The Briefly for August 28, 2019 – The “Signs of a Wegmans Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

The growth in the car population is outpacing the growth of the actual population, the best floor in a walk-up, taking a wallaby for a walk, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All the street closings and timing of the West Indian Day Parade and all the associated events over Labor Day weekend. (Curbed)

An Andy Warhol tour and map of Manhattan from artist Patricia Fernández. (Untapped Cities)

Five takeaways from the plan to scrap the city’s gifted school programs. Will Mayor de Blasio follow the recommendation from the task force he assembled or will he try to run out the clock as he did with Eric Garner’s death? (NY Times)

It’s getting real. Signs are going up at the home of the future Brooklyn Wegmans. (Brownstoner)

Does it seem odd to anyone else that the mayor is supporting restrictions to hotel development after receiving support and campaign contributions from the hotel industry union? (6sqft)

The Mast Brothers are out of Brooklyn, doing the hipster move from Williamsburg to upstate. (Eater)

Every neighborhood has its old-school spots that have been there for decades, and many of them are endangered. Two Toms in Gowanus has been family owned since 1948, but the building the restaurant is in is for sale and the listing says it could be delivered vacant “if necessary.” (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The growth of the number of cars in the city is outpacing the growth of the city’s population. (Streetsblog)

The city is full of hidden history. Sometimes that history is a poster from 2000 for the movie Road Trip. (Gothamist)

In praise of the Manhattan dive bar: Cheap beer and good atmosphere are increasingly hard to find, but it’s out there. (amNY)

A worker was killed and five injured in a partial building collapse in Norwood in the Bronx. (Metro)

A wall in Chinatown with messages of support for the protests in Hong Kong has been vandalized twice in less than a week. Global politics are also local politics. (Gothamist)

What’s the best floor to live on in a six-floor walk-up? (Street Easy)

Jeffrey Epstein’s victims will never have their full day in court, but they have vowed to not stop fighting. (Gothamist)

The family of Eric Garner filed a judicial inquiry of Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill to answer questions about their handling of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of the NYPD. (Politico)

Leslie Jones is not returning to SNL. (Gothamist)

Video: Nothing to see here here, just a man walking taking his pet wallaby for a walk. Nope, this was in Bed-Stuy, not Bushwick. (Patch)

The total population in the city’s jails has fallen 23% from 2014, but the population jailed for parole violations increased by 20% in the same period, with the average stay lasting 60 days while they wait for parole court dates. (Gothamist)

Seven acres under the new Kosciuszko Bridge in Greenpoint will be made into a park. There’s no proposed opening date and construction has not begun. The project will be lead by the North Brooklyn Parks Alliance. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Conservative Times Op-Ed columnist and climate change denier Bret Stephens quit Twitter because someone called him a “bedbug.” Poor Bret. (Gothamist)

Video: It’ll take more than It’s Pennywise the clown to rattle New Yorkers riding the L late at night. (Patch)

28 of the best sports bars in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 27, 2019 – The “End the Gifted Programs to Desegregate the City’s Schools” Edition

This winter will be a tough one, a ghost kitchen haunts Soho, the 7 train destroys a morning commute, officials want answers about the BQE and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Why can’t New York be a modern city? The answer lies in the billion-dollar fiefdoms controlled by city and state agencies and can be illustrated by a simple dog walk. (New York Mag)

Another person was killed by a driver on Coney Island Avenue. A 40-year-old man was lying on the sidewalk near a parking garage when he was run over by someone pulling into the garage a little after midnight on Monday. This is the fourth person killed on or near Coney Island Avenue this year. (Streetsblog)

This week marks the 243rd anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn, the first battle of the Revolutionary War. Ten spots to mark the anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn. (Untapped Cities)

A panel of experts has a recommendation on how to end segregation in the city’s schools: close all the gifted programs. (NY Times)

If you’re someone who keeps a spreadsheet of the best food in Chinatown (I know more than one person who does this), strike Yee Li, formerly New Big Wang, from the list. After 33 years on the corner of Elizabeth and Bayard, the restaurant is closed but lives on in spirit at the family’s new restaurant, New Yee Li, on Fort Hamilton Parkway in Brooklyn.

Surprise! A broken rail on the 7 train ruined Monday morning’s commute on the 7, E, M, F and R trains. (Gothamist)

Photos and more photos from Afropunk (Gothamist and Brooklyn Vegan)

If you’re wondering what’s going on with the replacement of the BQE near the Brooklyn Promenade, you’re not alone. Multiple city and federal officials signed onto a letter looking for answers from the Department of Transportation. (Curbed)

A ghost kitchen is coming to Soho. Zuul, literally named after Zuul the Gatekeeper of Gozer from Ghostbusters, will house multiple restaurants who will only offer delivery. Sweetgreen, Junzi, Sarge’s, Naya, Stone Bridge Pizza & Salad, and POsitive Foods have already signed on. There is no restaurant, only Zuul. (Eater)

The Farmers’ Almanac has made their predictions for winter 2020 and you’re really gonna hate this. “With colder-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast and above-normal precipitation expected, our outlook forewarns of not only a good amount of snow, but also a wintry mix of rain and sleet—especially along the coast.” They are also predicting an extended winter and a slow start to spring. (Patch)

Today is PSL day in Starbucks across the country, but get ready for the Pumpkin Cream Cold Brew, the latest abomination destined for success. (Grub Street)

The Kosciuszko Bridge will open on Thursday, four years ahead of schedule, and bring with it pedestrian and bike lanes. (Curbed)

A state Supreme Court Judge upheld the state’s ban on religious exemptions to vaccinations for all children in public or private schools, put in place after the measles outbreak this year. The plaintiffs plan to appeal the decision. (Gothamist)

Arthur Schwartz, the lawyer leading the legal arguments against the 14th St busway who likened people protesting him to “white hooded zealots,” has compared Jane Jacobs’ fight in the ’60s against Robert Moses to his fight against “our millennial version of Robert Moses” Polly Trottenberg. Trottenberg, who graduated from Barnard College in 1986 and is not a millennial. (The Villager)

Statues for Equality by Gillie and Marc bring statues of ten women to Sixth Avenue on the anniversary of women getting the right to vote. (Untapped Cities)

Despite the president’s tweet that the federal government is working to extend the Q train to 125th St, nothing has been done by the Trump administration to prove his words remotely true. (6sqft)

Why do some buildings allow roof access and some do not? (Street Easy)

The overall number of overdose deaths in the city is down, but the Bronx, Staten Island, and Manhattan all saw increases. Rates are down among black and white New Yorkers but are up among Latinos. (amNY)

Taylor Swift’s “Cornelia Street” on her new album mentions the townhouse she rented in Greenwich Village. Take a look inside. (Curbed)

Would you believe that the NYPD Detective Darryl Schwartz, who is being sued for allegedly making bogus DWI arrests in order to earn extra overtime, has a history of misconduct? (Gothamist)

Anyerson Delacruz-Rosario was arrested in the Dominican Republic for his part in trafficking hundreds of thousands of packets of heroin and fentanyl to New York City. (Patch)

The lawsuit against the Central Park West bike lane appears to be in jeopardy as the building who filed the suit is facing internal challenges against it and possibly violated state law with the filing. (Streetsblog)

A tribute to the 99 cent pizza slice in the form of a new mural by City Kitty. (EV Grieve)

The best lunch spots in Midtown. (Thrillist)

Thanks to Baily Crawford (@blycrawford) for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 26, 2019 – The “A Green Wave is Declared” Weekend Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, Katz declares victory in the Queens DA recount (Cabán does not concede), a $1k meal, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway disruptions are pretty rough. Rider beware. (Subway Weekender)

Breaking down the city’s “Green Wave” plan: 30 miles of protected bike lanes per year, heavier enforcement on trucks, better intersection design, the bike lane crackdown becomes permanent, and “outreach” to motorists. (Streetsblog)

Part of the problem is the NYPD, which blames cyclists after drivers hit and kill them with their cars. Here’s a video of two NYPD officers incorrectly stating that cyclists should dismount their bikes and walk when crossing certain intersections. For clarification, there is never a situation where a cyclist has to dismount their bike in order to cross an intersection. (Gothamist)

The protests worked. Warren B. Kanders resigned as a vice-chairman of the Whitney after protests singled him out after his tear-gas grenades were used against migrants at the U.S./Mexico border. This follows the museums refusing gifts from the Sackler family, the family of billionaire monsters who were behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

A look at lower Manhattan’s privately owned public spaces and the politics that are slowly turning them from actual public spaces to food halls and retail. (Curbed)

The world’s smallest cinema? The Hoxton Hotel has made a big claim about a tiny movie theater they’ve located inside their elevator vestibule. (Untapped Cities)

Heard about the DoorDash scandal but haven’t gotten the details? Here’s what you need to know about it. Also, if you have a favorite restaurant to order from, consider ordering from them directly to better patronize them. (Grub Street)

Amtrak says they’re on pace with their infrastructure upgrades at Penn Station to be completed by Labor Day, which means fewer disruptions for the Long Island Rail Road. (amNY)

A Lime electric bicycle caught fire after exploding in Rockaway Beach this week. This wasn’t a malfunction, according to the company someone tried to break the bike’s lock and instead punctured the battery, which lead to the malfunction. Yikes. (Curbed)

The city started a Residential Loading Zone Evaluation pilot program, removing parking spaces from certain neighborhoods to give delivery vehicles and for-hire vehicles a place to temporarily stop instead of double parking or parking in bike lanes, which is a nuisance to other drivers but has proven deadly to cyclists. (Streetsblog)

The history of the city’s first drag landmark: the Pyramid Club. (GVSHP)

If you thought this summer is hot, wait until the end of the century, when almost a full month of the year will be over 105 degrees without global intervention against climate change. (Patch)

On election night, it was Tiffany Cabán that declared victory and Melinda Katz that refused to concede. As the results of the recount are imminent, it’s Melinda Katz has declared victory and Tiffany Cabán has refused to concede. (amNY)

No matter the outcome of the Queens DA recount, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s reputation has taken a hit as a result of the campaign juxtaposing her point-of-view against the much more progressive Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

The election results won’t be certified until Tuesday, but sources put Katz’s lead over Caban at 60 votes. Next stop: court. (Politico)

Got a love of Korean food and a thousand dollars you don’t want? Atomix’s ten-course tasting meal with wine pairings will take care of you with a cost of $928 after taxes but before tip. (Eater)

The social and cultural Puerto Rican history of the East Village in the wake of the governor of Puerto Rico resigning. (6sqft)

A needed change could be coming to the city’s elections, but it has to be approved as a ballot measure for November’s elections. A look at that and the other ballot initiatives coming our way. (Patch)

This is what Manhattan’s first public beach will look like. (6sqft)

The mayor and city council are pushing for two weeks of paid vacation for every employee, small businesses are pushing back. (Gotham Gazette)

A threat of gentrification can cause stress in a neighborhood. The story of a Sean Price mural and a kosher restaurant in Crown Heights illustrates that story and that stress perfectly. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 6th Annual Macaulay Culkin Show Summer Comedy Festival at The Bell House is bringing something to the festival that has never happened before. Macaulay Culkin. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The men who poured water on NYPD officers are facing a tougher punishment than the man whose chokehold lead to Eric Garner’s death. Why? (NY Times)

The place that gave the world rainbow bagels was seized by the state’s tax department for not paying almost a million dollars in taxes. (Eater)

Some of the city’s private schools are joining with yeshivas to fight the state’s demands that their students be taught basic English, math, and science. (Gothamist)

Who hasn’t had the dream of finding an expensive work of art in a thrift shop? A drawing in a Queens thrift shop turns out to be from Austrian Expressionist Egon Schiele and worth over $200,000. (Patch)

Eating weeds? Yup. Meet the former corporate lawyer supplying the city’s top restaurant with weeds to be used in dishes in the city’s top restaurants. (Viewing NYC)

Diving into the 40-year history of the Chinatown Ice Cream Factory. (amNY)

The most exciting restaurant pop-ups to check out, some of them end their run this weekend. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Lillia for the photo of Hellgate Farms!

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