The Briefly for November 14, 2019 – The “Problem Goes Deeper Than Policing Churros” Edition

Virginity tests, the NYPD’s illegal child fingerprint database was destroyed, the food at Wegmans gets reviewed, OMNY expands, pie shops, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The punishment for killing a woman with a car? $750 and a suspended license. (Streetsblog)

“I am calling on the governor to immediately remove these additional officers from the MTA and put that money into actually improving the system. The governor cannot expect the public to pay the fare when the State is refusing to hold up its own financial responsibility.” – City Council Member Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn (Streetsblog)

Will the 500 new police officers on buses and in subway stations prevent 33 million evaded fares a year for ten years? That figure, of course, doesn’t include any lawsuits that spawn from arrests made by those officers. That’s the monetary argument, but if the surge of officers is about fare evasion and protecting MTA workers, why are the headlines about churro ladies and teenagers selling candy? It’s about the kind of city we want to be. (Second Ave Sagas)

A look at the new Tompkins Square Playground’s equipment for kids with special needs. (EV Grieve)

The City Council voted to give themselves a $36,000 raise, but haven’t been nearly as generous with their staff, who make $47,784 annually on average. There has been conversations about unionization to improve salaries. (Politico)

A vegetarian restaurant that only serves one item, but is it any good? Yes is the answer. (Gothamist)

The city owns most of the land in the amusement area of Coney Island, but Central Amusement International (owners of Luna Park) operates the lease on the boardwalk shops. In addition to rent, they take 10% of their overall sales. In recent years they’ve been favoring their own games, shops, and food options over mom and pop shops. This is a private business deciding on the future of businesses who are on land owned by the city. Lola Star, the woman behind the boardwalk shop and roller discos across Brooklyn is stepping up and resurrecting the advocacy group Save Coney Island. (Coney Island Blog)

Every rental building in Manhattan ranked by price. (StreetEasy)

The Charging Bull isn’t moving… yet. Despite the mayor talking big in public about how it has to be moved due to Bowling Green being an unsafe place for that high number of visitors it receives, a location to move it to was never decided on. For now, the bull remains. (Gothamist)

The Coalition for Affordable Homes is introducing a proposal for a Small Home Anti-Speculation Tax that would impose a 15-20% tax on property transferred to a new owner within two years of ownership. While they may not prevent flipping houses, it would reinvest in affordable housing in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

After 24,200 calls to 911 since June using a burner cellphone, Yogit Persaud was arrested. Each time she would call, the police or FDNY or both would have to respond to the claim, regardless if they knew it was from her and it was a false report. Persaud purports the NYPD has conspired against her. She was arrested for making a false emergency report, obstructing governmental administration, and aggravated harassment. (Gothamist)

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, leader of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and current investigator of sexual abuse the Buffalo diocese, sexually assaulted an 11-year-old altar boy when he was a priest in New Jersey in the 70s, according to a new lawsuit. (NY Times)

Billionaire Barry Diller’s public park island off Pier 55 has a new name and it’s “Little Island.” A modest name considering the price tag ballooned from $35 million to $250 million. (Gothamist)

Junior’s Law, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is a bill that will reimburse small businesses owners the cost of a panic button, which could have saved the teenager’s life. The bill has 31 supporters in the City Council. (amNewYork)

Greenwich Village Chelsea Chamber of Commerce wants you to remember that there are still stores that are open left on Bleecker Street to shop at and has declared November 23 “Shop Bleecker Day,” where participating shops will provide deals and discounts. (amNewYork)

Virginity tests are still a thing in the year 2019. A bill was introduced to ban them in New York. This is, of course, coming into headlines now because T.I. admitted in an interview that he forces his 18-year-old daughter to undergo hymen checks annually, which is awful. (Gothamist)

While Staten Island is still a part of New York City (you can read about that in yesterday’s edition of The Briefly), it has a new dockless bike program. Beryl will operate 1,000 bikes across the island starting in the spring. (Streetsblog)

Take a look inside (renderings of) Disney’s upcoming Hudson Square HQ. (amNewYork)

The governor gave National Grid two weeks to hook up new customers of he will revoke their franchise to supply gas to New York City. (Gothamist)

The NYPD’s illegal database of children’s fingerprints was confirmed to be destroyed after a years-long investigation into it by the Legal Aid Society. (Patch)

“Wegmans is not good enough to be your destination food court.” Eater reviews the food at Wegmans. (Eater)

OMNY is hitting more subway stations next month, including Penn Station. (6sqft)

A guide to OMNY. (Curbed)

The city fines landlords for lead, but rarely ever collects. Even the highest estimates put the figure at 10%. (Gothamist)

The new age for tobacco or e-cigarette purchases is now 21 years old. (amNewYork)

Seven ways to fix your overheated apartment. Yes, “open the windows” is number one. (StreetEasy)

14 spectacular pie shops. (Eater)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 12, 2019 – The “Half a Chrysler Building of Cocaine” Edition

The MTA claims the subways are moving faster, the rise of vegan diners, James Dolan will ensure no one ever sees the Knicks, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The previous owners of the Chrysler Building lost $650 million in the $150 million sale of the building. Not a bad deal for 1.2 million square feet. (HuffPost)

Rent in Rego Park and Jackson Heights are leading the way in Queens rent increases according to a February 2019 Rental Market Report. (QNS)

If Knicks owner and awful songwriter James Dolan banned everyone who heckled him to sell the team, there would be no one left in MSG. (Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel at JFK will also include artifact and memorabilia exhibitions. A curator for the New York Historical Society is working on the project. (6sqft)

Jake’s Dilemma, an Upper West Side bar, is being review bombed on Yelp for refusing service to someone in a MAGA hat. The MAGA adorned Dion Cini was banned from Disneyland and Disney World after continually unfurling Trump 2020 banners on rides, so you know he’s a real winner. (Eater)

Jake’s Dilemma suspended the hero bartender, despite owner Mitch Banchik admitting the MAGA man was being obnoxious and was given warnings before being asked to leave. (BrooklynVegan)

Federal agencies seized $77 million of cocaine at a port near the city in the largest bust in 25 years. One more bust of that size and they could have bought the Chrysler Building! (Gothamist)

The diner may be on the decline, but there are new standouts looking to evolve the diner concept with vegan alternatives. (Grubstreet)

Meet the women who founded New York City’s modern and contemporary art museums. (6sqft)

The city’s Department of Education is visiting homeless shelters to help families apply for free pre-kindergarten for all 4-year-olds. Families have until March 15 to apply. (Gothamist)

Does a Spider-Man superfan know more about NYC than a local? Let’s skip the entire “What qualifies someone to be a local?” conversation. That’s never helpful. (Gizmodo)

Meet Fauzia Abdur-Rahman, the jerk chicken queen of the Bronx. (Munchies)

Why do New Yorkers walk so fast? The proper answer is that we don’t. You walk too slow. (Gothamist)

The GVSHP submitted a request to landmark the interior of the West Village’s historic White Horse Tavern after the building was purchased by a questionable consortium of developers. (Curbed)

The woman who sprayed multiple people with pepper spray on Friday reportedly claimed she hated white people before spraying them. Tasha Herd was charged with multiple hate-crime felonies and misdemeanors in connection to the attacks. (NY Times)

The city’s school are going meatless on Mondays for the 2019-2020 school year. It’s healthier for students and better for the environment. (amNY)

Aly and Charlie Weisman went out in search of the city’s best bagel and lox. (Food Insider)

The Brooklyn Diocese is demanding an apology from Pete Davidson after comparing the Catholic Church to R. Kelly. Those in glass cathedrals shouldn’t throw stones. (Gothamist)

The MTA says trains are moving faster at 50 stations across the city. Have you noticed the difference? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The smallest pedestrian bridge in Central Park. (Ephemeral New York)

The joys of getting lost. (Atlas Obscura)

The global Time Out Index has revealed that NYC is the best city in the world. Duh. (Time Out)

There have been 182 cases of measles in the city, almost exclusively within the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. (NY Times)

Where to get brunch if you hate brunch. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for September 21, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Brooklyn Promenade Might Be Closing, and More

BQE construction could shut down the Brooklyn Promenade for years, Battery Park could get a Hurricane Maria memorial, NYC’s only private island, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Before you go anywhere this weekend, check out the changes to the subway. The 2 and M lines look to be especially bad, the L is running, the G is partially running, and the D train is sometimes an A and sometimes an F.

The Brooklyn Promenade could close for six years in order to accommodate construction on the BQE. During construction, the BQE would be elevated to where the promenade currently sits. The promenade would be rebuilt afterwards. The project will cost over $3 billion.

September 22 (Saturday) is Free Museum Day in New York, you can reserve a pair of tickets at one of over two dozen museums throughout the state.

80 Flatbush was unanimously approved by the City Council after undergoing changes to make the project smaller. The next step for the development is seeking Uniform Land Use Review Procedure approval.

One of the city’s top school districts is removing admissions standards in an attempt to diversify the student body. 55% of middle school age students in the district are black or Latino, but 81% of the students in the schools are white. Mayor de Blasio and School Chancellor Richard Carranza approved the plan, which The New York Times points out was not de Blasio’s idea.

Ten elevated parks and gardens across the city from Untapped Cities.

The cost of housing the city’s homeless population has increased. The city is spending $117 a day to house a single adult this year compared to $99 last year. A lack of permanent solutions is being partially blamed for the increase.

The Archdiocese of New York hired Barbara Jones to review its procedures for dealing with the ongoing crisis of clergy sexual-abuse allegations. Jones just finished up the Michael Cohen case two weeks ago. The archdiocese has already paid out $60 million to victims.

If you’ve got a transit nerd in your life the New York Transit Museum’s 25th annual Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park in October.

The Museum of Natural History is starting work on the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation despite a lawsuit by Community United to Save Theodore Roosevelt Park (CUSTR?) aimed at stopping the construction. The lawsuit states the construction would “cause catastrophic environmental damage to the area, posing a series of life threatening hazards.”

Meet the man who owns the only private island in New York City.

Police chief James O’Neill claims that the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights plans to bail out all 16 and 17-year-olds and bail-eligible women from city jails will make the city less safe.

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Citiva, is opening across the street from the Barclays Center.

Governor Cuomo’s former top aide and confidante, Joseph Percoco, will serve six years in prison for bribery.

Fake doctor sentenced for lethal butt injection.

Noted racist James Harris Jackson fatally stabbed a 66-year-old black man with a sword in Midtown last year and told the police it was “practice” for a larger racial terror attack he planned to carry out in Times Square.

What is going on at The Edna Cohen School in Coney Island? More than a week after the primary election there are no votes reported while the State Assembly primary has a 70 vote margin between the candidates.

Governor Cuomo has proposed a memorial to those lost or made homeless by Hurricane Maria in Battery Park City. The governor also announced an expansion of the New York Stands with Puerto Rico program, which sends student volunteers to work with non-profits rebuilding homes on the island.


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