The Briefly for April 7, 2020 – The “No, We Are Not Burying Dead Bodies in City Parks” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor ends his open streets program, a guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery, the hardest temp job in the city, weird things people are doing, & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 64˚
Light rain overnight.

Punk Island, one of the city’s best DIY and free music festivals, is postponed from its usual June date. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: A beautifully shot montage of a barren city, titled “The New Normal Quarantine.” (Matt Chirico)

No matter what you read, the city does not have plans to bury the dead in public parks. The rumor originated by Mark D. Levine, the Chair of New York City Council health committee, who spent the entire day on Twitter walking back the mess that he created. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s official body count from COVID-19 of 2,738 is likely a vast undercount. On a “normal” day, about 20-25 New Yorkers die in their homes, but in our new reality, about 200 people are dying at home on a daily basis. Those bodies are not tested for COVID-19, so they are not listed as a confirmed case. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

City schools will continue remote learning on Passover and Good Friday this year, completely removing spring break from the calendar. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The June Regents exams are canceled. The state is trying to figure out graduation requirements since the Regents is a requirement. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

If the June Regents are canceled, does the June SAT and ACT date stand a chance? (Benjamin Mandile for QNS)

A look inside the slow collapse of the city’s catering industry. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

If you’re having trouble understanding what being six feet apart looks like, the city is installing signs showing you how far to stay away from your fellow New Yorker. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I don’t think that when Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee accepted a temporary job that she’d be imagining she’d be overseeing the worst-hit county in the country with an election date that was already postponed once. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

If you’re looking for the slightest bit of good news, it seems like the growth of the novel coronavirus outbreak in New York City might be slowing down. (Ann Choi and Yoav Gonen for The City)

Three cheers to the landlords across the city choosing to not demand rent this month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The first jail inmate to test positive for COVID-19 at Rikers Island, Michael Tyson (not the one you’re thinking of), died on Sunday while awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

The New York Public Library and WYNC are teaming together to launch a virtual book club, the club is virtual, the book is real. The first book is James McBride’s Deacon King Kong. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Yes, a tiger in the Bronx Zoo has COVID-19. Your pet is probably okay. Just treat them as an extension of yourself. Keep distance from other people and dogs. (James Gorman for NY Times)

Tuesday night will be a pink supermoon, climbing to its highest point at 10:35 pm. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What’s harder than finding a good one-bedroom in a great neighborhood that doesn’t break the bank? Trying to order groceries for delivery. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Your best bets for grocery delivery in the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New York is on PAUSE through April 29, a two-week extension. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Video: It’s a touch of history from the end of World War I in Woodhaven. The Memorial Trees were planted after the first world war and were mostly forgotten to time until a few years ago. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

It seems that we’re not good at staying home, according to our location data. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Maybe that’s why 311 received over 4,000 complaints about a lack of social distancing in its first week of receiving complaints. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York Cliché, a favorite of The Briefly, is looking for pitches and is paying for posts. She wrote a great piece about getting tickets to late-night talk shows, but then the world went to hell so I never posted it. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

Reimagined NYC road signs for our new lives by artist Dylan Coonrad. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A list of NYC restaurants raising funds to feed healthcare workers. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art released a new lineup of free digital programming. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Satire: NYPD Razes Central Park Hospital Tents For Violating Outdoor Encampment Laws. (The Onion)

Performance activist Billy Talen was arrested after planting a rainbow flag on Sunday in protesting Samaritan’s Purse, the anti-gay religious group behind Central Park’s field hospital. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor is ending his “open streets” program after it wasn’t popular enough to justify the heavy NYPD presence at each closed street. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A running list of Mayor de Blasio’s coronavirus response missteps. (Elizabeth Kim, Jen Carlson, and Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 major proposals not included in the state’s new budget. #1? Marijuana legalization. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve done in quarantine? (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The pandemic guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Lisa Rosenblum for submitting today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 1, 2020 – The “Biggest Jerk in New York City” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD is using unmanned drones to enforce physical distancing, Dr. Anthony Fauci’s NYC roots, photos inside the Central Park field hospital, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 52˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Praise of the calming ritual of the cocktail hour, and a recipe for a gin and tonic. (Adam Platt for Grub Street)

“Despite the logistical isolation and the very real physical distress, however, there were moments of connection that kept me from feeling truly alone.” –How Kelli Dunham fell ill to COVID-19 and lived to tell about it. (Kelli Dunham for HuffPost)

How to safely order restaurant delivery and takeout. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The MTA is struggling to maintain a full staff, as 2,200 subway and bus workers are in quarantine. Even if they wanted to expand service to reduce congestion, they couldn’t. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Baruch Feldheim, a complete asshole. Baruch faces five years in prison and fines of up to $350,000 for price-gouging N95 masks and personal protective gear. When the FBI came to arrest him, he claimed to have novel coronavirus and tried to cough on them. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Photos: “But the thoroughfares have been abandoned. The energy that once crackled along the concrete has eased. The throngs of tourists, the briskly striding commuters, the honking drivers have mostly skittered away.” This city was not meant to be empty. (Corina Knoll and photographers Bryan Derballa, Mark Abramson, Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi, Gabriela Bhaskar, Marian Carrasquero, Juan Arredondo, Jonah Markowitz, Stephen Speranza, Gareth Smit, Sarah Blesener, Victor J. Blue, Jeenah Moon, Desiree Rios, Jose A. Alvarado Jr., and Ryan Christopher Jones for NY Times)

Looking at Dr. Anthony Fauci’s Brooklyn roots. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

The city is extending its car-free pilot program through Sunday but won’t expand the number of streets closed off to vehicular traffic. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral will be closed off to the public on Easter and Palm Sunday, but you can catch them both on WPIX and on YouTube. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows is going to be converted to a temporary 350-bed medical facility. The original plan was to house non-COVID-19 patients, but the final plans haven’t been made. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The Central Park COVID-19 field hospital. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Job searching is tough enough without a global pandemic. Here are a few things to do to help your search. (Mindy Stern for amNewYork Metro)

It’s a seven-course $600 dinner party, but you have to cook it yourself. This is what fine dining looks like in 2020. (Erika Adams for Eater)

New York state’s restaurants lost nearly $2 billion in revenue in the first 22 days of March. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

This pandemic may be troubling us humans, but this expectant mother goose in the Gowanus Canal is living her best life. (Pardon Me for Asking)

When you go to the grocery store or order food, please remember that the people working to provide you that food wants to be infected just as little as you do. (Daniela Galarza for Grub Street)

Photos: A dramatic black-and-white Carroll Gardens, bereft of its usual life. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

Actor and comedian Paul Scheer (The League, Veep) on his quarantine diet. (Paul Scheer for Grub Street)

An interview with Deborah Feldman, the subject of Netflix mini-series and New York Times bestseller ‘Unorthodox,’ who left her ultra-Orthodox Jewish community for a new life in Berlin. (Marisa Mazria-Katz for NY Times)

Video: The NYPD is using unmanned drones to monitor physical distancing, or the lack thereof. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 Bronx restaurants to take out from during COVID-19. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

What Time Out’s editors are reading while staying physically distant. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

RIP Michael Sorkin and William Helmreich, two of the city’s most prolific walkers. Helmreich was the author of The New York Nobody Knows walked 6,000 miles in an ongoing effort to walk every street in New York and Sorkin was the author of Twenty Minutes in Manhattan, which detailed a walk from Greenwich Village to Tribeca. Both taken by COVID-19. (Jake Bittle for Curbed)

Parks@Home is here to bring the city’s parks to you. The new series features virtual walks in the park with Urban Park Rangers. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The state hired more than 700 additional people to answer unemployment-related phone calls, with hundreds more being hired and trained, and they’re still having trouble keeping up with the demand. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The city shut down ten playgrounds throughout all five boroughs, because, as a city, we remain poor at physical distancing.

The city’s Human Rights Commission is investigating the firing of Chris Smalls, the Amazon worker who organized a strike outside of the company’s Staten Island facility on Monday. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The City University of New York is scrambling to distribute as many as 30,000 computers to students, after delaying online classes designed to keep coursework going after coronavirus-prompted campus shutdowns. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

Photos: Inside Woodhaven’s 95-year-old Schmidt’s Candy, making handmade candies for Eater. (James and Karla Murray for 6sqft)

The MoMA is offering free online art courses to help you finally answer the question “is this art?” (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Nine tips on how to create the quintessential NYC balcony garden. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Thanks to Micah Eames for today’s featured photo from Crown Heights!

The Briefly for March 30, 2020 – The “Buying Whiskey for a Good Cause” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Central Park becomes a field hospital for COVID-19 patients, Amazon continues to expand its NYC footprint, you can still move apartments, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 48˚
Drizzle in the morning and afternoon.

Can you move during the pandemic? Yes. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

In September of 2018, a construction crew in Elmhurst accidentally exhumed the mummified remains of a smallpox victim from the 1850s. Was that a bad omen? (Ephemeral New York)

The New York Bacon and Beer Classic was rescheduled to September 26. Isn’t it nice to think that life will return to normal at some point in the future? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Wheated is selling off its whiskey collection to help its laid-off employees. If you were looking to get your hands on some great whiskey at a reasonable price in Ditmas Park, you know where to go. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Maybe whiskey’s not your thing? Some restaurants have merch available. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The definition of what consists of a “real emergency” has changed. With a record volume of 911 calls, the FDNY is asking anyone who is thinking of calling 911 for coronavirus-related reasons to call a doctor first. (Jenna Amatulli for HuffPost)

Photos: Inside the new 1,000-bed Javits Center hospital. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Aqueduct Racetrack, the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal, the CUNY College of Staten Island, and the New York Expo Center will become temporary hospital sites that will add an additional 4,000 hospital beds to the city. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Central Park’s East Meadow is being used as an emergency field hospital for COVID-19 patients. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Elon Musk is sending 615 ventilators to the city, wait, why did Elon Musk have 615 ventilators to start? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Ample Hills is laying off all 101 of its workers. This, unlike their recent bankruptcy announcement, is related to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

Photos: New York’s first complete week of pandemic dining. (Gary He for Eater)

It started as a list of the best things to eat in New York, now it’s a list of 101 things we hope we can eat again soon. (Grub Street)

Here are all the Michelin-rated restaurants in the city that are now offering takeout or delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

If you’ve always wanted a pet, there is quite literally no time like the present to adopt one. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

The bars are closed, the restaurants shuttered, the gyms are barren, but there is a place for some New Yorkers to be social and remain physically distant: the stoop. (Doug Gordon for Curbed)

Con Ed suspended checking gas and electric meters, so if someone comes to your door claiming to be from Con Ed, ignore them. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The state has put an end to “non-essential” construction, limiting active construction to building hospitals, infrastructure projects, affordable housing, and homeless shelters. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

The Empire State building is working with Z100 to put together a light show every night at 9pm with new shows debuting on Friday nights. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

So how did the first week of remote learning go? (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

Add the New York Philharmonic to the list of organizations streaming free performances. Check out past performances on Thursday nights. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s first map with any COVID-19 information is exceptionally unhelpful. Par for the course from the de Blasio administration. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Amazon bought the Lord & Taylor Building at 424 Fifth Avenue for one billion dollars. Amazon continues to expand its NYC footprint, despite not getting a ridiculous tax break from the city and state. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

Photos: Turns out we’re still pretty bad at social distancing in city parks. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The NYPD was authorized to give $250 – $500 fines to people who aren’t maintaining social distance, but only if they fail to disperse when ordered or if officers find people in the same place twice. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Pregnant women will not be forced to give birth without having someone with them. A new executive order from Governor Cuomo breaks any ban that was previously put in place by hospitals. It’s amazing how quickly the government can move when it is motivated. (Katie Van Syckle and Christina Caron for NY Times)

The state’s tax deadline and the presidential primary were moved. The tax deadline to July 15 and the primary to June 23. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Along with the presidential primary, local elections were moved, creating questions about how the elections for Queens borough president and open city council seats. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte and Christine Chung for The City)

One week after calling for a complete lockdown of the city, Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for the city to close all parks and playgrounds. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Over the weekend, Rhode Island restricted access to the state for New Yorkers and then lifted their restrictions after Cuomo threatened to sue. (Bill Mahoney for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the “new” Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who is starting to appear much more like the rest of the democrats than her previous spitfire self. (Alex Thompson and Holly Otterbein for Politico)

A brief list of notable people who have tested positive for COVID-19 this weekend: MTA Chairman and CEO Pat Foye, Knicks owner James Dolan, Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz. All three are isolating and seem to be doing okay. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro, Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro, and Erin Durkin for Politico)

17 Thai delivery and takeout picks. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Dylan for today’s featured photo in Domino Park, which accurately captures how we’re all feeling.