The Briefly for July 31, 2019 – The “Getting Paid Not to Show Up to Work” Edition

Triple-digit heat in subway stations, the MTA is accused of discrimination, de Blasio denies the Brownsville shooting was a “mass shooting,” dine-in movie theaters, and more in today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Balance your anger with hope and vision appears to be the message from Danny Harris, the new executive director of Transportation Alternatives, the largest advocacy group for better bicycling, walking, and public transit. In an interview with Streetsblog, he comes across more pragmatist than angry bike guy yelling at people on the Brooklyn Bridge. (Streetsblog)

Could hackers bring the city’s streets to a halt? Yes, and here’s how according to the journal Physical Review. (Patch)

Queens Community Board 2 rejected a plan to add 100 apartments to the development that replaced 5Pointz in Long Island City. (Curbed)

A state audit proved what every New Yorker already assumed: the MTA’s projects are plagued by overruns. Contractors were paid and sometimes didn’t show up, design problems lead to delays, and nearly everything costs more than budgeted. (Curbed)

Can brand-new bar with a wine selection and a $6 Miller High Life be considered a dive? (Grub Street)

A tribute to Arcade Bakery, “one of New York’s best bakeries hiding in plain sight,” which closes its doors for good on August 2. (Grub Street)

A town hall centered on rent laws has the potential to be contentious enough before a bunch of anti-vaccination idiots decide to commandeer the room. (The Villager)

Denizens of Coney Island are protesting one of two options for a city ferry dock in an attempt to preserve a fishing area. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A preview of the Gansevoort Peninsula, a 5.5-acre space and the future home of Manhattan’s first public beach. (The Villager)

Was the shooting in Brownsville a mass shooting? According to the mayor and failing presidential hopeful, no. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for more anti-violence funding and not more police after last weekend’s shooting in Brownsville. As he put it, “If police could solve the problem, it would be solved already.” (Gothamist)

Video: Who preserves the MoMA’s vintage electronic art? Meet television repairman Chi-Tien Lui. (Viewing NYC)

When the NY Times suggests going to the East River for “the freshest fish,” you should note Pete Wells is reviewing The Fulton and not suggesting catching and eating your lunch. (NY Times)

Is this marker in Woodside, Queens really the center of NYC? (6sqft)

A new mural in NoMad pays tribute to Evelyn Nesbit, aka “The Gilded Lady,” an actor, model, and New Yorkers whose life would be considered scandalous today, let alone in the early 1900s. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA is facing claims that three of its agents discriminated against a black woman wearing a hijab earlier this year. (amNY)

The person who doored Em Samolewicz, the act that lead to her death, was given a summons for $133, but the truck driver who hit and killed her remains uncharged. (Streetsblog)

Let that Kubrick obsessed friend of yours know that a comprehensive 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit is coming to the Museum Of The Moving Image. (Gothamist)

When a pool and gym isn’t enough, luxury buildings are turning towards amenities like private IMAX screens, Turkish baths, a wine tasting room, and private driveways. (StreetEasy)

It’s not uncommon for a subway station to hit triple digits in the summer. (Viewing NYC)

The Global Citizen Festival announced its 2019 lineup with Queen + Adam Lambert, Alicia Keys, and Carole King among the headliners. Unlike OZY Fest, a festival in Central Park in late September has a low chance of being canceled due to heat. (BrooklynVegan)

G train operator Eric Boyo saved a woman’s life by pulling the emergency brake while pulling into the Fulton Street station after discovering a woman was on the tracks. (amNY)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is taking its advocacy fight against a proposed building complex with a new exhibit called “Fight for Sunlight.” (amNY)

The New York City Community Garden Coalition is protesting the city’s new four-year agreements citing overly restrictive rules and regulations. As a result, less than half of the city’s 550 gardens have signed leases. (amNY)

A look at the new technologies that the MTA will be piloting. Most of the startups are focused on attempting to make eventual failures and crowding easier to anticipate and communicate. (Curbed)

Governor Cuomo tried to hide the real reason the former MTA chairman Joseph Lhota quit last November. The real reason was the state’s ethics watchdog determined he couldn’t do his job and avoid conflicts of interest with his work outside the MTA. (amNY)

A definitive guide to the city’s dine-in movie theaters. (Eater)

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The Briefly for July 18, 2019 – The “Act Like a Summer Goth to Stay Cool” Edition

There have been two additional ConEd blackouts this week, will electric scooters raise real estate prices, hidden bookstores, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Meet the landlords challenging the new rent reforms. (The Real Deal)

Did you know you can see pieces of the Berlin Wall in the city? There’s a piece in an office building, another in Ripley’s Believe It Or Not, another on the Intrepid, but three sections stand together in the United Nations’ garden. (Untapped Cities)

The mayor is “jaded” over ConEd. This follows the Staten Island outage, the Upper West Side outage and a third reported outage in Coney Island all in the same week. He urged New Yorkers to set air conditioners at 78 to help lighten the load for everyone. (amNY)

We have entered the stages of a heat emergency across the city. The official advice is that if you don’t have to be outside or in the sun, pretend you’re a goth teen and stay indoors. If you don’t have air conditioning, the city has 500 cooling centers you have access to. (Curbed)

El Chapo was sentenced to life in prison, putting his career in crime and also the woes caused by his constant crossing of the Brooklyn Bridge to travel between prison and the courthouse under police escort, to an end. (NY Times)

Here’s a map of the city’s cooling centers. (6sqft)

The night that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldren stepped foot on the moon, there was a viewing party in Central Park. The “Moon-In” showed just how moon-crazy the city had gotten. (6sqft)

Nothing quite like a rush-hour breakdown of MetroCard machines to really instill confidence that the MTA will get the OMNY contactless payment right. The MetroCard systems stopped accepting credit cards and the MTA’s Twitter account announced the issue five minutes after it was fixed. Great job all around. (Patch)

When the plastic bag ban takes hold, it only pertains to grocery and big-box stores. Some advocates say it doesn’t go far enough, but the city will feel the collective pain together in March. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The story of BK Yoga Club, an inclusive, body-positive yoga studio in Dumbo, run by Alicia Ferguson and Paris Alexandra. (Bushwick Daily)

The city firefighter that was arrested last month for being caught on video seemingly trying to run over a cyclist is back on the job following his one-month suspension. Further disciplinary action may follow. (Streetsblog)

The top ten hidden bookstores in the city. (Untapped Cities)

This seems like a great weekend to have brunch reservations in order to minimize the amount of time spent waiting for a table outside. 30 great brunch spots that take reservations. (The Infatuation)

Take a look inside Pomander Walk with this house for same, the exclusive 1920s Tudor-style gated community on the Upper West Side. For a bit over $2 million, it can be yours. (6sqft)

The chief business officer at the electric scooter company Lime was boasting that access to electric scooters means more access to bikes and scooters would mean the city would become more accessible, which raise real estate prices. Is that an argument for or against scooters? (The Real Deal)

Seen a bunch of Waldos around the city today? There’s a reason for that. (amNY)

The Time Out Market food hall had its doors shut by the Department of Health after it failed a restaurant inspection and hasn’t re-opened since. They are working to address the issues pointed out by their 102 point violation before they can reopen. (Brooklyn Paper)

At this point, nothing the mayor says or does should be able to disappoint us, but he keeps finding new ways to do instill a feeling of malaise to anyone who hears him speaking. The latest eye-roll comes from calls to have Officer Daniel Pantaleo fired for his role in Eric Garner’s death. (NY Times)

Gossip Girl is already being rebooted. (Huff Post)

There have been at least eight ICE raids across the city in the last five days. Do not open your doors for law enforcement if they do not have the proper paperwork to compel you. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

20 standout restaurants and bars in Prospect Heights. (Eater)

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The Briefly for July 5, 2019 – The “We’re Headed for a Cabán/Katz Recount” Weekend Edition

The MTA’s weekend subway plans, congrats to Joey Chestnut, our absentee mayor continues to be absentee, Cash Cab is back, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

I hope everyone had a great 4th of July, regardless if you celebrated or not. July 4th was a cause for celebration for The Briefly as well. It’s the one year anniversary of the first email sent by The Briefly. Thank you for being a reader.

You might think of it as a holiday weekend, but the MTA has other plans. 12 subway lines have planned disruptions this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Tiffany Cabán was 1,100 votes ahead of Melinda Katz on election night. As of July 4, she was 20 votes behind. Queens is headed for a manual recount. (NY Times)

More than 2,500 affidavit ballots were rejected and the Cabán campaign will be fighting to have them counted. This is the 2000 presidential election all over again. (Politico)

Congrats to Joey Chestnut on winning his 12th hot dog eating championship, with 71 hot dogs in 10 minutes. In Times Square, that would cost roughly $1,500. (amNY)

Despite what you experienced on July 4th, fireworks and sparklers continue to be illegal in New York. (amNY)

After multiple years and nearly a half billion dollars in renovations, full service on the N train has been restored in Brooklyn. (The City)

The panel of experts overseeing the rehab of the BQE hasn’t made any decisions, but have intimated that the plans the city has put forward, which include replacing the Brooklyn Promenade with a temporary highway, have little chance of being approved. (Brooklyn Paper)

Our mayor, who spent July 4th in Iowa, said “I’m a half-glass-full kind of guy” when it comes to his polling numbers, which are in the toilet. His office in New York, which is been full empty, as he pretends he’s not wasting time and money in Iowa. He missed the funeral for 9/11 responder and NYPD detective Lou Alvarez and failed to preside over the weigh-in for Nathan’s hot dog eating competition, something Mayor Bloomberg did 11 of the 12 years he was mayor. (Gothamist)

26 (kind of obvious, but still a solid list) things to do in the city this summer. (Curbed)

The Central Park bomber has been at-large for three years. (Gothamist)

There are 25 horses in the Prospect Park Stable, and each “manufacture” 75 pounds of poop daily, bringing the total to nearly a daily ton of horseshit. The owner of the stable has begun turning the manure into compost and gifting it to the nonprofit Red Hook Farms. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Got a hankering for strawberries? Here’s a list of where to get yourself a strawberry dessert. (Grub Street)

Bushwick’s The Notorious B.I.G. and Alfred Hitchcock mural was vandalized. A video was taken of the vandal, but they haven’t been found (Bushwick Daily)

Community Board 7 voted to approve a bike lane for Central Park West. The neighborhood will lose 400 parking spots in the process, but the board weighed those parking spots vs the life of Madison Lyden, who died after she was forced from the current bike lane by a parked cab and hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

Eliot Engel, who represents parts of the Bronx, Westchester, and Yonkers in the House of Representatives, is the next New York Democrat to be primaried from the left. His challengers cite is conservative views on Israel, the Middle East, and education among some of the reasons they feel he needs to be challenged. (Politico)

The city’s sheriff arrested Anthony Medina, a debt collector who allegedly scammed on cab drivers by pretending to be a city marshall to harass drivers into giving up their medallions and cabs and occasionally shook them down for cash. (Gothamist)

The East Village’s Mikey Likes It is closed after a tax-related seizure last week. (EV Grieve)

Cash Cab is back and will be filming in NYC this summer. (amNY)

The removal of the citizenship question from the 2020 census is a win for New York, as state Attorney General Letitia James’s office helped lead the charge against it. (Patch)

Four neighborhoods, Crown Heights, Bed-Stuy, East New York, and Brownsville account for 23% of the city’s shootings this year. Despite a trend towards less violent crime in the city, shootings and reported rapes citywide have increased this year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Where to eat and what to do at the South Street Seaport. (amNY)

The principal of LaGuardia High School, Dr. Lisa Mars, has stepped down following a sit-in by the students and years of protests by students, teachers, and faculty. A divergence from the school’s mission is what drive the protests and the vote of “no confidence” in May. (Gothamist)

Serial subway groper Giovanni Verdelli has been arrested 70 times and the NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill is calling for his permanent banning from the subways. (Downtown Express)

The ultimate guide to Penn Station. (Curbed)

The man who tossed piss onto two transit workers in April, Brandon Jobson, was arrested and charged with two counts of assault. You’re in trouble, Brandon. (Gothamist)

The entire Brooklyn Congressional delegation called for the firing of Customer and Border Protection officers after posts in a private Facebook group with 9,000 members surfaces with threats to Congressmember Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and insensitive comments about the ongoing crisis at the United States’ southern border. (Kings County Politics)

Spots for a big group hang outside. (The Infatuation)

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