The Briefly for June 23, 2020 – The “Are These NYC’s Bad Old Days?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s primary day in NYC, a look at the rules of outdoor dining in phase two, surprising chickens in a drug bust, the NY Post’s “copaganda,” and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 82˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

Here’s how to vote in today’s primary. (BKLYNER)

Today is the primary across the city, but don’t expect results so quickly this time around. Absentee ballots aren’t counted until eight days past the election. We could be waiting a while. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, let me introduce you to the stacked highways all across Manhattan idea from the 1930s. (Joshua Mu for Viewing NYC)

After a spike in gun violence over the weekend, the mayor said the city isn’t going back to the bad old days where there was “so much violence in this city,” but also “Nor are we going back to the bad old days where policing was done the wrong way.” According to that statement, we are currently living in “the bad old days.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

With phase two, the city’s playgrounds have reopened. They are literally no safer than they used to be, so don’t expect sanitization or regular cleanings. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

The city formally announced that phase two would start on Monday on Thursday, giving restaurants four days to prepare and comply with a new set of regulations for outdoor dining. (Gary He for Eater)

What to expect from phase two of NYC’s reopening. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Here are the guidelines for reopened restaurants as a part of phase two. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

More than 3,000 restaurants have signed up to set up outdoor dining as the city enters the second phase of its reopening. The restaurants approved will be allowed to set up tables and chairs in parking spaces and sidewalks. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state moratorium on evictions ended over the weekend. There are advocacy groups that are estimating 50,000 – 60,000 cases could be filed in the next few days. This is the first wave of expected cases, another protection for people who were directly affected by Covid-19 expires in August. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hundreds of people gathered in protest to demand the eviction ban continues until the state has recovered from the Covid-19 crisis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An investigation is ongoing after a man fell onto the tracks and was hit and killed by the 7 train on Sunday night. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

“Back in my day, if you wanted to go to a Target, you had to go to Brooklyn, the Bronx, or New Jersey” is what very lame grandparents will tell their grandkids. Target announced it is opening stores on the Upper East and West Sides. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Facebook is eyeing expanding its footprint in the Hudson Yards, taking over the space that will be left vacant by Neiman Marcus’s bankruptcy. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos and Video: 10,000+ riders took part in the Street Riders’ Black Lives Matter Ride through Manhattan. Fun fact, more people showed up for the ride than turned out for Trump’s Tulsa rally. (Amanda Hatfield, photos by Toby Tenenbaum for BrooklynVegan)

Heads up: The produce at this week’s farmers markets should be fantastic. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to a loophole about how the NYPD’s cars are funded, the two lawyers that are accused of tossing Molotov cocktails into empty police cars may be facing life in prison. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A look at the NY Post’s recent history of running “copaganda” articles that share police narratives with anonymous sourcing, zero additional verification, and in contradiction of facts. (Kay Dervishi for City and State)

The NYPD are known liars. Despite their crying in public about being “poisoned” by Shake Shack employees, a thorough review shows that the officers involved never displayed any symptoms of illness and the Shake Shack employees couldn’t have known that the order was for NYPD officers because the order was placed online. Despite this, police unions sent out information that the officers had started throwing up and invented a narrative of Antifa employees inside Shake Shack. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea testified in defense of the police’s actions against protesters during the first week of June without providing details and dodging every possible question that involved specifics and dismissed a delivery person’s arrest as a “false report.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Look around the city and you’ll see iconic statues wearing face masks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What is usually the best party in the city every year, the Mermaid Parade, is going to be virtual and take place on August 29. (Amanda Hatfield for Brooklyn Vegan)

The Inwood rezoning lawsuit, which was ruled that the de Blasio administration failed to account for the potential change in the racial makeup of the neighborhood, could forever change how the city plans neighborhoods towards something more equitable. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Members of Sure We Can, the city’s only nonprofit redemption center, is requesting $2.3 million from the city’s budget, saying they will have to close their Bushwick location that it has occupied for ten years without it, where hundreds of canners gather each morning to sort and redeem their bottles and cans.  (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The surprising part of this drug bust was unrelated to the drugs, it was the chickens. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man who tried to escape Rikers Island on Thursday made another attempt to escape on Sunday. According to inmates at Rikers, the measures taken to combat Covid-19 have made Rikers intolerable. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Okay, phase two is in effect, but let’s look at what phase three could mean for the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

28 restaurants open for outdoor dining this week. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 15, 2020 – The “Not Understanding the Reality of NYC” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo signs police reforms, the monetary cost of Covid-19, the week without the NYPD, Bed-Stuy’s Black Lives Matter street mural, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 73˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Still waiting for your absentee ballot for the June 23 primary? You’re not alone. (Christine Chung for The City)

Here’s what to do if you’ve applied and haven’t gotten your absentee ballot for the June 23 primary. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Meet the six challengers to incumbent State Senators and Assembly Members among StreetsPAC’s 24 endorsements for the June 23 primary. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

Here’s your guide to the June 23 Manhattan primary ballot. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Mayor de Blasio’s appropriation of Black pain has suited his political ambitions, but when it’s been time to walk the walk, he’s tripped, stumbled, or changed directions. As a result, his Black supporters are abandoning him. (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

“I think anyone who questions the ability of this city government to do what we’re here to do and my ability as mayor to use the tools of city government even in a time of crisis doesn’t really understand the reality of New York City.” I might believe the mayor if he said that about me, but I don’t believe him when he’s talking about the city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams and City Councilmember Donovan Richards. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Photos: Let’s be clear. If you were one of the people out in the street on St. Marks over the weekend, you’re a complete asshole. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

After an eternity of quarantine, a summer reading list emerges. (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

With nothing else to do, we’ve descended on the parks. When we found the parks, we all found them together and searched for our own spaces to attempt to maintain the distance that we were told to. With our dogs at our sides, we found little patches where we thought we could let our dogs off their leashes, because “they’re good dogs.” Little did we know that we found our way into and disturbed the domains of the birds and the bird watchers. (David Kobe for Bedford + Bowery)

Tired of Tinder and Plenty of Fish and Farmers Only and Make Out Club? Business is bananas for match makers. (Angi Gonzalez for NY1)

The governor gave the state’s day camps the go-ahead, but the de Blasio administration is completely unprepared to help make the city’s camps a reality. (Jessica Gould and David Cruz for Gothamist)

Revel is expanding, again, this time adding its electric mopeds to portions of the Bronx. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Ever want to rent a diner? Now (not NOW but in 2021) you can rent out the Golden Diner with the proceeds supporting the Brooklyn Rescue Mission. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Pop-up drive-in movie experiences are going to be to this summer what pop-up pools were to last summer. (Regan Mies for amNewYork Metro)

Heads up, Manhattanhenge is coming on July 11 and 12. Maybe this is a great year to skip it, as there’s pretty much one spot in the entire city to get a good view and we’re still gonna be trying to keep our distance from each other in a month. (StreetEasy)

When Paramedic Megan Pfeiffer was interviewed on TV about how EMTs were sleeping in their cars to prevent potentially spreading Covid-19, she was rewarded by the FDNY by having her uniform taken away from her, according to a lawsuit. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Have you been hearing drag racing out your windows? You’re not the only one, complaints about drag racing has quadrupled during the Covid-19 pandemic. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The hundreds of contact tracing workers hired by the city under de Blasio’s new “test and trace” campaign have been instructed not to ask anyone who’s tested positive for COVID-19 whether they recently attended a demonstration in the last few weeks. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

How much does it cost to recover from Covid-19? For Janet Mendez, the cost is $401,885.57. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

At a rate of infection of 0.77, New York has the lowest infection rate in the country. The governor attributes this to the slow reopening process. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Ellie Murray, an epidemiologist at Boston University, is worried that recent protests will spike Covid-19 cases. Murray isn’t worried that the protesters will spread is amongst themselves, but specifically, the police’s interactions with protesters is the problem. The police were the ones not wearing face masks, the police were the ones forcing protesters to stand close to one another, and it was the police spraying protesters with chemicals designed to cause respiratory issues. (Chloe K. Li for Gothamist)

All New York police forces must “reinvent” their departments or risk losing state funding as part of sweeping reform legislation Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed into law Friday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

There is a call to change the name of Christopher Columbus Park in Downtown Brooklyn and to remove the statue from the park. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

What’s NYC without the police? It’s happened before. A look back at the police strike of 1971. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The NYPD is guarding the Christopher Columbus statue in Columbus Circle. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Aakash Patel is creating an archive of NYC traffic camera feeds in the hopes that if another incident happens involving the NYPD, there will be additional cameras capturing what happened. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A billion dollars is a lot of money, here’s what a billion dollars from the NYPD budget could do for housing in NYC. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

A look at the five investigations into the NYPD’s conduct against protesters. (Yasmeen Chan for Gothamist)

A double-parked car on Park Avenue in The Bronx began a chain of events that caused the death of a cyclist on Thursday afternoon — but the NYPD neither charged the driver of the illegally parked car or the driver of the truck that killed the bike user. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

A partial look at the NYPD’s awful stewardship of Vision Zero. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Photos: Bed-Stuy has its own 375-foot long Black Lives Matter street painting at Restoration Plaza on Fulton St and New York Ave. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo signed a package of police reform bills into law on Friday, which included a ban on chokeholds, the repeal of 50a, and others. While this is a good step forward, I hope that the governor and state legislature doesn’t believe that this is mission accomplished. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

A look at the street art celebrating the life of George Floyd. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

After nearly seven weeks, the National Park Service has reopened Floyd Bennett Field to the public. It had become a makeshift parking lot of MTA buses. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

One time when I was apartment hunting I watched an agent jump over a fence so he could crawl through a window so he could show me an apartment after he “left the keys in the office.” How to avoid being the victim of a rental scam. (Alicia Schwartz for StreetEasy)

Systemic racism, poor management, intimidating non-disclosure agreements, and a culture of fear. This isn’t the Trump organization, we’re talking about The Wing. A detailed history. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

Thanks to the rush of white people suddenly interested in Black history and systemic racism, independent bookstores are struggling to keep up with the volume of books being ordered, but to quote Kalima DeSuze of Cafe con Libros, “W would prefer that he still be alive and I still be struggling.” (Karen Rouse for Gothamist)

NYC restaurants selling groceries and meal kits. (Bryan Kim & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for June 8, 2020 – The “I Guess This Is Phase One?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase one kicks off today, the mayor is forced to lift the city’s curfew early, the MTA’s plans for phase one, a protest of the mayor, and more

Are you absentee voting this month? (You should be absentee voting this month.) Here’s how to make sure your absentee vote counts. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

The absentee ballot deadline was extended to June 23. Get your application in now. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Here we go, phase one. Here’s what it means. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The mayor announced he would end the city’s curfew one day early because, according to him, there had been a night without violent protests. In the reality that the rest of us live in, a lawsuit from the NYCLU, the Legal Aid Society, the Thurgood Marchall Civil Rights Center, and the Center for Constitutional Rights were about to force the mayor to lift the curfew and three different district attorneys in the city refused to charge most protestors that were arrested. (Ali Tufan Koc and Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A protest of the mayor is expected on Monday morning (or was expected, depending on when you read this) to push de Blasio into actually enacting police reforms. The march, which includes members of the mayor’s administration, isn’t organized by the same people who wrote the open letter tot he mayor, but it shows how unified the city is in its disgust over the mayor’s ability to talk a lot and do very little. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

As Minneapolis already has, activists are calling on the NYC Department of Education to cut ties with the NYPD. Chancellor Richard Carranza, appointed by the mayor, does not favor a “counselors not cops” approach to school safety. Since 2014 the school safety budget has increased by 25% and while the school budget for next year is decreasing under the budget already revealed by the mayor, the budget for safety is increasing. (Alex Zimmerman for The City)

What can the city do with the NYPD’s $6 billion? Quite a bit. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Thursday night’s NYPD ambush of peaceful protesters was, according to Commissioner Dermont Shea, “executed flawlessly.” It included beating and arresting legal observers, medics, pepper-spraying a pregnant woman, and featured Terence Monahan kneeling with protesters one moment and directing officers to arrest the protest’s leaders the next. The NYPD claimed that “interlopers” were to blame for the police violence but a video of what happened shows otherwise and the NYPD has yet to show any evidence of this. (Jake Offenhartz and Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A look at the NYPD’s strategy of “kettling” protestors, which shows a shift in police tactics towards aggression. Of course, the mayor has defended this practice, saying it is sometimes necessary for public safety. I’m not sure which public he’s referring to. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Does the name Terence Monahan ring a bell? It should because he was the person in charge of the city’s response to protesters during the 2004 GOP convention. In 2004 the protesters had been told they could march and were then arrested en masse. Charges were dismissed against all 227 arrested. The city later settling a lawsuit with the protesters for $18 million. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Terence Monahan has a legacy of brutality. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Governor Cuomo announced a “Say Their Name” package of bills which would criminalize making a false race-based 911 call, ban chokeholds, revise 50-1 (unknown what this means), and assign the Attorney General an independent prosecutor for matters related to the death of unarmed citizens caused by law enforcement. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The state’s Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus has their own package of 13 bills they’ve unveiled which also adds mandates for body cameras for state and MTA police, establishes strangulation as a crime mandates medical attention for people under arrest, and more. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

We’re committed to seeing a shift of funding to youth services, to social services, that will happen literally in the course of the next three weeks, but I’m not going to go into detail because it is subject to negotiation and we want to figure out what makes sense.” -Mayor de Blasio, talking big, one more time. He says “literally in the course of the next three weeks” because it literally has to get done because of the city’s budget, not because he wants to enact reforms quickly. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Two NYPD officers were suspended for violence against protesters. One is the officer who pushed a woman to the ground and the other the officer who pulled down a protester’s face mask and pepper-sprayed him. Just two. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Next, suspend every cop who covered their badge number during the protests with the bullshit excuse of the covers being “mourning bands.” (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Photos: East Village storefronts show their support for Black Lives Matter. (EV Grieve)

In comparison, the award for “the shittiest tribute to victims of racial violence” goes to the Museum of Ice Cream’s “I Scream For…” painted boards. (Elie Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Returning to the subways today? Here’s what you need to know. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The MTA clearly has a plan for people who will be riding the subway. It may not be a perfect plan, but it’s a plan. The mayor? Come on, you know he doesn’t have a plan based in reality. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

“This week and going forward, you might notice some other helpful additions to your local station — like new hand sanitizer dispensers and new signs reminding you how to keep yourself safe. You’ll also see floor markings, floor decals, and new directions aimed at communicating with you clearly about how to safely move around our system.
-Sarah Feinberg, acting President of MTA New York City Transit for amNewyork Metro, MTA is glad to have you back for the NYC reopening

With June 8’s phase one reopening of the city, you might be asking a few questions that are closer to home, like “will my building’s gym/pool be opening soon?” Get ready for a complicated road back. (Joanne Kaufman for NY Times)

The city will begin testing sewage for Covid-19, to get an idea of how the virus is spreading hundreds or thousands of people at a time. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into a law that will grant death benefits to Covid-19 frontline workers’ families. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

A peek into what remains of Park, a Chelsea restaurant that abruptly closed last year and appears to be slowly taken over by trees. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

If you’re like me, at this point in the summer you’d have ridden the Coney Island Cyclone multiple times. If you’ve been missing the anticipation of the climb of the first hill and the exhilaration of the drop, these 360° videos of the Cyclone and Thunderbolt are gonna be as close as we can get for a while. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Last Wednesday night the city’s known Covid-19 death toll hit 0 for the first time since March 12. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

James Bennet, who oversaw the editorial pages of the NY Times, is out. The paper blames it on “a significant breakdown of our editorial process” because of the Senator Tom Cotton editorial which promoted violence against protesters. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

RIP Kanela, a red-headed Siberian husky and the unofficial mascot of Welcome2TheBronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

In 1982, the MTA thought they could paint their cars brilliant white to prevent them from being spray painted. “The Great White Fleet” idea was as stupid as it sounds. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

A bit of news that passed by in the insanity that was Memorial Day weekend and every single day since then, the City Council banned the use of the terms “alien” and “illegal immigrant” on official city documents. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Central Park West’s mystery manhole cover. (Ephemeral New York)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse in Prospect Heights with outdoor space, amazing woodwork, and one of the most wildly-colored bathrooms I’ve ever seen. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A list of lists: A roundup of NYC’s Black-owned restaurant lists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Thank you to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!