The Briefly for March 28, 2019 – The “Everyone Flushes Their Dog’s Poop Down the Toilet, Right?” Edition

A bagel abomination, the NYPD fights new parking placard laws, the NYC James Beard Award finalists, no one wants to see more cops on buses, and more in today’s daily NYC news brief.

Here is an argument that Times Square is not the Gowanus Canal dining options and it is actually a good neighborhood for food. (Grub Street)

The latest bagel abomination is bagels sliced like loaves of bread instead of a sandwich. Arrest this man. (Gothamist)

The state and city’s Democrats have no love for the real estate industry. Can they successfully lobby the left to do their bidding? (The Real Deal)

The answer appears to be “yes.” The proposed pied-à-terre tax would affect 280 people, and in the face of opposition by the real estate industry, the state’s legislators have appeared to back down in favor of a transfer tax. The estimated difference in revenue is $250 million ($400 million for the transfer tax and vs $650 million for the pied-à-terre tax). A $250 million reduction for the benefit of 280 people. (Curbed)

You bring your dog’s poop home in bags and flush it down the toilet, right? Well, that’s what a deputy director at the Department of Sanitation thinks you should do. Legally, it is 100% legal to toss those poop bags in a public garbage can. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is seeking support (and signatures) in opposition of a rezoning that would cast a literal shadow over portions of the garden, causing irreparable harm to the plants. (bbg.org)

A truck driver hit and killed a cyclist in Midtown, the third driver from Approved Oil to kill a pedestrian or cyclist in two years. The driver allegedly fled the scene but was not charged with leaving the scene of a crash, which is a felony. (Gothamist)

Just when you thought a commute couldn’t get worse, a water main break caused 7th Avenue to close between 27th and 34th St. (NY Post)

NYC restaurants lost jobs (3.4%) for the first time in ten years in 2018. At the same time, the total number of restaurants increased by 2,000. (Eater)

The city’s 2019 James Beard Award finalists are in. Make your reservations while you still can. (Eater)

Time Out has some feelings about the list. (Time Out)

The city wants your feedback on these ideas for the Shirley Chisholm monument in Prospect Park. (amNY)

Yankees and vintage train fans have something to look forward to. Today’s home opener this year will be accompanied by a 102-year-old subway train bringing fans to the stadium on the 4 train. (6sqft)

Where to eat at Yankee Stadium. (Eater)

A new Grand Street Bridge will be complete by 2027. Now we just have to hope that the current span between Queens and Brooklyn will last that until then. (QNS)

Turns out no one wants cops on city buses enforcing everyone pay their fares. 75% of bus riders are people of color with a median income under $30k and advocates and politicians are see the idea of policing that specific demographic as racial profiling. (Streetsblog)

The death of one-year-old Darwin Gonzalez-Santana in December was ruled a homicide after fentanyl and heroin were found in his system. His father is not in police custody and his mother is already in custody for another offense. (NY Post)

Eight remnants of colonial NYC that you can still touch. (Untapped Cities)

For $25,000, you can dine (and attempt to influence) Governor Cuomo. Who needs campaign finance reform when it costs 19 ounces of gold to share a meal? (NY Times)

The review process for Mayor de Blasio’s Rikers Island alternative jail system is underway. (Bklyner)

Horrifically, someone fell face first onto the track of the L train in Brooklyn. Witnesses couldn’t get him off the tracks in time, but they were able to signal to the conductor to stop the train before he was run over. (Gothamist)

Mark your calendars, Fleet Week is May 22 – 28. (Gothamist)

Congestion pricing, explained. (Curbed)

If you don’t know what Williamsburg looked like in the 90s, you owe it to yourself to take a look at the neighborhood pre-hipster. (Bedford + Bowery)

The latest volley in the legal battle between the city and Ballyhoo Media, the operator of the floating LED billboards in the city’s waterways, is a lawsuit form the city with $25,000 fines for each day the city says Ballyhoo broke zoning rules. (Patch)

Mayor de Blasio said delivery workers who are caught using electric bikes won’t be directly targeted by legal action. The NYPD doesn’t care what he says. (Gothamist)

The socialite grifter’s lawyer has an interesting defense planned: She’s just like Sinatra. (NY Post)

The City Council has unlikely opposition in their quest to fight parking placard abuse: the NYPD. The city’s likely biggest abusers say that the job they’re doing is already top notch. (amNY)

TGI Friday’s, have you no shame? (NY Post)

An interview with Brittany Bond, the purveyor of Common Books, the pushcart bookstore that can be found in the Lower East Side year round. (Bowery Boogie)

A list of good places to break up with someone in public. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for January 3, 2019 – The “Who Are These People Waiting In Hour Long Lines for Pizza” Edition

The Ridgewood serial toilet theif may have been caught, Manhattan apartments dip below $1 million, EGG ROLL SQUIRREL, Times Square on the water and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Six ways that 2019 will change New York City. (Curbed)

The city outlaws the LED billboards that have been seen on barges surrounding Manhattan, but there has ben zero enforcement. Welcome to our waterways, the new Times Square. (Gothamist)

The NYPD has arrested Kwame Johnson, the man who allegedly groped a 4-year-old girl on the subway last week. He was charged with sex abuse, forcible touching, acting in a manner injurious to a child, menacing, and harassment. (NY Post)

After becoming the surprise first New York attorney general in history, Barbara Underwood is going back to her post as solicitor general under newly elected Letitia James. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Finally, someone does the things the rest of us only think about doing. Asking the tourists waiting in line for pizza in DUMBO “WHY?” (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio announced Julie Menin, the head of the city’s film and television office, will add the role of Census Director to oversee the city’s implementation of the 2020 census. (Daily News)

The Wendy’s in Ridgewood can rest easy knowing that Richard Mirabile, their alleged serial toilet thief, was arrested last week. (Bushwick Daily)

The deadly six-car accident in Tribeca last weekend was caused by a car going 100 mph. Sherman Harrison hit Amy Philipson’s car, which flipped and burst into flames, killing Philipson. (NY Post)

Yes, the Brooklyn Borough President took the Coney Island Polar Bear Plunge this year, but also when was the last time any borough had president with visible abs? (Bklyner)

Cancel everything. Watch this squirrel eating an egg roll. (Gothamist)

Webster Hall returns in the spring of this year. Hipsters, prepare your complaints about how much better it was before. (BrooklynVegan)

The new campaign finance laws will get their first test during February’s public advocate election. The public advocate’s office has a budget of $3.5 million and the Board of Elections estimates the cost of the elections at $15 million. (NY Post)

The best bathtub in the city can be yours for the low cost of $7,000 per night. (NY Times)

Step back in time into a 1970’s bar in Murray Hill, just don’t expect 1970’s prices. (Eater)

A Manhattan federal jury cleared NYPD officer James Grant of charges of trading favors for gifts, including cash, diamonds, and sex on an airplane with a prostitute. His co-defendant Jeremy Reichenberg was found guilty of bribery and conspiracy charges. (Gothamist)

The city/state rivalry is bubbling up with the MTA trolling the mayor for not announcing any details about the Fair Fares program. (NY Post)

The median price of an apartment in Manhattan just barely dipped below $1 million for the first time since 2015. (NY Times)

Subway traffic on the Williamsburg Bridge came to a complete stop on Wednesday night because a dog had found its way onto the tracks. The dog was safely rescued. (NY Post)

The NYPD’s crackdown on e-bikes has been anything but fair to restaurant delivery workers. A new directive will shift enforcement of the e-bike ban towards the business and not the individual. From January 2018 through October, the city’ issued 509 citations to individuals and only 204 to businesses. (Gothamist)

Where to eat when you’re trying to not spend money. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for November 26, 2018 – The “New York’s Foam Party is Ending” Edition

What we hate most about NYC living, not snow good plowing, the styrofoam ban, late night subway changes and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes include some of the MTA’s greatest hits like “There’s No L Train,” “What Happened to The F?,” “Why Isn’t The 7 Running.” and more. (Subway Weekender)

Say goodbye to styrofoam takeout containers, cups, packing peanuts, plates, bowls, and trays as the city’s foam ban goes into effect on January 1. (Gothamist)

Do you live in the suburbs? 18% of city-dwellers said they did. (The Real Deal)

A guide to the different types of Christmas trees. (amNY)

There’s a loophole in campaign finance laws in NY that allow LLCs to act like people and donate up to $65,100 to each statewide candidate. Will the Democrats, who publicly oppose the loophole, close it? (The Real Deal)

New York’s lawsuit against the Trump Foundation can proceed, according to Justice Saliann Scarpulla. (NY Times)

The things we hate most about living in the city. (NY Post)

The unbelievable story of a dog who escaped his home in Canarsie and turned up near Tampa, FL 18 months later. (NY Post)

The Carnegie Deli is back, but only for a week to celebrate the release of Amazon’s Marvelous Mrs. Maisel season 2. (Untapped Cities)

A naked, burned body was found by kids near a Staten Island Elementary school. The NYPD is treating the incident as a homicide. (NY Post)

The map and data that shows conclusively the city completely blew it when it came to plowing during the last snowstorm. (I Quant NY)

Citi Bike added 200 electric bikes to their NYC fleet, but their batteries haven’t been able to keep up with demand. (NY Post)

Lighting By Gregory has turned into $30 Million For Gregory. (Bowery Boogie)

NYC’s original elevated trains in 1868 moved between five and ten miles an hour, which is still faster than the average speed of a Manhattan bus.

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