The Briefly for November 14, 2019 – The “Problem Goes Deeper Than Policing Churros” Edition

Virginity tests, the NYPD’s illegal child fingerprint database was destroyed, the food at Wegmans gets reviewed, OMNY expands, pie shops, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The punishment for killing a woman with a car? $750 and a suspended license. (Streetsblog)

“I am calling on the governor to immediately remove these additional officers from the MTA and put that money into actually improving the system. The governor cannot expect the public to pay the fare when the State is refusing to hold up its own financial responsibility.” – City Council Member Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn (Streetsblog)

Will the 500 new police officers on buses and in subway stations prevent 33 million evaded fares a year for ten years? That figure, of course, doesn’t include any lawsuits that spawn from arrests made by those officers. That’s the monetary argument, but if the surge of officers is about fare evasion and protecting MTA workers, why are the headlines about churro ladies and teenagers selling candy? It’s about the kind of city we want to be. (Second Ave Sagas)

A look at the new Tompkins Square Playground’s equipment for kids with special needs. (EV Grieve)

The City Council voted to give themselves a $36,000 raise, but haven’t been nearly as generous with their staff, who make $47,784 annually on average. There has been conversations about unionization to improve salaries. (Politico)

A vegetarian restaurant that only serves one item, but is it any good? Yes is the answer. (Gothamist)

The city owns most of the land in the amusement area of Coney Island, but Central Amusement International (owners of Luna Park) operates the lease on the boardwalk shops. In addition to rent, they take 10% of their overall sales. In recent years they’ve been favoring their own games, shops, and food options over mom and pop shops. This is a private business deciding on the future of businesses who are on land owned by the city. Lola Star, the woman behind the boardwalk shop and roller discos across Brooklyn is stepping up and resurrecting the advocacy group Save Coney Island. (Coney Island Blog)

Every rental building in Manhattan ranked by price. (StreetEasy)

The Charging Bull isn’t moving… yet. Despite the mayor talking big in public about how it has to be moved due to Bowling Green being an unsafe place for that high number of visitors it receives, a location to move it to was never decided on. For now, the bull remains. (Gothamist)

The Coalition for Affordable Homes is introducing a proposal for a Small Home Anti-Speculation Tax that would impose a 15-20% tax on property transferred to a new owner within two years of ownership. While they may not prevent flipping houses, it would reinvest in affordable housing in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

After 24,200 calls to 911 since June using a burner cellphone, Yogit Persaud was arrested. Each time she would call, the police or FDNY or both would have to respond to the claim, regardless if they knew it was from her and it was a false report. Persaud purports the NYPD has conspired against her. She was arrested for making a false emergency report, obstructing governmental administration, and aggravated harassment. (Gothamist)

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, leader of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and current investigator of sexual abuse the Buffalo diocese, sexually assaulted an 11-year-old altar boy when he was a priest in New Jersey in the 70s, according to a new lawsuit. (NY Times)

Billionaire Barry Diller’s public park island off Pier 55 has a new name and it’s “Little Island.” A modest name considering the price tag ballooned from $35 million to $250 million. (Gothamist)

Junior’s Law, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is a bill that will reimburse small businesses owners the cost of a panic button, which could have saved the teenager’s life. The bill has 31 supporters in the City Council. (amNewYork)

Greenwich Village Chelsea Chamber of Commerce wants you to remember that there are still stores that are open left on Bleecker Street to shop at and has declared November 23 “Shop Bleecker Day,” where participating shops will provide deals and discounts. (amNewYork)

Virginity tests are still a thing in the year 2019. A bill was introduced to ban them in New York. This is, of course, coming into headlines now because T.I. admitted in an interview that he forces his 18-year-old daughter to undergo hymen checks annually, which is awful. (Gothamist)

While Staten Island is still a part of New York City (you can read about that in yesterday’s edition of The Briefly), it has a new dockless bike program. Beryl will operate 1,000 bikes across the island starting in the spring. (Streetsblog)

Take a look inside (renderings of) Disney’s upcoming Hudson Square HQ. (amNewYork)

The governor gave National Grid two weeks to hook up new customers of he will revoke their franchise to supply gas to New York City. (Gothamist)

The NYPD’s illegal database of children’s fingerprints was confirmed to be destroyed after a years-long investigation into it by the Legal Aid Society. (Patch)

“Wegmans is not good enough to be your destination food court.” Eater reviews the food at Wegmans. (Eater)

OMNY is hitting more subway stations next month, including Penn Station. (6sqft)

A guide to OMNY. (Curbed)

The city fines landlords for lead, but rarely ever collects. Even the highest estimates put the figure at 10%. (Gothamist)

The new age for tobacco or e-cigarette purchases is now 21 years old. (amNewYork)

Seven ways to fix your overheated apartment. Yes, “open the windows” is number one. (StreetEasy)

14 spectacular pie shops. (Eater)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 11, 2019 – The “MTA Can’t Ruin Mercury’s Transit” Edition

The 28th cyclist murdered by drivers, Bloomberg is already the most disliked candidate, the new power lunch, more NYCHA problems, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Another Monday, another week of late night subway disruptions. This week’s inconveniences hit the 2, 3, 4, 6, A, D, E, L, Q, and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Mercury will be visibly in transit in front of the sun from 7:30am to 1pm today. It’s probably easiest to see on space.com, but if you’ve still got your eclipse gear you can give that a try. (Time Out)

Retired Brigadier General Dr. Loree Sutton is the newest face to announce her candidacy for mayor in 2021 as a Democrat. General Sutton is the founding Commissioner for the Department of Veterans’ Services. (amNewYork)

The 28th cyclist to be murdered by someone behind the wheel of a vehicle was my friend Matthew Travis Palacios. Matt was riding his bike in the bike lane on 1st Ave at 2:30am on Saturday when a dump truck made an illegal turn, hit him and drive way, leaving him severely injured. He was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead. I knew Matt through our involvement in local pro wrestling where he was always someone who made me feel welcome and whose star shined bright. He described pro wrestling as his lifeline. “Every night I come home and hear how someone got shot… like, what if I’m next? But with wrestling I feel like, finally, I have a shot.” RIP Matt. (Heavy)

Michael Bloomberg isn’t even officially in the 2020 race and he’s the most disliked candidate among Democrats. Despite that, he’s already polling at 4%, higher than Mayor de Blasio ever did. (Politico)

That dislike may be earned. When Mayor de Blasio took mayorship of the city it was after his “tale of two cities” campaign which highlighted the inequality created during the Bloomberg administration. (NY Times)

Is the Montauk Cutoff Queens’ High Line? It’s near the Sunnyside Yards, which is supposed to be Queens’ Hudson Yards. Maybe we should just let Queens be its own thing? (Forgotten New York)

It started as a thread of tweets and its ending with an investigation into Goldman Sachs by a New York regulator. For some reason, the algorithm which controls spending limits on Apple Cards, which is managed by Goldman Sachs, assigned a man a credit limit 20x that of his wife, despite her credit score being higher than his. The investigation is into gender bias. (HuffPost)

Salt Bae, the joke that won’t go away, settled a lawsuit with four employees he fired over tip distribution to the tune of $230,000. (Jezebel)

Stop and Frisk, another remnant of the Bloomberg administration, was deemed unconstitutional in 2013. That hasn’t stopped the NYPD, who was caught on video stopping and frisking three young men outside NYCHA buildings without justification. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s surge of police officers on the subways is going swimmingly. Here’s a video of NYPD officers removing a man who fell asleep on the platform waiting for an L train from the station. He wasn’t arrested. (Gothamist)

Having vanquished all other crime in the city, four NYPD officers handcuffed a woman selling churros at the Broadway Junction subway station and confiscated her churros and cart. (Gothamist)

Andy Byford, president of the New York City Transit Authority, has a new nickname: Train Daddy. (Patch)

Train Daddy is bringing bus boarding platforms to 14th St to make bus service even speedier along the street. Each platform will save the time buses take to pull over and stop and also sidewalk space for pedestrians. (amNewYork)

The MTA has signed on to the Paris Climate Accord. As it is pointed out, if the MTA improved its service, it could make the biggest impact on carbon emissions is to improve its service. The city already pledged its commitment to the accord in 2017. (Curbed)

Psychology professor at Kingsborough Community College Joshua Dietz is moonlighting as Josh Neal, a white nationalist and the co-host of a podcast alongside known neo-Nazi and literal punching bag Richard Spencer. (Gothamist)

Flavors of Italy in Manhattan is one of the flavors of restaurants closed by the Health Department last week. (Patch)

23 NYCHA buildings had heat outages this weekend as temperatures flirted with 40 degrees, with the total number of tenants without heat hitting 5,500. (Patch)

The power lunch is dead, long live the new power lunch at Sweetgreen. (Eater)

The NYCHA is spending $363 million to upgrade obsolete boilers, but they won’t be ready to be used until 2023. (The City)

The Charging Bull at Bowling Green is going to be moving. It’s had a hell of a year between being assaulted by a banjo and having a bucket of fake blood dumped on it. The bull will be moved somewhere close to the New York Stock Exchange, maybe to be reunited with the Fearless Girl statue? (amNewYork)

Twenty-seven people were arrested this week for allegedly taking part in a massive $18 million medical insurance fraud scheme, which included bribing 911 operators, medical personnel, and police officers for the confidential information of over 60,000 motor vehicle accident victims. (Gothamist)

Did you get your flu shot? There have been 189 confirmed cases of the flu in the state last week. (Patch)

Mary Frost went to “The Deplorables,” a pro-Trump Broadway charity event, so you didn’t have to. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Spikes, bolts, barriers and more of the city’s hostile architecture. (NY Times)

Dandra is a new sculpture in Tribeca Park of a pair of ten-foot-tell butterfly wings was installed to bring awareness to the trans and non-gender conforming community. It’s by Brazilian artist Robem Robierb, known for making Instagram-friendly art, and named for Dandra dos Santos, a trans woman murdered in Brazil in 2017. (Untapped New York)

Brooklyn’s hottest restaurants for November. (Eater)

The Briefly for October 8, 2019 – The “What to Expect When You Eat at Wegman’s” Edition

No one knows where the money will come from for the MTA’s capital plan, the latest bar and restaurant openings, Brooklyn Bazaar is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

61% of New Yorkers support the emergency ban on flavored vaping, despite a court ruling that halted its enforcement, according to a new poll from Sienna. (lohud)

Jumaane Williams is up for reelection this year, but neither of his opponents qualified to debate him, so if you want to know their stances on citywide issues you’re gonna have to track them down and ask them yourself. (Gotham Gazette)

The man charged with killing four men who are presumed to be homeless in Chinatown, 24-year-old Randy Santos, has confessed to the crimes according to prosecutors. (amNY)

What to expect when you’re eating at Wegman’s. (Eater)

How’s the MTA gonna pay for its $51.5 billion-dollar five-year capital plan? No, seriously, we don’t know yet. (amNY)

A federal judge tossed Trump’s federal lawsuit to block New York from subpoenaing the president’s taxes. (Patch)

Five takeaways from the ruling on Trump’s tax returns. (NY Times)

Say hello to the alcoholic Tide Pod. (Grub Street)

The MTA is ready to start testing new ultra-wideband signaling along the L line, but it’ll run parallel to the current equipment just in case something goes wrong. (Bushwick Daily)

Photos: Atop the infinity pool at the TWA Hotel. (Untapped Cities)

Is the city’s last Dean & Deluca already gone? (Grub Street)

The history of the Guggenheim Museum’s iconic New York City building. (Curbed)

10 of the oldest bars and restaurants in Brooklyn. (Untapped Cities)

The Charging Bull can’t catch a break. As part of the Extinction Rebellion Protest on Monday, the bull was doused in fake (I hope it was fake) blood. This was after last months’ banjo attack that left a gouge in its right horn. (Gothamist)

The steward of Fort Greene Park lays out the reasons for having to replace the trees in the park. Trees, like people, can be assholes. (Brooklyn Paper)

32 bus stops in the city are less than 260 feet apart. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn Bazaar will close at the end of November after the landlord was unwilling to negotiate a new lease. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A look at some of the newest bars and restaurants in the city. (amNY)