The Briefly for January 14, 2020 – The “AOC vs Cuomo, Round 2” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The AG looks at the NYPD’s subway fare evasion, how Tiffany’s moved hundreds of millions in jewlery, the head of Brooklyn’s democrats resigns, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 48˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

How do you move hundreds of millions of dollars in view of the public in NYC without getting robbed? Very carefully. Here’s the story of how Tiffany’s moved everything in its store overnight. (James Barron for NY Times)

Attorney General Letitia James announced on Monday that her office would investigate the NYPD and if its fare evasion policing in the subways has illegally targeted New Yorkers of color. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The winners and losers of the Queens bus network redesign. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Cuomo’s AirTrain is about to hit a new obstacle: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

There are thirteen million registered voters in New York state, with one million designated as “inactive,” and whose names were not on the voter rolls at election sites, which is a violation of the 14th Amendment and the National Voting Rights Act of 1993 according to a federal judge. While it may seem trivial, remember that the Queens DA race was decided by 55 votes. Moving forward, all registered voters’ names will be available at polling sites. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Information on how to register to vote.

The leader of the Brooklyn Democratic Party, Frank Seddio, is stepping down amid concerns about the party’s and his own finances. Seddio is facing $2.2 million in lawsuits and the party’s cash reserves have dwindled from $505,000 in 2013 to $32,800 in 2019. (Aidan Graham and Kevin Duggan for amNewYorkMetro)

Photos: When it comes to the city’s skies, birds usually get all the attention. Don’t forget the city’s bats. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

RIP Matthew Maher, owner of McSorley’s since the 60s. The bar is staying in the family, daughter Teresa Maher de a Haba is the owner now. (EV Grieve)

Here are the top ten checked out books in the NYPL’s history. You’ll notice a theme running through the list. “Goodnight Moon” did not make the list do to a personal vendetta against the book by children’s librarian Anne Carroll Moore. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Have you seen “The Geographic Center of NYC” in Woodside on the corner of 58th Street and Queens Boulevard? Besides being a cool piece of trivia it’s also completely wrong. If this isn’t the place, where is it? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

If your usual subway station is outdoors, the winters can be brutal. A century ago, the IRT provided potbelly stoves in stations for its riders to stay warm while waiting for the train. (Ephemeral New York)

Signal problems ruined about four out of every five morning commutes in 2019, according to a new Riders Alliance analysis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The L train showdown is running ahead of schedule and should be completed by April, but not without some weekend closures. The MTA announced the weekends of January 17, February 14, and March 20 with closures from 8th Av to Broadway Junction. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

In addition to the L construction, the MTA announced emergency overnight construction was necessary on the G train this week through Friday night from midnight to 1:30am. (Greenpointers)

On a dry day, the MTA pumps 13 million gallons of water from its system. Monday’s water main break added half a million gallons to that, causing chaos on the 4, 5, 6, A, B, and C lines. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s time to declare the days of the cooking competition celebrity chef over. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It started as an argument between two dads about their kids near Dyker Park, but it turned into a double stabbing. One was stabbed in the chest and neck and the other was stabbed in the leg. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

In terms of housing and transportation costs, NYC ranks tenth in the nation, right after Houston but right before Minneapolis-St Paul. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Baby Yoda has a mural in the East Village. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The plan to rezone Bushwick hit a possibly fatal roadblock Monday after city officials and local politicians failed to reach an agreement on affordable housing requirements. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The de Blasio administration testified at a 2019 City Council meeting that they did not have information about who was riding the heavily subsidized NYC Ferry system. The mayor used his insistence that the boats were being used by low-income New Yorkers as justification to dramatically expand the ferry system. It was all a lie, because the city’s Economic Development Corporation had already conducted two rider surveys that showed the median income of riders was over $100,000. For each rider on the ferry that pays $2.75, the city pays $9.34. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Vans opened Skate Space 198, a free indoor skatepark right off the Jefferson stop in Bushwick. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYCHA residents filed about 59,770 bug infestation complaints in the first nine months of 2019, according to the Legal Aid Society. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What’s the best pizza in NYC? In honor of National Pizza Week, Patch asked politicians, comedians, and Broadway stars where to get their favorite slice. It’s mostly unconventional picks for the city’s best, even if Chuck Schumer’s pick is one of the closest pizza places to his apartment. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mama’s Too, on the list, is rolling out a meatball parm that is already being described as “the city’s best meatball parm.” (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The Briefly for December 16, 2019 – The “A Bathroom Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD’s secret gang database isn’t going anywhere, the fate of electric bikes and scooters hangs in the balance, the best new restaurants of 2019, & more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 37˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.

Late night disruptions are headed to the 7, A, F, J, and Q trains this week. Check the trains before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

From the inspiration wall to the sprinkle pool, a look inside the Museum of Ice Cream, which opened over the weekend. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Tenants in two Upper East Side NYCHA developments are suing to correct years of neglect and pervasive dysfunction, which were estimated to be at $100 million in 2017. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A bathroom grows in Bushwick. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The de Blasio administration has reached a deal with homeless advocates and City Council members to require certain developers receiving city funding to set aside 15 percent of their new rental units for homeless New Yorkers. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Check out the anti-slavery landmark interactive story map from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

This one’s worded a little weird. The headline is “areas that weren’t a thing 10 years ago,” and I’d argue that Gowanus or the Brooklyn Navy Yard existed, but they weren’t real estate hot spots. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The NYPD keeps a secret database of somewhere between 17,500 and 37,000 people, called the “Criminal Group Database.” There’s no evidence why you are included or how to get off it. The gang database is the target of the “Erase the Database” campaign, but the new NYPD commissioner and the mayor are both staunch supporters of it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A 13-year-old boy was arrested and charged in connection to the fatal stabbing of 18-year-old Barnard student Tessa Majors. The NYPD believes two additional people were involved in the stabbing. (Michael Gold, Jan Ransom and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

The sense of safety that Morningside Park, which separates Columbia University from Harlem, has carried is recent years has changed with 20 robberies this year and punctuated with Tessa Majors’ murder. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

There’s a rumor that an abandoned train car with bullet-proof armor under the Waldorf Astoria was used by FDR to transport his limousine. While Baggage Car 002, the train car in question, wasn’t FDR’s, Track 61 has been used to move presidents and other government officials in and out of the Waldorf from the 30s through 2017. Baggage Car 002 is now at the Danbury Railway Museum. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Photos: Inside the Schitt’s Creek pop-up shop. (Jen Carlson, photos by Scott Lynch for Gothamist

Manhattan’s “bad cops list” has been released. DA Cyrus Vance released the list of NYPD officers with credibility problems in court thanks to a Freedom of Information request from WNYC/Gothamist. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

The Department of Transportation is turning to a new tactic with a series of Vision Zero ads targeting drivers: shame. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: More from the inside of the Museum of Ice Cream. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Jazmine Headley reached a $625,000 settlement with the city for the “formative incident of trauma” when her child was ripped from her during an arrest inside a assistance center. She was arrested for sitting on the floor and spend four nights in Rikers Island. Her arrest was caught on video and went viral. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s struggling actors have a new side hustle. Say goodbye to actor-waiters and say hello to actor-spin instructors. (Jae Thomas for Bedford + Bowery)

Governor Cuomo has a bill to legalize electric bikes and scooters, but there is no sign that he will sign it. (Zack Finn for NY1)

A look at the gossip inside the Gambino crime family, following the murder to the reputed underboss Francesco Cali in March. (Nicole Hong for NY Times)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and Mayor Bill de Blasio say the NYPD’s arrest rate is “high” for hate crimes. The number is 42%. (Samir Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Governor Cuomo is looking to prevent people from getting a New York gun license if they have committed a serious crime in another state, including misdemeanors like forcible touching and other sex offenses. This is the first public proposal that will be outlined in his 2020 state of the state speech. (amNewYork)

The MTA rolled out its first all-electric articulated bus on Sunday, one of a new fleet that is part of the agency’s plan to shift away from diesel-powered buses in the years ahead. Articulated buses are double the length of a normal bus. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

The best new restaurants of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 19, 2019 – The “Is The Rent Finally Too Damn High?” Edition

No one buys Bloomberg’s remorse, the opening of the new Milk Bar, Midtown BINGO, what to do if you find a coyote in Central Park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A Midtown BINGO card, to make going to Midtown only slightly less terrible. (Gothamist)

There are signs that, to quote Jimmy McMillan, “the rent is too damn high.” The volume of apartments for rent has increased for the fourth month in a row, raising the vacancy rate across the city. (amNewYork)

Got 100 years? That’s all it’ll take the average New Yorker to save up enough money to buy a home here. (Patch)

Chef Amanda Cohen, best known for Dirt Candy on the LES, is unveiling Lekka, a new restaurant. The main event is a new veggie burger. The entire restaurant, including the name, has a South African influence. Lekka opens today. (Grub Street)

The globes on the Manhattan Bridge are coming back as part of a $75.9 million rehabilitation of the bridge. (Untapped New York)

Video: One of the three new Staten Island ferries getting launched into the water. The first is expected in the city in August. (Untapped New York)

The MTA is not known for being gentle, and their work in the 86th Street R station in Bay Ridge is no exception. Renovations have damaged the station’s historic tile work, which dates back over a century. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Martin McDonagh’s dark drama about a British executioner “Hangmen” is coming to Broadway with previews in February. “Hangmen” won the Olivier Award for best new play in 2016 in London. (NY Times)

No one is buying Michael Bloomberg’s “remorse” over stop-and-frisk. (The Root)

Holiday pop-up bar season has come for us all. (Eater)

Here come the holiday markets. (6sqft)

There’s a parent-led concerted effort going on in District 15 to integrate their middle schools and the results are encouraging. District 15 covers Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, Sunset Park, Cobble Hill and Windsor Terrace. (Gothamist)

Don’t believe the NY Post when it comes to the city’s supervised release program. Despite the headlines, the city doesn’t give everyone “gift cards, cell phones, and Mets tickets.” The supervised release program is in place to help ensure people make their court dates, and appearances have held steady at 88% when intake has increased over 50%. Pretty good track record. (Gothamist)

The Playboy Club is dead and changing into the Live Nation Theater at Cachet Hotel. Turns out not many people were interested in a $100,000 membership. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The boyhood home of Donald Trump was for sale in an auction and no one bid on it. Maybe if everyone puts in money we can buy it and throw a sledgehammer party to demolish it. (6sqft)

In tribute to the Diamond District, which sits on W 47th between Fifth and Sixth, “one of the last New York blocks left in Manhattan.” (Gothamist)

After being pressured to leave Bed-Stuy, Charlotte Taillor’s BDSM Collective and Domination School Taillor Group has settled into their home in Bushwick to host kink/BDSM workshops, self-defense classes, and private sessions, all of it legal. (Bushwick Daily)

Photos: Opening day at the new flagship Milk Bar, including the “neon hallway.” (Gothamist)

Public Advocate Jumaane Williams told the City Council’s Public Safety Committee Monday that they should pass a bill mandating the public release of NYPD body camera footage. (amNewYork)

Esquire’s list of the best new restaurants in America for 2019 is out and it includes NYC’s Rezdôra, Kawi, Oddo, Wayan, and Red Hook Tavern. (Patch)

The city is making a big push to offer services to the homeless in Outreach NYC, but the program is being met with skepticism. Yes, the outreach is improving, but the shelter system itself still has all of its own problems. (Gothamist)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden unveiled its new Robert W. Wilson Overlook, which gives viewers a sweeping view of the Cherry Esplanade. (Curbed)

There have been more and more coyote sightings in Central Park. If you come across one, stay calm and try to avoid it. If it comes up to you, try to make yourself look bigger and make loud noises until it retreats. (Gothamist)

Pot arrests have dropped dramatically in the city, but the people arrested are still predominantly black and Hispanic, making up 90 percent of arrests last quarter. OF the 260 people arrested for possession, less than 20 were white. (Patch)

Ben Kallos, running for Manhattan Borough president, got a cease and desist from Marvel Comics for dressing up like Captain America in a recent political mailer. (Patch)

The death of 25-year-old Brooklynite Ola Salem, found in a wooded area of a Staten Island park, was ruled a homicide. (Gothamist)

The MTA is planning to renovate the 52nd Street, 61st Street, 69th, 82nd, 103st and 111th Street stations along the 7 line with renovations getting started in the second half of next year. (Jackson Heights Post)

The best burgers in the Upper West Side. (I Love The Upper West Side)