The Briefly for May 9, 2019 – The “Is This Where They Dump the Bodies on Law & Order?” Edition

The NYPD’s use of chokeholds continues, there has been no state movement on legal marijuana, a boozy Taco Bell in the West Village, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The City Council pass a legislative package with 17 bills aimed at protecting tenants’ rights. (amNY)

The hunt for the city’s best cheesecake. (Grub Street)

We are six weeks away from the second 2019 deadline for the state’s legislature to do something about legalizing recreational marijuana. In order to make it work, the governor is going to have to start throwing his weight around. (Gothamist)

New York is often shaped in the minds of visitors by the shows and movies that portray it. From the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to Seinfeld to Law and Order, every non-New Yorker’s New York is an imaginary city. (Curbed)

The life of a polyamourous Hasidic swordfighter in, yes, how did you know, Bushwick. (Bushwick)

The top 10 secrets of Barnard College. (Untaped Cities)

“All of the pre-made food looks so sad.” The reviews of the city’s Amazon Go store are in. (Gothamist)

The NYPD spent $35 million trying to retrain officers after Eric Garner died a chokehold. Record show that chokeholds are still being used by NYPD officers, very few face discipline, some have lost vacation time, and none have been fired. (NY Times)

Is the West Village ready for a boozy Taco Bell? (Commercial Observer)

Don’t pet the dog. All the things you’ve never asked commuters with service dogs and what they want you to know. (Gothamist)

M & S Schmalberg, the makers of silk flowers for over a century, gets the NY Times profile treatment. (NY Times)

The Prospect Park Perimeter is getting a new bike lane along Ocean Ave. (6sqft)

On an intersection, just one block from the Brooklyn Museum, the rats have begun a hostile takeover. (Gothamist)

28 portraits of this year’s Tony nominees. (NY Times)

176 pounds of cocaine was seized, worth nearly $3 million, in the city’s recent drug bust that resulted in 19 arrests. (Patch)

In New York State, you can be arrested for not paying a parking ticket, which becomes part of your criminal record. State lawmakers are looking to change that. (NY Times)

No keys? No way. Hell’s Kitchen tenants sued and won the rights to have physical keys for their apartments after a landlord installed a keyless entry system that they claimed violated their right to privacy. (Gothamist)

If you’ve wondered but have been too scared to ask where the Museum Mile is or what’s a part of it, this Miracle Mile guide is your answer. (NYCGo)

New York City is the second worst place to work if you don’t have at least a bachelor’s degree. (Patch)

In praise of the ten-egg breakfast. (Grub Street)

The New York Times reviews The Met’s ‘Camp,’ calling it “Frustrating.” (NY Times)

The city is looking at banning “ghost” guns. Not the Ghostbusters’ proton packs, but gun frames to which other components attach to. They lack serial numbers, don’t require background checks and would allow you to build an untraceable gun. (Gothamist)

From Fox and Friends to Famiglia Pizza: The lowlights of NYC: Donald Trump’s New York. (Huff Post)

13 places to have post afternoon tea in NYC. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 7, 2019 – The “Would You Jump in the East River to Save a Dog?” Edition

The #RethinkLinkNYC campaign, the Met Gala, the target on de Blasio’s back, the Kosciuszko Bridge is ahead of schedule, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Riad Nasr and Lee Hanson’s Frenchette in TriBeCa was awarded the James Beard award for Best New Restaurant. (NY Times)

While the good people of New York City, his friends, and anyone with common sense don’t want Mayor Bill de Blasio to run for president, he is none of those people. Even if he does make the decision, his questionable fund-raising tactics, and the subsequent investigations into them will be the first speed bump on his way to not becoming president. (NY Times)

While the Rethink LinkNYC campaign isn’t throwing bricks at the LinkNYC kiosks, it is educating pedestrians about the three cameras that are always recording and the questionable nature of who can access those images. (EV Grieve)

The trade for the LinkNYC kiosks is supposed to be revenue for the city, right? The 55-inch screens across the 1,800 kiosks will fall $34 million below projections for the first five years of the program. (Gotham Gazette)

High drama in the East River as a local hero jumped off a pier to save a dog who decided to take an unannounced swim. (Gothamist)

Photos from the 2019 Met Gala. (NY Times)

Here’s a rundown of the nine bills advocates are pushing forward in the state legislature that, when packaged together, are termed “universal rent control.” (The Indypendent)

A look at the After Hours Project, a community-based syringe exchange and harm reduction program, a social and mental health services provider, an opioid treatment facility and provides additional services as well. (Bushwick Daily)

The most beautiful places to get married in the city. (Curbed)

The city’s first new marina in fifty years will be in Brooklyn Bridge Park. The ONE˚15 marina will house over 100 boats up to 200 feet in length. (6sqft)

Housing 20,000 bees on the roof of The Shops at Fresh Meadows is, as the original headline explains “best for bees-ness“. (QNS)

Five of the most unusual places in Brooklyn. Make your own jokes. (Untapped Cities)

Add this to your nightmare file: A 22-year-old woman fell from her apartment’s roof on East 25th Street while taking photos of the skyline. She’s alive, partially because she landed in the building’s trash area. (Gothamist)

NIMBYs, they’re everywhere! Park Slopers say the city wants to “pit the working class people of this city against the homeless,” due to plans to partner with a nonprofit shelter to provide 253 apartments for homeless New Yorkers. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look back twenty years ago at Giuliani’s administration “of, for, and by white people.” (Village

The plans for four “neighborhood” jails that will replace Riker’s Island will each be reduced by at least 10% to better integrate the buildings to the neighborhoods that will be housed in. The number of inmates is currently around 7,400 but is expected to drop to 4,000 by 2027. (The City)

Manhattan and Brooklyn are among the fourth and seventh most bike-friendly places in the country, according to PropleForBikes’ second annual city ratings report. (Curbed)

One of the joys of warm weather in the city is discovering how many places use goats to cut their grass. Add Riverside Park to the list, as 24 goats will “work” through August 30 between 119th and 125th Streets. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Patch is on the allergies in the city beat, showing the next week is going to be particularly rough for those of us who feel personally attacked by the city’s flora. (Patch)

There are a lot of stories about how Louis CK is not allowing people to record any of his material without his consent, which is tragically funny on one hand, but on the other hand, do not go to see Louis CK perform comedy. This city is full of hundreds, if not thousands, of comedians. (BrooklynVegan)

Three-year-old Zoey Pereira’s death is being investigated as a homicide. Her father was seen running from a car which burst into flames, which had been chained shut with two gas canisters and a propane tank in the trunk. Her father was taken into custody for questioning. (NY Times)

Add the Macy’s Fourth of July fireworks to the list of things which aren’t coming to Long Island City. The Brooklyn Bridge was chosen as this year’s location. (LIC Post)

Farewell to the original Essex Market, which is officially closed after 79 years. (Bedford + Bowery)

The Kosciuszko Bridge’s second span will open in September, years ahead of schedule. No specific opening date was set. (amNY)

How does a street pretzel compare to an authentic German Bretzel? (Viewing NYC)

The Durst Organization is lobbying the city to add a new NYC Ferry line between Astoria and the Upper East Side. This might have to do with the seven residential towers the organization is opening in Astoria. (Curbed)

14th Street’s The Blind Pig will be closing on May 18 after the landlord imposed a 50% rent hike. The site is currently listed at $300,000/month. (EV Grieve)

From a 1970 bedroom to throwing axes, from secret rooms to Oscar Wilde, 15 unique bars in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 6, 2019 – The “Oh No, He’s Actually Going to Run for President, Isn’t He” Edition

The mayor’s Vision Zero program is beginning to fail, the best tacos, Jagged Little Pill plans to bring people to theaters, teens attacked by acid, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes and diversions are minimally awful. (Subway Changes)

A review of Decade of Fire, playing at the Metrograph, which tackles the topic of the burning of the Bronx in the 70s and the organizations that rallied to rebuild when no one else would. (Curbed)

Oh god. He’s actually going to run for President, isn’t he? (Splinter)

How to spend 12 hours on Governors Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Jagged Little Pill, which may actually be a bad album, is coming to Broadway on November 3 at the Broadhurst Theatre. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The 10 oldest libraries in the city and their secret histories. (Untapped Cities)

Some teens threw a raucous party in the basement of an NYCHA development. The party ended when someone poured an acid-like liquid onto them from above. (NY Times)

Some people are happy with laundry machines in their building. Others get a million dollar yacht, who Rolls-Royces, a Lamborghini, a Hamptons house rental for a summer, and courtside Nets season tickets. Yes, all of those amenities are for one apartment. Welcome to the wildest luxuries for city homes. (Patch)

RIP Lew Fidler. Fidler was a Brooklyn politician, who was a champion for homeless youth in the city council, the environment, and LGBTQ youth. (Politico)

The top twelve brunch spots in the city. Let this serve as a reminder if you want to go anywhere for brunch this weekend. Mother’s Day approaches. (Patch)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants and bars. (amNY)

Scenes from the Union Square cannabis parade and rally from Saturday. (EV Grieve)

It took six years, but the Office of Emergency Management has unveiled lower Manhattan’s solution against a Hurricane Sandy-like storm has arrived. They’ll use… sandbags. Really big sandbags. This took six years. (NY Times)

Margaritaville is a state of mind, but it’s also going to be a resort on the corner of 40th and Seventh Ave. (New York YIMBY)

Katz’s has survived New York since 1888 and New Yorkers have survived Katz’s enormous sandwiches for just as long. I’ll have what she’s having. (Food Insider)

Mark your calendars, November 9 will be Wu-Tang Clan Day, and to celebrate you’ll be able to go to the corner of Targee Street and Vanderbilt Avenue in Staten Island, which is the Wu-Tang Clan District as of this weekend. (The Root)

RIP Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown, who died over the weekend due to Parkinson’s disease complications. Brown was the Queens District Attorney for nearly thirty years and had been on the judiciary since 1973, who had been on a leave of absence from the job since March. (QNS)

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, whose decisions are helping destroy the Amazon and whose racism, homophobia and bigotry tops any racist uncle you’ve got on Facebook, will skip the NYC gala in his honor after it had become clear that New Yorkers will tolerate a lot of punishment, but hosting him is a step too far. (NY Times)

Breathe easy, literally, if you take the L train, the first dust report is in and the concentration of silica dust is well below the benchmarks for dangerous exposure. (NY Times)

BreakfastClub founder and author of BREAKFAST: The Cookbook shares her favorite breakfasts in the city. (Time Out)

Where to have a graduation lunch or dinner. (The Infatuation)

It seems that Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero program has begun to fail. (amNY)

Youfeng Xu was killed crossing Seventh Avenue with the light in Sunset Park, the person behind the wheel of the truck was charged with failure to yield to a pedestrian and failure to exercise due care. (Streetsblog)

A three-year-old boy was killed while in a crosswalk in front of a stop sign by a van in Bath Beach last week on a street that the city has known to be dangerous for at least five years. The driver blamed the child’s death on his mother. (Gothamist)

Candy. Where do you get it? Anywhere? Wrong. You get it at Economy Candy. (ABC 7 NY)

Senior citizens outnumber millennials when it comes to renting apartments. (NY Times)

An ice cream parlor for humans and dogs. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

Here’s how New York’s proposed voter affiliation deadline change could help Bernie Sanders in the 2020 presidential election. (Gothamist)

35 outstanding tacos in NYC. (Eater)

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