The Briefly for March 24, 2020 – The “Quarantine Rainbow Scavenger Hunt” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The first day of remote learning for NYC, C trains temporarily shut down after an MTA worker tests positive for COVID-19, Economy Candy adapts, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

How to access unemployment and other government benefits right now. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

You won’t find a social media presence for Corona Courier, a community pairing bike couriers with people who need to self-quarantine. They deliver based on where their volunteers are located. If you’ve got some time on your hands and a desire to help, this is an opportunity for you. (Nicole Davis for Brooklyn Based)

The mayor is starting to talk about schools being closed for the rest of the year, despite being hopeful about letting students back in on April 20. (East New York News)

Here’s what NYC’s first day of remote learning looked like. (Alex Zimmerman, Christina Veiga, and Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The city’s playgrounds are open. Are they safe? “It would take a Herculean effort every five minutes, literally, that we simply can’t do.” -Mayor de Blasio. (Curtis Brodner for BKLYNER)

If you’ve been seeing rainbows in the windows of apartments around Brooklyn, welcome to the quarantine rainbow scavenger hunt. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Commuting in Corona Times” by Kera Hill is the new subway map that you have to see. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Three depressing charts that spell out the demise of the subways. (Streetsblog)

The work has begun to go through the articles that survived the fire at the MoCA archives on Mulberry St. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Brooklyn has the highest count of positive COVID-19, but so far it hasn’t been included in the state’s plans for a temporary hospital to deal with the sick and Borough President Eric Adams isn’t happy about that. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

How do you enjoy life?” was the note left behind by Robert Herman, photographer, and Tribeca resident, before jumping to his death from his 16th-floor window. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Video: Drone footage of American cities, nearly deserted. (Matt Novak for Gizmodo)

The idea behind closing off some streets to automobile traffic is to alleviate the density in the city’s parks. Think about it like an ongoing block party where everyone has to remain six feet away from each other. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Here’s a list of the streets that TransAlt and Bike New York are calling for closure. The most surprising on the list is the Jackie Robinson Parkway, which also includes the NYC marathon route, NYC street fair routes, summer streets and car-free day streets, and more. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Turns out restaurants that were popular before coronavirus closed all the city’s restaurants are still popular now that we’re in “take-out only” mode. (Gary He for Eater)

Rao’s, NYC’s most exclusive restaurant, is offering take-out for the first time ever. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Does Scott Stringer realize he’s made a The Lox featuring Lil’ Kim and DMX reference when talking about why the census is important? (@NYCComptroller)

The city could be looking at a $6 billion hit during the projected six-month COVID-19 crisis according to City Comptroller Scott Stringer. As far as I can tell, that doesn’t include the $4 billion the MTA is asking for or the $1.9 billion the Port Authority is asking for. (Robert Pozarycki for QNS)

Photos: An empty NYC just before the PAUSE. (Jen Carlson with photos by Gretchen Robinette, Scott Lynch, and David “Dee” Delgado for Gothamist)

The MTA has announced that it has suspended fare collection on all of its local and select bus routes in order to keep its drivers safe from coronavirus. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

I used to work with someone whose weekly routine included taking a lunch break and going to Economy Candy to stock up for her desk and apartment. If you're someone for whom candy is a part of life, Economy Candy is now offering CandyCare Packs to keep you sugared up. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Now is the absolute worst time to open a restaurant, right? Say hello to the brand new Sofia’s Panificio e Vino in Little Italy. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Mike Bloomberg claimed that he’d be paying his campaign staff through November regardless if he dropped out of the race. He dropped out of the race and 2,000 of his former campaign staffers are suing him for fraud in a class-action lawsuit. (Christopher Cadelago for Politico)

Rough Trade NYC closed its online store without an explicitly stated reason. Relatedly, Amazon announced that it was pausing restocking vinyl and CDs, so this could be a supply chain issue. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

RIP Nashom Wooden, aka drag legend Mona Foot, a victim of COVID-19. (Mickey Boardman for Paper)

WABC 770 radio relaunched under a new owner. They had a party on March 16 for the relaunch on March 16, the same day the state limited gatherings to 50 and closed bars, restaurants, and gyms. Look at the photos of these idiots at a party in the radio studio. (amNewYork Metro, with no writer credited)

Community Gardens in the city are closed to the public “effective immediately” and “until further notice.” (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The EPA is evaluating if the Coney Island Creek is eligible to become a Superfund site. The waterway has been polluted for decades after the historical manufacturing of dye and gas in the area. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Gladson Ltd normally supplies Gucci, Paul Smith, Stella McCartney, and others with luxury fabrics, but they’ll be churning out a million facemasks for local hospitals. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk by the Long Island City Waterfront at Hunters Point South Park and Gantry Plaza State Park at night. (ActionKid)

City Harvest is looking for volunteers to pack food for fellow New Yorkers. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

On Monday morning the MTA stopped running C trains after an employee tested positive for COVID-19. 30 workers have tested positive for coronavirus. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The end of the month is coming. Are we going to see a rent freeze? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The list of the best things the editors of Eater ate and drank this week looks vastly different while sheltering-in-place. (Eater)

“I always knew that when the end came, New Yorkers would watch it from a bar. But this was not the end any of us had imagined. Crowding together, not just a survival skill but an engine of the city in normal times, was the most dangerous thing of all.” -Pete Wells for NY Times

The Briefly for January 29, 2020 – The “Peanut Butter Subway Bandit, I Hate You” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A dog is rescued from the FDR, the best restaurants in the West Village, the city’s oldest espresso machine, why recycling doesn’t work in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 26˚ High: 41˚
Clear throughout the day.

An interview with New York’s first ever Director of Cannabis Programs, Norman Birenbaum. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

In 2020 government agencies are competing for your attention on Twitter, and you know what that means: memes. How do you do fellow kids? (Luke Winkie for NY Times)

The amazing rescue of Daiki, a Shiba Inu who got loose on the FDR. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Do the N95 respirator masks people are wearing around the city work against the Coronavirus? The CDC says they’re unnecessary and they’re backordered almost everywhere, but they are the respirators that are recommended for medical workers who are exposed to the virus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

There are many reasons to avoid taking the subways, but Health Commissioner Dr. Oxiris Barbot says there’s no reason to avoid them due to Coronavirus fears. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Nightmare: A reason to avoid the subways. Whoever smeared peanut butter all over a subway pole this morning on the A train, I hate you. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Seven reasons recycling isn’t working in New York City. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Captain America is from the Lower East Side, or maybe he’s from Brooklyn? It depends if you read the comics or watch the movies. The people behind the Captain America statue in Brooklyn believe Steve Rogers is “just a kid from Brooklyn.” (Anne Ewbank for Atlas Obscura)

New York City’s best hotels for design lovers. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Central Park belongs to the coyotes now. Keep your distance. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Photos: Celebrating the Lunar New Year in Sunset Park. (Paul Frangipane for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

15 restaurants to help get you through the winter. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

A new public schools initiative reduced absenteeism improved graduation rates by bringing social services to campuses across New York City, according to a new study from the Rand Corporation. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Tributes to artist Jason Polan have been posted since his death, highlighting Polan’s love of humanity, his founding of the Taco Bell Drawing Club, and warm heart. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A tribute to the street art of the East Village. (Dawson Knick for GVSHP)

Light-up seesaws were installed in Midtown three weeks ago. This week, The New York Times is on it. (Aaron Readle for NY Times)

Whoops. Chipotle was fined $1.3 million for 13,253 child-labor violations across dozens of locations in the state. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

The new City Winery location on Pier 57 is set to open later this year and the first show have been announced with Colin Hay, Sinead O’Connor, Vaness Carlton, Har Mar Superstar, and The Maintain Goats. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A search for the best pork bun in Flushing’s Chinatown. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

The city has chosen an NYC Ferry location for Staten Island, next door to the Staten Island Ferry that connects to lower Manhattan. The launch date for the ferry to connect to Midtown West should be announced by the summer. (NY1)

Amazon is expending its 855,000 square foot distribution center in West Shore, Staten Island, signing a lease on an adjacent 450,000 square foot warehouse. The new warehouse should be up and running by the summer. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

A searchable database of the thousands of Catholic clergy who have been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse across the country was published Tuesday and includes hundreds of members of the dioceses and religious orders in the New York City area. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

There are three types of driver’s licenses. Standard, READ ID, and enhanced. Things are going start getting confusing on October 1, when you can’t board a flight with a standard license. Here’s what you need to know about the difference between the three types and how to get a REAL ID or an enhanced license. (Lauren Paley for StreetEasy)

Op-ed: New Yorkers didn’t flinch when the NYPD was revealed to have a DNA database of juveniles or were performing dangerous body scans on pregnant women, but the controversy surrounding facial recognition company Clearview was enough for people to take notice. Albert Fox Cahn and Lindsay Greyerbiehl make the case why more NYPD oversight is necessary. (Albert Fox Cahn and Lindsay Greyerbiehl from Surveillance Technology Oversight Project for The Independent)

It took Mayor de Blasio five years to let his feelings be known about Daniel Pantleo, whose choke hold lead to the death of Eric Garner, but NYPD officer Michael Valva, who is accused of beating his autistic son and leaving him to freeze to death in his car, he’s already commented that “this is someone who should burn in hell.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The NYPD’s Joseph Stokes and Jose Aracena are accused of stealing cash during an “integrity test” held by the department. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Photos: Meet the dogs and cats of the American Kennel Club’s Meet the Breeds event. (Keilin Huang for Untapped New York)

Cafe Reggio has the city’s oldest espresso machine. It’s so old (how old is it?) that it originally ran on coal. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Department of Transportation announced the location of 10 miles of new protected bike lanes in Brooklyn, where 17 of last year’s 29 cyclists were killed by drivers last year. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

13 simple ways to make your apartment more green. (Lidia Ryan for 6sqft)

The 22 beset West Village restaurants to try. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for January 27, 2020 – The “Don’t Lean on the Subway Doors Today” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Brooklyn Flea revives the Chelsea Flea Market, Rafael Espinal quits City Council, $1,000 basement sleep pods, a library reording studio, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 45˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The real estate lobby is already calling for changes and exceptions to the city’s law reducing emissions 40% by 2030 and 80% by 2050. The law passed in May of 2019. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

New legislation could extend voting rights to Green Card holders and noncitizens with work authorization in municipal elections. There are 660,000 New Yorkers that hold Green Cards. 27 council members support the bill, but Corey Johnson hasn’t expressed support yet. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

The R179 subway trains that were removed from service last month are back and safe, according to the MTA. The blame fell on the doors not being properly calibrated, but maybe don’t lean on the subway doors anymore. (Alejandra O-Connel-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Under the elevated tracks in Queens remains a dangerous place to be, as a bolt fell from the N/W tracks in Astoria, shattering a car’s sunroof. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

It hasn’t fully set in, but the reality of Train Daddy’s resignation is starting to wash over the city. Corey Johnson called his resignation a “crisis.” (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

A list of Byford’s biggest achievements during his two years. (Jake Offenhartz and Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Byford isn’t the only person leaving the MTA. Pete Tomlin is also resigning. Tomlin isn’t nearly as well known, but he’s an expert in signals and was the signals chief. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Fairway in Red Hook has been there since 2006, but its future is in doubt. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

An ode to the metal rat, this year’s lunar mascot. (Madeline Leung Coleman for Jezebel)

Three people in New York state have tested positive for Corona virus, and according to the mayor it’ll come to the city “sooner or later.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know about the Coronavirus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A Hershey Bar has a new meaning, as Hershey’s has opened a bar in the Barclays Center that serves alcoholic drinks made with Hershey’s, Reese’s, and Jolly Rancher products. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Did you know there is a recording studio in the central branch fo the Brooklyn Pubic Library? (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Continuing from the Stonewall Democratic Club’s endorsement of Elizabeth Warren, Lambda Independent Democrats of Brooklyn endorsed Warren and Jim Owles Liberal Democratic Club endorsed Bernie Sanders. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The Chelsea Flea Market is making a return under new management. The Brooklyn Flea has a new lease for the parking lot location and will be inviting original vendors back for the same prices. As the Brooklyn Flea does, they have announced that they will also be inviting food vendors, but it will not be the focus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

There’s a movement brewing to revoke the permits for the Brooklyn Flea’s Smorgasburg event during July or August to give locals in Williamsburg unfettered use of East River State Park. There are no plans for that in 2020. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Queens has a new speakeasy, the new Astoria’s Secret is hidden behind the facade of The Lingere Shoppe. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The real question about Byford’s departure. Will your commute get worse? Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

After using the term “yellow folks” to refer to Asians in an email, Manhattan Community Education Council 3 is calling for Brooklyn Community Education Council member Dr. Jackie Cody to resign. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Flushing’s (wet) Lunar New Year parade. (Jenna Gyimesi for NY City Lens)

A fire in Chinatown likely destroyed 85,000 items, some dating to the 19th century, from Museum of Chinese in America. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

The Museum of Chinese in America is fundraising as they attempt to save what they can and rebuild. (Bowery Boogie)

An attempt at a definitive guide to New York’s Chinatowns. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

You think you pay to much in rent? Check out these $1,000 a month “sleeping pods” in a basement that are being proposed in San Francisco. (Katie Canales for Business Insider)

The NYPD is finally changing how it endorses the mayor’s electric bike ban. The focus will be on “unsafe” riding instead of ticketing and confiscating the bikes of food delivery workers, as their previous focused seemed to be. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

One thing missing from the coverage of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s moronic “go back to Ohio” comments was that the day prior to making them he was a guest at a banquet for the Real Estate Board of New York. It’s easier to make a villain of transplants instead of looking at the root problem of real estate developers who donate to your campaign for mayor and create the buildings that all these Ohioans and Iowans are moving living in. (Queens Crap)

20 standout Korean BBQ restaurants to try. (James Park for Eater)

Brooklyn Councilman Rafael Espinal quit City Council for a job with the Freelancer’s Union and the people working in his office found out about his new job via a tweet. There will be a special election for his seat in May, which represents Cypress Hills, Bushwick, Brownsville, Ocean Hill and East New York. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Spotted Pig’s staff was told to seek other work, and customers have been told that last weekend would be the restaurant’s last. It seems like the restaurant couldn’t wipe clean the stain of Ken Freidman or the things he allowed to happen inside its walls. (Eater)

You’re a reader of The Briefly, so this doesn’t apply to you, but for everyone else, where to take someone to eat who is cooler than you. (Bryan Kim and Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)