The Briefly for November 1-2, 2020 – The “Time to Buy Discount Candy” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: New York’s new travel rules, Halloween in NYC, the MTA proposes a doomsday scenario, must-try vegan dishes, an NYC book cart, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 57˚
Rain in the afternoon and evening.

Halloween is over. The first time you’ll hear “All I Want For Christmas Is You” this year could happen any minute now.

New York City is the second-best city in the world. Who did we lose out to? Those bastards in London. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

“I have to urge all New Yorkers—do not travel out of state for the holidays.” -Mayor de Blasio, laying out that this year, everyone gets a pass on visiting family. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Ask An Epidemiologist: How should I handle the holidays? Bullet point number one: If in doubt, don’t go. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An autumn NYC bingo card. (Jen Carlson and Sarah Butler for Gothamist)

The rules have changed for interstate travel, so let’s take a look. If you’re coming to New York, you’re supposed to have a negative Covid-19 test within three days of traveling and once you’re in New York, you’ll have to isolate until the fourth day after returning and take another Covid-19 test. If you decline a test, you have to quarantine for 14 days. This doesn’t apply to travel to and from Connecticut or New Jersey. This applies to travel from everywhere, not just specific states. How will this be enforced? Once again Cuomo has made his favorite move: shifting the blame onto “local health departments.” No doubt, he will have a press conference in a few weeks, blaming another surge in numbers of a lack of local enforcement. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo gave the go-ahead for schools in the city’s hot zones to reopen with stricter testing guidelines. Everyone, staff and students, must first test negative for Covid-19 and after that testing, 25% of the school must be tested on a weekly basis. A school will be shut down if nine positive tests come back or if any school with over 300 tests has a 2% positivity rate. The city’s rules state if a school has two positive cases, the school must close, so we are left in a weird place where the city’s rules apple on top of the state’s. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

How’s the city doing when it comes to Covid-19? Not great, Bob. There are 67 of 177 zip codes where the average positivity rate is over 2%. Sixteen of them are over 3%. (Elizabeth Kim and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Covid-19 hospitalizations are up, but the situation is not nearly as dire as it was in the spring, with multiple factors preventing a high death count. (J. David Goodman and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A Tale of Two Cities: Looking at why the rate of Covid-19 testing is 4x higher in wealthy neighborhoods compared to low-income neighborhoods. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

Only 15% of Manhattan office employees are expected to return by the end of this year, which is down from the estimated 26%, an estimate made in August. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Are you headed back to the office? Here are the perks companies are using to entice their workers to come back. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

The only way to really self-isolate is to go to your own island. Ask Kim Kardashian-West, she’ll agree. For only $4.9 million, you can own your own private island in New York with a century-old mansion on the property along with 24/7 security, a private beach, and a kitchen larger than most restaurants in the city. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

The great divide in New York isn’t partisan or ideological. And it’s not about where Upstate begins, or which side of that mythical border you fall on. It’s a divide by wealth – of who is struggling amid this pandemic, and who is profiting off of it. Who faces the catastrophic consequences of New York’s budget deficit, and who is insulated from both the stakes of the problem and the policies that could be the solution.
-Public Advocate Jumaane Williams and State Senator Jessica Ramos, A just recovery: It’s time for a billionaires’ tax, for amNewYork Metro

Look at this warehouse full of 400 assholes in Williamsburg. Nearly 400 people were at an illegal Halloween party that was broken up by the city. eight people face multiple charges over the party. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Photos: Some traditions shouldn’t die. November 1? Time to look at photos of costumes and go raid the stores for candy. There was no Village Halloween parade this year, but here’s a photo gallery from Halloween parades past. Now go buy yourself some cheap candy (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

This year’s greatest Halloween innovation is the candy chute. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Photos: Before we get into the election stuff, let’s take a moment to find serenity. Fall foliage is about to peak in NYC. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Photos: More photos of foliage in the city. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Along with peak foliage, the bufflehead ducks are here. This link is complete with a guide to help you spot them. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Staten Island has a duck problem. It seems that people have been releasing domestic ducks into the wild and domestic ducks don’t have natural camouflage or know that it’s time to leave the city once it gets too cold. Urban Rangers have been doing their best to capture them and bring them to sanctuaries in order to prevent them from freezing to death in the winter. (Bree Driscoll for NY1)

How to avoid election stress. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

The most hotly contested election in NYC will be between Congressmember Max Rose and Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, and with a toss-up in the polls and a high number of absentee ballots, the fight will extend far beyond election day. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Who doesn’t love Paul Rudd? He showed up at the Barclay’s Center to give out cookies to people waiting to cast an early ballot. (Josephine Harvey for HuffPost)

Governor Cuomo once said that he wasn’t going to wait for neighboring states to legalize marijuana before he made it happen in New York. On Tuesday New Jersey is voting to legalize marijuana and New York has nothing aside from multiple years of promises that it’s gonna happen. Legalization is currently polling at 66%. (Karen Rouse for Gothamist)

The MTA will not be restoring overnight service on Election Day, forcing poll workers who need to have polling locations open at 6 am looking for other plans. The MTA says that poll workers can get car service if their commute is over 90 minutes on Election Day, but the Board of Education will foot the bill. (NY1)

The MTA has put a 50% reduction of service and scuttling improvements on the table when it comes to trying to fix a gaping hole in its budget. This is a doomsday scenario that would cause New York to lose nearly 450,000 jobs by 2022 and losing $50 billion in the process. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

This is the headline: Driver, Union Say MTA Bus Dispatchers Need Empathy Training After Menstrual Ordeal. (Hasani Gittens for The City)

Make sure that all of your non-internet-based clocks have been set for Daylight Saving Time. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Francisco Garcia, the NYPD officer with a history of seven misconduct lawsuits in five years who also was caught on video punching and then kneeling on a man’s neck during a social distance stop, quit the NYPD before a department trial was able to begin. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Demonstrators and police faced off Tuesday outside the New York City Police Benevolent Association’s headquarters in Lower Manhattan as part of a “Strike The PBA” event, calling for the PBA to be kicked out from the larger labor movement due to its support of officers who have killed New Yorkers and its endorsement of former New Yorker and known racist President Donald Trump. (Amba Guerguerian for The Indypendent)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea announced Juanita Holmes as the new Chief of Patrol, making her the first woman to ever hold the position in the 175-year history of the department and the highest-ranking Black woman on the police force. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

“Police are on the scene after a car jumped the curb in Queens, killing a woman and child, and injuring a second child.” -Mayor de Blasio, who is not speaking from inside an alternative Cars-based alternate reality where cars are sentient and are capable of murder. In this reality, people who drive cars kill people. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

A crane accident in the city’s second-tallest building sent debris falling to 57th in Billionaire’s Row. Thankfully no one was hurt. (Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio gave the go-ahead for the sale of The Mets to billionaire Steve Cohen. Starting today, Cohen is re-instituting unionized employees’ pre-pandemic salaries. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Say hello to Brittany Bond, founder of Common Books, who operates the city’s only traveling book cart. (Nicoleta Papavasilakis for Untapped New York)

“Always read the plaque” is a mantra we should all live by. Stop by 555 Hudson St to find a new plaque honoring Jane Jacobs, who lived at the address from 1947 – 1968. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

19 stand-out vegan dishes to try right now. (Emily Wilson for Eater)

The New York Times has discovered that people have roommates. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Apartment Porn: A $15 million, three-story Upper East Side penthouse that overlooks Central Park, complete with a glass solarium, two terraces, and a separate one-bedroom guest residence. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Heist! They stole more than 4,000 Prada, Gucci, and Chanel items from a cargo area at JFK, making off with $6 million in goods… until they were arrested. (Troy Closson for NY Times)

The best Filipino restaurants in the city. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 31, 2020 – The “NYC Loves Until It Destroys” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: School outbreak plans, restaurant openings and closings, looking at a billionaire’s tax, where to eat outdoor brunch, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 78˚
Rain in the morning.
This weekend – Low: 75˚ High: 85˚

Is it legal to sublet your apartment? Yes, but it’s complicated. (Localize.City)

Photos: If you’re looking for a unique experience when it comes to outdoor dining, check out the USS Baylander at the West Harlem Piers near 125th St, which has a dockside bar and restaurant. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Real Estate Porn: A $3.4 million Clinton Hill house with a haunted past. (Dana Shulz for 6sqft)

Just in time for school conversations to spin up again, here’s this headline from the Times: Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds. (Apoorva Mandavilli for NY Times)

Every student in the city is going to be issued a $420 food stamp card, regardless of their income. This creates a weird dilemma for high-income families. The money on the cards is real and if it isn’t used it’s wasted, and giving the card to someone else to use is fraud. Fortunately, there is a solution. (Matt Katz for Gothamist)

The city released plans for handling Covid-19 outbreaks in schools. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Is it possible for New Yorkers to “discover” a secluded and wonderful spot without destroying it? That’s the question across the entire city. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Without a federal stimulus, do NYC schools have enough money to open safely? (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Suraj Patel isn’t ready to concede the 12th Congressional district primary to incumbent Carolyn Mahoney, despite Mahony’s 3,700 vote lead, citing 12,000 ballots invalidated by the Board of Elections. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

He survived physical abuse, homelessness, and gang violence before coming to America as a refugee, where a homeless shelter trashed his wheelchairs while Saheed Adebayo Aare was put in a Manhattan isolation hotel. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Looking for somewhere new and weird to explore? Check out Dead Horse Inlet and Dead Horse Bay. (Kevin Wash for Forgotten New York)

The New York Liberty has a new CEO, just like the Brooklyn Nets do. Joe Tsai owns both teams and has been taking steps to put them both on equal footing with the installation of Keia Clark as CEO of the Liberty with the eventual goal of bringing the Liberty to the Barclays Center once possible. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Interview: Amanda Cohen, the chef and owner of Dirt Candy on if the no-tipping movement can survive the pandemic. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

The Department of Environmental Protection is looking to delay the Gowanus Canal cleanup from somewhere between 12 to 18 months due to declining revenues during the pandemic. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Remember when Governor Cuomo promised states that when New York was over the Covid-19 hump, he’d start sending help? Florida is the first recipient of his pledge, with the state sending gowns, gloves, masks, face shields, and hand santizer. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state’s legislature is introducing bills to try to prevent a doomsday scenario in the city where a rise in apartment vacancies could put an end to rent regulation. Under the current laws, when more than 5% of NYC apartments are vacant, rent regulation would come to an end. Building apartments and intentionally keeping them empty or working as hard as possible to evict tenants to drive up the vacancy rate sounds like a conspiracy but I’ll never put anything past landlords. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Governor Cuomo is against raising taxes on billionaires but seems to be totally cool with raising MTA fares and tolls on bridges, essentially taxing every non-billionaire instead. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The arguments for and against the constitutionality of a billionaires’ tax. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

June and July bring the summer’s heat, but it also brings nesting turtles onto the runways of JFK airport. Inside the annual struggle to protect the turtles in Jamaica Bay. (Lori Chung for NY1)

Even if Columbia University attempts to return to in-person classes in the call a strike by maintenance workers could halt their plans completely unless a new contract is agreed to by Friday night. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

With no help from the Yankees, the 161st St BID is trying to create a welcoming atmosphere around the stadium to help many of the area’s struggling businesses. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

McCarren Tennis Center’s weatherproof bubble over the public tennis courts will stay up all summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

Only around 14 percent of state prison inmates have been tested for Covid-19 since the crisis began. I’m no epidemiologist, but that seems like a low percentage. In comparison, there has been 2.596 million tests conducted in the city, which would cover about 30% of the population. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Tropical Storm Isaias may make landfall in NYC on Monday because things aren’t hard enough already. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What to expect at today’s “Take Your Knee Off Our Necks” in Midtown. (NY1)

Mayor Bill de Blasio is making the New York City court system into a scapegoat for the recent surge in gun violence according to Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks. (NY1)

Queens got a Black Lives Matter mural in front of the Family Court on Jamaica Avenue. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Get ready, because it’s ConEd blackout season. Southern Brooklyn was the first to be asked to turn down their electrical usage. (Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Where to get takeout in Greenwich Village and the West Village. Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The MTA is installing free mask dispensers inside city buses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Augustine in the Financial DIstrict. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Rosario’s Pizza on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

A list of the Williamsburg & Greenpoint places closed for good during COVID-19. (Bill Pearis for Greenpointers)

Farewell to Le Sia in the East Village. (EV Grieve)

Farewell to An Choi on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Union Pool’s patio and taco truck are back! (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Mott Street from Worth to Moscoe is closed off to cars and 10 restaurants all have outdoor dining with seating for over 100. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Where to eat outside on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The best outdoor brunch spots in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 21, 2020 – The “Don’t Make Me Turn This Car Around” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Night and weekend subway construction returns next month, Domino Park gets private security, the new owner of Ample Hills, and more

Today – Low: 77˚ High: 89˚
Humid throughout the day.

Video: Walking through Occupy City Hall. (Action Kid)

Apartment Porn: A $4 million townhouse in Windsor Terrace with an inground saltwater pool. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Reducing service, slashing the transit workforce, scrapping planned infrastructure improvements, raising tolls beyond scheduled increases, and some of the other “hard choices no matter what happens” at the MTA over the next few years with a projected $16 billion loss. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The pandemic is making more New Yorkers consider buying cars. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork Metro)

There’s never been a better time to have contactless payment on the subways. OMNY is available throughout the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

It feels like we haven’t heard anything about subway closures for construction in forever, but here we are. The F line’s Rutgers Tube, which connects Brooklyn and Manhattan, will close nights and weekends starting in August through the spring to finish Hurricane Sandy repairs and fortification. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Governor Cuomo is going full-on “don’t make me turn this car around” when it comes to bar and restaurant openings. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Mayor de Blasio saw the video of a homeless man being punched in the face by an NYPD and decided that everyone and no one is to blame for the situation continuing his longstanding tradition of never taking a stand on anything and upsetting everyone on every side of every situation. A true ally to nobody. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Pulling the enforcement of the city’s Open Streets away from the NYPD and asking community partners to take over was supposed to make things easier. Now, the NYPD are harassing volunteers. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Apparently asking that the NYPD stop beating and killing New Yorkers is too much to ask if you’re NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea. (Joe Jurado for The Root)

“The NYPD demands accountability from everyone but themselves. The Department refuses to require personnel to attend virtual misconduct hearings or provide body camera footage to investigators. Officers without masks beat masked demonstrators on video, after weeks of sometimes-violent mask-wearing enforcement, then insisted that more cops were essential for public safety.”
– Maryanne Kaishian, senior policy counsel at Brooklyn Defender Services, Cops continue misinformation campaign to smear policies they don’t like for Brooklyn Eagle

The widely cited and incorrect talking point of a politician who is trying to convince their constituents that using tax dollars to pay for a sports stadium is beneficial for the neighborhood. The Yankees received $1.186 billion in public money and tax breaks to build their new stadium in 2009. Eleven years later, the Yankees pay no property taxes on an estimated $5 billion of city-owned land, the Bronx will not see any baseball fans in 2020, and the neighborhood surrounding Yankee stadium is economically dying, with the average merchant behind on rent to the tune of $60,000. This year, the Yankees signed pitched Gerrit Cole for $324 million. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

Deep in the city’s budget is 4.1 million dedicated to supporting people involved in the sex trade, but what does that even mean? (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

An interview with Brian Nagy, an NYC teacher in the school system’s remote teaching pilot program that says remote learning may, in some form, be here to stay. (Gabrielle Birkner for Chalkbeat)

What to expect in phase four. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The FDNY had to save two people whose inflatable swan drifted into the East River and began sinking. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Jerry Wolkoff, the man best known as the developer that demolished 5Pointz. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The 7 best hikes near New York City. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

RIP Nina Kapur, CBS2 reporter who died after a moped crash in Manhattan. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Interview: Michael Zapata, the new owner of Ample Hills on why a guy who manufactures precision lasers in Oregon just bought an ice cream company in Brooklyn. (Joshua David Stein for Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse with an “enchanted garden” backyard, six fireplaces, and private parking. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Sheldon Silver, the former New York State Assembly speaker, is going to prison for 78 months after being convicted on corruption charges. (Benjamin Weiser and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Why the hell does Domino Park, a public space, have private security guards posted at its entrances? (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group restaurants are ending their move towards no-tipping policies. Meyer believes tipping contributes to inequitable pay, wage instability, and other problems. He says he’s ending the policies because “guests want to tip generously right now.” That’s extending a lot of trust, considering it’s not his income he’s making policies about. (Julia Moskin for NY Times)

The president is threatening to send federal agents to the city to “keep this city safe.” We have heard some awful ideas this year, each dumber than the last, but I can’t ever imagine this ending well. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The William Vale’s pool is now open to the public with the price tag starting at a hefty $75 for a few hours and going up to $500 for two people. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Check out this wonderful pen and ink cityscape from artist Kaylie Fairclough. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A call for Mayor de Blasio to shut off the lights so the city can see the comet Neowise. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Wait times for results for Covid-19 tests across the city are slipping. The free tests available at the city’s publicly run hospital network are beyond the advertised 3-5 days and are drifting towards the two-week territory. (Anastassia Gliadkovskaya for The City)

Attention mallrats: Indoor malls are still closed. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

A deeper look at the temporary hospital that was built at U.S.T.A. Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, which cost $52 and treated 79 patients. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

Where to eat dim sum outdoors in Chinatown. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)