The Briefly for June 19, 2019 – The “That’s Not Pizza, It’s A Strawberry Tart” Edition

The new head of the NYCHA is the highest paid city employee, the city okays six new LGBTQ landmarks, the MTA gets sued for its ad practices, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest,

2019 is the summer of the NYPL’s Bookmobile. The Bookmobile is making its debut this week, operating as a mobile library and offering all the same services. By the end of the summer, the NYPL will have three Bookmobiles. (Untapped Cities)

The Mermaid Parade is this weekend, here are the routes and street closures in the People’s Playground. (Curbed)

Dominique Ansel’s latest creation is here and boy is it an eye-roller. They’re tiramisu made to look like greek coffee cups, strawberry tarts that look like a slice of pizza, pavlova that looks like an everything bagel, and other twists on New York staples. (Time Out)

The new head of the NYCHA’s salary of $400,000 will make him the highest paid city official. Gregory Russ is going from the Minneapolis Housing Authority to the largest in the nation. The $400k salary is $231,000 higher than the last permanent head of the agency. (The City)

Three Lives, on the corner of Waverly and W 10th, has reopened after being closed by the Department of Buildings and having to sell books on the sidewalk. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Someone left a life-like baby doll in Crocheron Park in Bayside, which triggered a full-on NYPD and FDNY response. (QNS)

DUMBO is celebrating the ten year anniversary of the Manhattan Bridge Archway becoming open to the public. Prior to its life as a plaza, it was used for Department of Transportation storage. (6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is covering up Marc Chagall’s “The Lovers” until Thursday in honor of World Refugee Day, to highlight what a world would look like without the art of refugees. (Gothamist)

Some suggestions for unofficial places to watch the July 4th fireworks. (Patch)

Add another entry to your list of unconventional museums in the city. Poster House is “the first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters.” No word if there will be a blacklight and velvet section. (Untapped Cities)

Six of NYC’s historic LGBTQ sites are now city landmarks. The Gay Activists Alliance Firehouse, Caffee Cino, the LGBT Center, the Women’s Liberation Center, the James Baldwin Residence, and Audre Lorde’s Residence made the list. (Curbed)

The city’s critics seem to hate Au Cheval, but that isn’t slowing down people who willingly wait over an hour for a burger. (Grub Street)

Fighting back investors and developers, four areas of Sunset Park have received landmark designation from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which will prevent demolition or large changes to the homes inside the landmark districts. Quick trivia: If you see a brown street sign instead of a green one, you’re in a historic district. (6sqft)

If someone visiting New York asked you how to get tickets to the Statue of Liberty, would you know how? Either buy them online or walk past the dozens of guys trying to sell you tickets all around Bowling Green and buy them at Castle Clinton. While the article is clearly an SEO play, it’s still something most New Yorkers probably didn’t know. (Curbed)

Where does the MTA draw the line with subway ads when it comes to sex? Boner pills, the Museum of Sex, breast implants, condoms, and Tinder all get the go ahead, but they draw the line with sex toys because they are a “sexually oriented business.” Dame Products is suing the MTA over their murky advertising rules. Somehow Tinder’s “DTF” campaign wasn’t about sex? (Patch)

A guide to the elections on June 25. (amNY)

An interview with State Senator Julia Salazar focused on real estate, which took place on the eve of the passage of the state’s new rent reform laws. (The Real Deal)

10 dishes under $20 to try in Hudson Yards. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio nominated Jeffrey Roth, a deputy commissioner for policy and external affairs at the TLC, to lead the Taxi & Limousine Commission in a pick that, in the early stages, seems relatively free of controversy. He must be approved by the City Council before taking the position (amNY)

The city is debating banning Foie Gras as part of a dozen animal welfare bills that were discussed this week. Earlier this year the US Supreme Court upheld California’s foie gras ban, so the legislative path is clear if the city wants to go down it. (amNY)

No one was as vocal a supporter for the death penalty for the Central Park Five than the current president of the United States. If you think he was apologetic when asked about it this week, I would like to sell you the Brooklyn Bridge. (NY Times)

10 walking tours that even New Yorkers will love. A lofty claim, but who wouldn’t be interested a Chinatown food tour, a speakeasy tour of the West Village, or a ghost tour of Greenwich Village? (6sqft)

There’s a new Frank Ape mural in the East Village, part of the 100 Gates Project. (EV Grieve)

10 summer bottomless brunch spots in Astoria. (hint: take the ferry there). (We Heart Astoria)

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The Briefly for June 6, 2019 – The “We Can’t Stop The Ratpocalypse or Rising Sea Levels” Edition

The MTA discrimination disability lawsuit can move forward, ThriveNYC is failing the city’s schools, Uber will helicopter you between Manhattan and JFK, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Uber is offering helicopter rides between lower Manhattan and JFK Airport. Uber Copter kicks off on July 9 and will be available during afternoon commutes. (NY Times)

The Department of Housing Preservation and Development is pushing a new program that would name a “Tenant of Record,” which would end succession rights, which allows relatives to take over their homes after the primary resident dies or moves out. (Patch)

We are headed for a ratpocalypse. Is climate change to blame? (Grist)

Before steam, NYC homes were heated with coal. If you look carefully on some sidewalks you can still find “coal holes,” which allowed for easy delivery. (Ephemeral New York)

After 20 years and two locations, Park Slope’s gay bar Excelsior will close on July 31. This is the second closure due to rising rents. (Brooklyn Paper)

A sealed arrest record is supposed to reduce the unjust and disproportionately burdensome effect of those records on minorities. The NYPD has decided to have its own interpretation of the law. (Gothamist)

Congrats to this year’s Excellence in Design winners, which “reflect the very best of design in public works, housing, and libraries, parks, and public art.” (Curbed)

Notice something new floating around the city this week? The Sing for Hope pianos are back, celebrating their 500th piano. You’ve got until June 23 to find a piano in the city before they are donated to schools, healthcare facilities, and community centers. (Untapped Cities)

The NYPD is withholding its lists of which officers work at which precincts, claiming stating who is working where would endanger public safety. A lawsuit from the Legal Aid Society will decide if that reasoning is valid. (Patch)

A Midtown fender bender is not news, but it is when one of the cars is driven by Tracy Morgan and it’s a new $2 million Bugatti. (Gothamist)

It seems former prosecutor in the Central Park Five case Linda Fairstein doesn’t know about the Streisand Effect. The woman who coerced confessions from children about a crime they didn’t commit took to the internet to defend her honor after being forced to resign from Vassar’s board of trustees from a student body that did not want her there because of her involvement in the case. (The Root)

Where to eat something quick if you’re running late to a Broadway show. (The Infatuation)

How long would you stay in a rent-stabilized apartment if you could? Ed Higgins has been renting an apartment on Ludlow St for 43 years. His rent in 1976 was $100 a month and now it’s still under $600. (6sqft)

Polly Trottenberg, a voice of sanity on the MTA’s board, is resigning effective immediately upon being replaced. She was a de Blasio nomination in 2014 and has been highly critical of Governor Cuomo’s initiatives in the past. She did not state a reason for her resignation. (Politico)

What’s going on with the F train this week? A dead baby shark (do do do do do do) was found on an F train platform in Manhattan. (Gothamist)

The city’s Fair Fares program has 50,000 participants, and a big help was the expansion of the program in April. The program will expand in 2020 to any New Yorker living under the poverty line. (Curbed)

The de Blasio administration has begun seizing ice cream trucks from owners who are accused of evading nearly $4.5 million in fines. It seems that shell corporations aren’t just for our presidents anymore, because 76 ice cream trucks changed hands between shell corporations to avoid paying traffic and parking tickets. The city has seized 46 trucks so far. (Patch)

It seems the one thing the city’s politicians can agree on is the new entrance designs for Penn Station. (Downtown Express)

ThriveNYC provides no tangible support for the city’s students and councilmember Mark Treyger is calling for a “significant investment” in social and emotional services for students. There are over one million students in the city’s public schools and only 1,335 social workers, 2,958 guidance counselors and 560 school psychologists supporting those students. There are more safety agents than all those combined. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A paid witness used by the defense of Daniel Pantaleo, the officer accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, claimed Garner’s death could not have been caused by the hold. He was not present when it occurred and his appearance in court was paid by the defense. (amNY)

Over 100,000,000 have seen The Lion King on Broadway with over 9,000 performances, which are two staggering numbers. (CBS New York)

Councilman Antonio Reynoso announced he is running for Brooklyn Borough President once Eric Adams’ term limits have run out in 2021. (Brooklyn Paper)

After months of presentations and public feedback, the MTA announced a draft plan to improve the Bronx’s buses by improving speeds, reliability and streamlining routes that haven’t changed in decades. (Curbed)

The lawsuit against the MTA that would force the construction of elevators whenever a station is closed for improvements was given the go-ahead in the state’s supreme court, stating the MTA is not about the city’s Human Rights Law’s prohibition of discrimination based on disability. (amNY)

15 stellar spots for raw bar. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 5, 2019 – The “Pole Dancing Rats Are So Last Week” Edition

The future of Sunnyside Yards, dollar oysters, the prettiest block in the city, Jeff Bezos buys an apartment, the appeal of a rear-facing apartment and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Is this a video of cops fighting each other in Harlem, or is it a video of people dressed as cops fighting each other in Harlem? That stupid question is what the NYPD would like you to ask. (Gothamist)

Rumors keep saying that New York City Transit president Andy Byford is on his way out the door. Someone tell Andy, because he reportedly just signed a new lease. (Gothamist)

Let’s not forget the cold history between the governor and Byford, who spend the first few months of the year never speaking to one another directly. (Second Ave Sagas)

Maybe Andy should leave. Governor Cuomo is cutting over three billion from the MTA budget over the next three years. (Daily News)

Pole dancing rats on the subway are so last week. This week it’s all about a loose bat on the F Train. (Gothamist)

The views ain’t great, the light is limited, but it’s hard to fight the appeal of a rear-facing apartment. (StreetEasy)

The Yemeni bodega owners’ protest of the New York Post has cost the newspaper an estimated $270,000 since the protest started two months ago. (The Indypendent)

Get ready wave hello to Rikers Island’s latest prisoner: Paul Manafort. (Patch)

The Death By Audio Arcade’s new home at Wonderville is open on the border of Bushwick and Bed-Stuy. Take a look at photos of the inside. (Gothamist)

Bumble is opening a cafe and wine in Soho this fall. According to Bumble, it’ll also be a place to hold business meetings and meet friends, so if you see a non-single friend in there, don’t freak out. (6sqft)

Apparently, NYC is a great place for a staycation. That’s a great suggestion because people keep dying on Mount Everest. (Patch)

Linda Fairstein, one of the lead prosecutors of the Central Park Five case, resigned her position at Vassar after a student petition with over 10,000 signatures was asking for her full removal. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’ve been asking yourself “electric mopeds, smart cars, bikes, what’s next?” San Francisco is about to receive rentable pogo sticks. (Curbed)

Rent is high, but at least we’re not San Francisco. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re pool hunting this summer, don’t forget to check out Roosevelt Island’s Manhattan Park Pool Club. (Curbed)

Bluestockings in the Lower East Side gets the Atlas Obscura treatment. (Atlas Obscura)

Pastis has reopened after a five-year hiatus. (NY Times)

He couldn’t get a three billion dollar tax break, but Jeff Bezos willing to pay $80 million for a 17,000 square foot apartment in 212 Fifth Ave. (The Real Deal)

10 important lighthouses in the city. Honestly, can you think of one lighthouse in the city? You’re probably surprised there’s enough for a list. (6sqft)

A brief history of SummerStage in Central Park. (Gothamist)

New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams was arrested during a tenants-rights protest in Albany. (Patch)

Eight people have been arrested as part of the city’s crackdown of fake parking placards. Maybe next they’ll address abuse of legitimate placards. (amNY)

Declawing cats is now illegal in the state of New York. (NY Times)

The whole Governors Ball situation just keeps getting worse. The latest is accusations that the guards used excessive force. (BrooklynVegan)

Leonard Swanson, an NYPD officer, was suspended after allegedly choking his girlfriend on Monday night. (Gothamist)

Station Square: “The Prettiest Block in New York” (NY Mag)

2019 could be the busiest year for the city’s skyline. 16 towers are being planned or are currently under construction that top out at over 1,000 feet. To give perspective, there are currently only nine towers in the city at that height. (NY Times)

Could the Sunnyside Yards project become the next Hudson Yards? With a possible 24,000 new apartments built over the railroad yard decks, is a second Hudson Yards a reasonable idea for a borough that already has Long Island City’s luxury housing and could the project still happen without the inclusion of luxury housing? (The Indypendent)

Dollar oyster deals in the city, mapped. (Eater)

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