The Briefly for December 6, 2019 – The “Your New Year’s Wishes Will Become Literal Trash” Weekend Edition

In today’s daily NYC digest: The weekend’s subway disruptions, coffee rat, Gambino family mobsters were caught for racketeering, the best unsing restaurants, and more

This weekend’s subways are a mess of fun, including a few suspensions. Better check before you go if you’re along the 4, 5, A, E, J, N, Q, and R trains. (Lance for Subway Weekender)

The owners of Luna Park in Coney Island are raising the rent on the independently owned businesses on the Riegelmann Boardwalk by 500% on January 1. On top of the rent, they also take 10% of the sales as well. It’s a greedy move by the largest lease-holder in Coney Island, who tried to evict all the businesses on the boardwalk in 2010. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The LinkNYC kiosks were supposed to by “a critical step toward a more equal, open, and connected city,” according to the mayor. Instead, they’re digital billboards, an additional form of surveillance, magnets for controversy, and of the 7,500 that were to be installed, only 1,774 are in operation. With less than 25% of the promised numbers actually delivered, they have done little to address the digital divide in the city. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

Spend a Sunday with Cheslie Kryst, Miss USA. (Tammy La Gorce for NY Times)

Your wishes for 2020 can become literal trash less than an hour into the new year. If you want to see your hopes and dreams end up in the sewer, you can submit a new year wish to be included on Times Square confetti in-person or online. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Is the MTA’s “Rockaway Parkway Station” an abbreviation or an amazing typo? (@clauirizarry)

Holiday windows in NYC you won’t want to miss. (Shaye Weaver for amNewYork)

Do you need to be reminded that fishing in the Gowanus Canal, a waterway whose water was nicknamed “Black Mayo,” is a bad idea? The answer is a surprising “yes,” because the city is adding more signs reminding people of the Superfund status of the canal. (Scott Unman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 421-a tax abatement program was meant to spur development and make home-owning less of a financial burden by temporarily lowering real estate tax bills, but that temporary financial relief is exactly that. Only temporary. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Real estate tax is tricky to begin with. On average Bronx and Staten Island homeowners have lower home values, but pay a higher percentage of the value of their homes compared to other boroughs. There are four classes of property that are all taxed differently and assessments vary. Reform is on the agenda for 2020. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

Meet Lauren Ashcraft, the 30-year-old democrat socialist challenging U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney for her seat in Congress. (Victoria Merlino for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“Jagged Little Pill” on Broadway is a Times Critic’s Pick. (Jesse Green for NY Times)

You might see headlines about how Di Fara Pizza will “deliver” its pizza for the first time. While it’s technically true, they are working with a company that ships food through the mail rather than locally. While it’s a fun gimmick to say that you can get a pizza from Di Fara “delivered” to your friend in Seattle, it’s also not the delivery you were looking for. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Who are the people clamoring for Blockbuster Video merchandise in 2019? Well, a pop-up on Soho is here for them to get their fix of a doomed business from the 90s. (Untapped New York)

The Sanitation Department have select the garbage cans of tomorrow, and they look like garbage cans. The cans of tomorrow will be seen on Fifth Ave near 90th St first before implemented more widely across the city. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A Target is coming to Times Square and it’s expected to open in 2022. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Kellogg’s NYC near Union Square, where for some reason you could get a bowl of cereal for $1.50, is closed. Miraculously, it was open for nearly two years. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Where to ice skate in the city. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s homeless relocation program has been under investigation since February for placing families in unsafe living conditions outside city limits. Newark is suing NYC in federal court for moving homeless families into Newark slums. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The NYPD has more tasers than ever, and it seems like they’re trigger-happy to use those tasers on people of color and the “emotionally disturbed” based on four years of complaints about improper use. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Today marks the release of the third season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. What would her classic-six apartment on Riverside Drive be worth today? (Emily McDonald for StreetEasy)

The filming locations of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: The Dyker Heights Christmas lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An explosion at an Amtrak facility in the Bronx has left one person dead and two people with minor injuries, according to the FDNY. (Elizabeth Kim and Andy Mai for Gothamist)

Congrats to everyone who posted photos of a viral milkshake to Instagram, you’ve participated in the dumbest food trend of the decade. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Okay, so now Coffee Rat is now a thing. Great. (Ben Kayas for Gothamist)

Are there still Gambino mobsters out there? Yes, because 12 of them, including their boss Andrew Campos, were arrested on racketeering and loan sharking charges on Thursday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Are you one of the 50,000 whose late fees to the New York Public Library were referred to a collections agency? (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Take a deep breath. There have been no reported Mandarin Duck sightings in a while and some pessimists have feared the worst. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Under their new contract, bus and subway workers would get a roughly 10% raise over the next four years. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Great New Year’s Eve restaurants that don’t require a tasting menu. (The Infatuation)

The ten best unsung restaurants from the Times’ Hungry City columnist. (Ligaya Michan for NY Times)

The Briefly for October 17, 2019 – The “Did 14th St Cause the Apocalypse?” Edition

A Halloween guide for dog lovers, New York can get around presidential pardons, 100 community gardens may close, the best Harlem restaurants, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

If you want to see dogs in Halloween costumes, this is your guide. (Gothamist)

There are more two-bedroom apartments available in Brooklyn than Manhattan. (StreetEasy)

Whoever is setting the Lower East Side Park port-a-potties on fire, stop it. (Patch)

The data is in and the 14th St busway did not cause the apocalypse. There was barely any change to the traffic on the surrounding streets. The study was conducted by the same people that found that the new Kosciuszko Bridge actually made traffic worse than before it was replaced. (Streetsblog)

The NYPD’s Hyun Kim, 25, was charged Saturday with two counts of menacing after pointing his gun at waitresses at a bar in Queens. (Gothamist)

A look inside the new TWA Hotel. (Forgotten New York)

Finally, a reason to go to Times Square! Check out the They Live-inspired billboard from Mitch “The World’s Best Artist” O’Connell at 7th Ave and 48th St. (Boing Boing)

With Mother Cabrini in the news so much, take a tour down Cabrini Blvd in Washington Heights. It’s not arbitrarily named, it’s where she was interred for many years. (Forgotten New York)

If you’re into meta museum exhibits, the Museum of the City of New York’s Cultivating Culture is for you, focusing on 34 museums. Here are ten treasures from the exhibit. (Untapped Cities)

It didn’t take long, but the mystery of how a man ended up dead under a manhole seems to have been solved. On September 30, the man walked through multiple safety barriers and fell in and workers closed it up two hours later, not knowing he was down there. (Gothamist)

The former Caffe Cino location is now NYC’s newest landmark. It’s considered to be the home of Off Off Broadway. It’s currently home to the bar The Drunken Monkey. It was one of the six LGBTQ landmarks considered this week from the NYC Landmarks Commission. (Untapped Cities)

Apple and Facebook are in a new competition, but this time it’s over office space in the post office building on 8th Ave. (The Real Deal)

Lose a chainsaw? They’ve got it for you at the Penn Station lost and found. (Gothamist)

Opinion: In support of ranked-choice voting. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Where to eat and drink with your dog. (The Infatuation)

Video: See the newest residents of the Bronx Zoo, a trio of dholes, which are adorable and endangered wild dogs named Roan, Apollo, and Kito. (Viewing NYC)

Audio: A real look at gentrification, using Bed-Stuy’s recent neighborhood changes as a backdrop. (Brooklyn Based)

NYPD sergeant Linhong Li is the 10th member of the NYPD to commit suicide in 2019. He died of a gunshot to the head in his home in Fresh Meadows. Four members died by suicide in 2018. (Gothamist)

The land use committee approved the Rikers replacement jails, clearing the way for a full City Council vote today. (Politico)

Does NYC’s affordable housing program go far enough? (Curbed)

Representatives Eliot Engel, Jerry Nadler, Carolyn Maloney, and Yvette Clarke are all subject of AOC-style challenges for their seats in 2020. (Politico)

There are 100 community gardens that are in danger of closing because of the Parks Department’s new GreenThumb policies that it is mandating gardens sign in order to remain open. Volunteer organizations that run the refusing gardens say the rules are onerous and make it unviable to run the spaces. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A new law in New York will allow the state to bring charges against anyone who receives a presidential pardon for related crimes, citing the Supreme Court’s decision that double jeopardy does not apply to the states’ ability to bring charges that were also tried federally. (Politico)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Village Halloween Parade. (curbed)

27 hit Harlem restaurants to try. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 12, 2019 – The “You’re A Landmark if You Like It or Not” Edition

The state’s legislature agreed to rent reforms, the best restaurants of 2019 so far, Cuomo gets serious about MTA overtime, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The state legislature agreed on a package of bills aimed at strengthening tenants rights and rent laws. The bills also would become permanent, so no more regular lobbying from the real estate industry to let the laws lapse when their expiration dates come. (NY Times)

Some of the rent reforms include ending vacancy decontrol, eliminating the ability of landlords to raise rents on vacancies, it would retain preferential rents for the life of a tenant, and dramatically limit improvement charges. (Politico)

Cool down with a look at the ice creams of Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

The Strand Bookstore is now a city landmark and as you might expect, despite a long campaign from owner Nancy Wyden against the idea. (Gothamist)

“My friend later told me that most of the businesses in this area dealt in cash only…so guns were pretty much everywhere…in every store.” New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Your regular reminder that you can check the city’s beaches for too much poop (how much poop is too much?) on the internet. (Gothamist)

If you’ve wanted to live in the Waldorf Astoria (and have more money than you know what to do with), the condos will be hitting the market this fall. (Curbed)

New York is the third most fun state in the country, behind Florida and California. The thing holding it back? It’s not the ratpocalypse or the mountains of trash on the sidewalks, it’s the high costs. (Patch)

Hundreds rallied after the death of Layleen Polanco in Rikers Island last week. She was being held and her bail was set at $500. The city is looking into the case, where she was sent into solitary confinement despite a history of seizures. (Gothamist)

Catch a sneak peek at NYC’s largest rainbow “flag”. (HuffPost)

The helicopter pilot who crashed into a building on Monday was lost in the rain and fog. Investigators are looking into how the craft ended up where it did instead of an airport in New Jersey. (NY Times)

FAA officials said that Timothy McCormack did not have the proper license to be operating the helicopter in low-visibility conditions. (HuffPost)

Congressmember Carolyn Maloney wants to ban all nonessential helicopter flights from Manhattan. The city banned rooftop helicopter landings after a 1977 crash on the roof of the MetLife building. (The Villager)

In the 1977 crash, five people were killed when an idling helicopter tipped over, four were on the roof, one was on the street below. (Gothamist)

The High Line’s final section is open. The Spur is the home of the High Line Plinth, a site dedicated to a rotating series of artists. (6sqft)

Watch the complete debate for Queens DA. (NY1)

During the debate, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz was the favored punching bag of the seven candidates. (Politico)

We could be seeing the beginning of the end of the measles epidemic in Brooklyn. Everyone celebrate by making sure you’re vaccinated. (amNY)

New York state is one of three that doesn’t allow paid surrogacy, but even with a progressive legislature, it isn’t certain to be abolished. Abolishment of the prohibition has the governor’s support and a bill passed the state senate, but it is stalled in the assembly, where it has split progressive support. (NY Times)

The “Flower Flashes” by Lewis Miller Design might be the city’s most wholesome vandalism the city has ever seen. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo plans on hiring the former federal prosecutor that convicted former Speaker of the State Assembly, Sheldon Siver, to investigate a former federal prosecutor to look into the overtime issue plaguing the MTA. (Politico)

Remember that T-Mobile/Spring merger? New York is suing to block it from happening. (Patch)

Riverside Park is getting a new skate park at 108th St. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Riverside at W 108th has a history as a skatepark. The Riverside Skate Park was the first “solid” skate park in the city, originally built by NYC skateboarding pioneer Andy Kessler. This piece in the Times from 2013 shows the history of the community’s dedication to maintaining it in honor of Kessler’s vision. (NY Times)

A guide to the pizza ovens of Brooklyn, illustrated by Koren Shadmi. (NY Times)

Jon Stewart, the conscience of New Yorkers, took to Congress on Tuesday to rightfully shame our government for not fully funding the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund. (Patch)

John Jay College is being sued by students who allege the college botched sexual misconduct allegations against four professors, called “The Swamp.” (Patch)

The best restaurants of 2019 so far, according to Eater critic Robert Sietsema. (Eater)

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