB Theatre in Hell’s Kitchen and UCB Training Center on 8th Avenue will both permanently close. UCB will push forward once the city reopens with shows and classes in different venues throughout the city. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The lawn at Bryant Park has been mowed in the shape of a heart in tribute to the city’s first responders and essential workers. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Can you move during the COVID-19 epidemic? Yes, here’s how. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

A 420 part on 4/20 busted by the NYPD at 4:20. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The de Blasio administration has missed its own deadline for transferring roughly 2,500 homeless people to hotel rooms to help limit the spread of COVID-19. Good to know that as everything seems to be changing around us, we can rely on the de Blasio administration to fall short of their own self-imposed deadlines. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Tuesday’s meeting between Governor Cuomo and President Trump was described as civil and productive, as the Governor said the city no longer needs the USNS Comfort but does need tens of thousands of COVID-19 tests. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Where to order take out and delivery in Sunset Park. (Ellie Plass for BKLYNER)

The best NYC street art inspired by our surreal times. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

For Wonderville, a bar in Bushwick displaying and celebrating locally-made arcade games, moving events into the world of Minecraft makes perfect sense. (Serena Tara for Bedford + Bowery)

24 of the top Chinese restaurants still open. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Elizabeth for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 17, 2020 – The “Every Hour is Happy Hour When Time is Meaningless” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city’s budget goes wartime, the best brunch options for delivery, high end stores are boarding up their windows, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 51˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 41˚ High: 63˚

4K VIdeo: Walking through Times Square. (ActionKid)

In honor of his late grandmother, Michael Che will be paying May’s rent for the 160 apartments in the NYCHA building where she lived. (Ron Dicker for HuffPost)

Rent in the city dropped 6% since the start since March 22. (Localize.City)

Tenant groups are set for a rent strike on May 1. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Sick of sourdough? Here are seven bread options for you to try. (Sam O’Brien for Atlas Obscura)

The allure and anxiety of drinking along in quarantine. (Alice Feriring for Grub Street)

What time is it okay to start drinking alcohol? It’s hard to tell because time has no meaning anymore. (Shayla Love for VICE)

Slowly, the city’s government is finding a way to move forward. The City Council and the Landmarks Preservation Commission will start meeting digitally next week. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Taxi drivers were struggling before the pandemic. With COVID-19, they face even more difficulties. (Estefania Hernandez for NY1)

Are you willing to go to a live sport without a vaccine? 61% of sports fans and 71% of people overall are unwilling to go until there’s a vaccine. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Keith McNally’s Lucky Strike on Grand Street is closed for good. Is it the first domino to fall when it comes to independent restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

From former Roberta’s and Speedy Romeo chef Robert Guimond comes Public Display of Affection, a wood-fired pizza spot in Park Slope on Union Street. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio released a revised “wartime” budget on Thursday, with a $6 billion reduction. “A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor when speaking about his budget. Last year he said, “Placard abuse erodes faith in government and has no place in our city.” This year he’s eliminating the Placard Abuse Enforcement Team. Activist Charles Komanoff has a different idea: Disband the Collision Investigation Squad instead. (Charles Komanoff for Streetsblog)

Workers at two luxury Manhattan residential buildings, The Chamberlain and 432 West 52nd Street, walked out on the job, claiming poor work conditions and harassment. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan for The Real Deal)

It’s easy to think that artists should use this time to create something new, but the reality of the moment can be much heavier than imaginable. This is Rori Nogee’s story of going from having six jobs and a show ready to open on Restaurant Row to a 100% loss of income and opportunities. (Rori Nogee for New York Cliche)

A look at what might be New York City’s last open bookstore. (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

I first saw it from a friend’s story on Instagram, the boarded-up stores in Manhattan. It’s a pandemic, not The Purge. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Pizza bagels? Pizza rolls? Please. Forget it, now pizza cupcakes are ready for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Tired of the same old views? Check out the livestreams of the Bronx Zoo and the New York Aquarium. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

“It should be stated bluntly that traveling on the New York subway system is now one of the more frightful experiences Western civilization has to offer on a regular basis. The experience is not only intolerable. It is also a daily advertisement for the brutish sensibilities and shallow brainpans of the people who now control the city.” “Why We Hate the Subways,” despite being timely, was written in 1977. (Alexander Cockburn for Village Voice)

Thank goodness for people like the non-profit Greenpoint Cats, who have been doing their best to look after bodega cats left behind or abandoned as bodegas close. (Aaron Simon for Greenpointers)

10 great sandwiches still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Police are investigating the death of a man who was found floating in the East River near Roosevelt Island. (Emily Davenpont for QNS)

New York remains on PAUSE until at least May 15. (Kathleen Culliton for PAtch)

Reports of domestic violence have dropped dramatically across the city, and that’s not a good thing. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

Watch New Yorkers sing “New York, New York” out their windows after Thursday’s 7 pm clap, a project of the Peace of Heart Choir. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

In what started as a cheap way to live, an $800-a-month illegal bedroom in Bushwick with no windows now sounds more like a cruel experiment. (Trey Taylor for Curbed)

Do you miss Shake Shack? Here’s the recipe for the ShackBurger and ShackSauce. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The best brunch options in NYC available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)