The Briefly for March 3, 2020 – The “Kill it! Kill It All With Bleach!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Inside a Bushwick arts collective, Gale Brewer accidentally violates the Civil Rights Act of 1968, the tale of two of “the city’s best” burgers, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 58˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

A look inside Bohemian Grove, part venue, part apartment building full of artists and performers that are all paying under $1,000 rent and that is, yes, in Bushwick. (Kim Kelsey for NY Times)

Video: A POV experience going to the top of One World Observatory. (ActionKid)

An argument that restaurant letter grades, health inspections, and fines work against the public interest and instead are a great source of revenue for the city. (Demian Repucci for Grub Street)

Governor Cuomo directed NY health insurers to waive cost sharing associated with testing for coronavirus, including emergency room, urgent care and office visits. (@NYGovCuomo)

KILL IT WITH BLEACH. That the’s MTA’s plan to fight the spread of coronavirus on our buses, trains, and schools. New York will never be so clean again. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The numbers of New Yorkers infected with coronavirus will go up, but it does not mean that the virus is spreading. It means we’re identifying the people who have it already. In the meantime, cough and sneeze into your elbow, wash your hands with soap, and please stop touching your face. Are you doing it right now? Stop it. (Jesse McKinley and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

Top 5 pizza shops in the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Whoops. Gale Brewer’s stated argument against the rezoning for Lenox Terrace technically goes against the 1968 Civil Rights Act. Brewer specifically says the rezoning should be stopped to prevent a decrease in the area’s Black population. Attempts to preserve racial composition of a neighborhood goes against the act, even if it the original intention was to criminalize keeping white neighborhoods white. The argument made here lays it on a bit thick, but it highlights why our politicians need to be careful when laying out their arguments. (Nikolai Fedak for New York YIMBY)

Rendering: The Waldorf Astoria’s residents-only pool, 6,000 square feet with 19-foot ceilings and a retractible roof. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Democratic Socialists of America have allies in City Councilmember Costa Costantinides, State Senator Michael Gianaris, and Assemblymembers Ron Kim and Brian Barnwell in replacing Con Ed with publicly owned power. (Max Parrott for QNS)

Amtrak has a new chief executive in William J. Flynn, the third in the last three years. Good luck. ((Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

RIP Joe Coulombe, Trader Joe. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

A moderate Democrat drops out of the race in hopes that it ives another moderate enough of the vote to beat the Democratic Socialist at the top of the ticket. No, this isn’t about Mayor Pete or Amy dropping out of the race in hopes of stopping Bernie, this is Fernando Cabrera dropping out of the race for 14th Congressional District against Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez in hopes that Michelle Caruso-Cabrera has a better chance. (David Cruz for Norwood News)

Residents in East New York are looking to Albany to declare a cease-and-desist zone for house flippers after reporting multiple phone calls and door knocks a day from people attempting to buy their homes unsolicited. (Allison Dikanovic for The City)

A Q&A with the new Interim President of New York City Transit, where Feinberg offers no good answer as to why she supports hiring 500 additional cops with no measure of success on the job would look like for them and at the same time cutting 700 operational positions to save money. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Free rent and getting paid to explore downtown Manhattan. Welcome to the Explorer-in Chief job. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Without visible enforcement, the rules get relaxed. That’s what’s happening in Sunset Park as truck drivers are deviating from the city’s legal through streets and getting stuck in attempts to make impossible turns. The NYPD issued 16 tickets for commercial vehicles on residential streets in all of Brooklyn in January. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Could this be the year the city takes decisive action to protect pedestrians against drivers? State Sen. Andrew Gounardes is sponsoring a package of bills at the state level aimed at making the city’s streets safer. You’d think the City Council would be leading the way on this, but I’m glad to see that someone is attempting to take action. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A carriage horse was euthanized shortly after she collapsed in Central Park on Saturday. The incident that lead to the horse’s death was captured on video. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio as yet to make good on his campaign promise from 2013, where he said he would ban horse carriages from Central Park on day one. A promise which earned him the support of animal rights activists over Christine Quinn in the Democratic primary. (Elizabeth Titus for Politico)

The Sergeants Benevolent Association and Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, two loudmouth organizations when it comes to bail reform, are suspiciously quiet when it comes to the case of narcotics officer Stephen Abreu, who was charged with attempted murder, criminal possession of a weapon and other charges. Awaiting a felony murder charge, he was released without bail. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Kudos to Streetsblog, who heard about the stupid campaign in Staten Island to tie yellow ribbons around phone poles to warn drivers of speed cameras, and decided to go to Staten Island to tie as many ribbons around as many poles as they could find in protest. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Mayor de Blasio ran for president and his campaign died. He endorsed Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden is seeing a resurgence. Now he’s taking his kiss of death home to Chirlane McCray in hopes that he can help make his wife the next Brooklyn borough president. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

Scarr’s Pizza is moving, but only down the street to a larger location on Orchard St. Get your slices now so you can talk down to people waiting on line for pizza at the new location. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Sometimes you can’t pass up a sign (or two in this case) declaring the best burger in New York City. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

10 new public art installations not to miss in March. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Thank you to reader Dylan for sending in today’s featured photo from outside the Brooklyn Museum of this Leon Karssen sticker.

The Briefly for February 27, 2020 – The “Who is the Most Powerful Person in New York City?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Staten Island’s rebellion against speed cameras, the F train is headed for construction, the Gowanus Canal cleanup, eating in Mott Haven, and more

Today – Low: 29˚ High: 43˚
Light rain in the morning.

Central Park has a turtle problem. The red-eared slider turtle, technically listed as an invasive species, is having its run of Central Park and muscling out the park’s other species of turtles. How did they get there? They’re usually pets who are abandoned in the park because they’ve grown to an unmanageable size, or their humans weren’t ready for a potentially 50+ year commitment to their new shelled friend. (Sarah Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: See life in NYC from 1911 with this colorized and restored 4K footage. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The 100 most powerful people in New York City. The mayor is #4, which seems high. No, I did not make the list as the person who runs The Briefly, maybe in 2021. (City and State)

Pedro Colon, 61, faces criminal charges after his bus hit Patience Albert, 10, and a 15-year-old boy on the corner of Wortman Avenue and Crescent Street in Brooklyn. The 15-year-old survived, Patience Albert did not. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Get ready for over a year’s worth of construction on the F train to repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. The 14+ month job will also add cell service and wifi to the tunnel, so the next time you’re imprisoned by the MTA underneath the East River, you’ll also have to endure someone making a FaceTime call at the same time. Work is slated to start sometime later this year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s not time to freak out, but the coronavirus in the United States is “more of a question of exactly when this will happen” and not if, according to the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Here is how to prepare for coronavirus in NYC. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The mayor has been requesting the CDC allow New York City labs to test for coronavirus and that passengers arriving in NYC be screened for it. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

New York, as we know it, will no longer exist tomorrow. […] It’ll be the 1970’s all over again. People will get mean, the streets won’t be safe, graffiti everywhere, and movies will only cost three dollars.” -Tracey Jordan (30 Rock)

Here are NYC’s James Beard Awards semifinalists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

First Lady Chirlane McCray is considering running for Brooklyn Borough President. People of Brooklyn, I implore you to stop electing anyone in the de Blasio family into any public office in New York City. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A look back at the Depression-era shanty towns in New York City parks. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

The NYPD is investigating police union boss Ed Mullins, the head of the Sergeants Benevolent Association. Mullins, who will never be accused of making the rational move, has taken to Facebook to declare “I WILL NOT BE SILENCED BY THE THREAT OF DISCIPLINE, NOW OR EVER!” This is a man who was quoted as saying “Ferguson Missouri was a lie,” declared war on the mayor, NYPD officers should stand “shoulder-to-shoulder” with ICE and the list goes on. The investigation is to see if his views undermine his capacity as a sergeant, where he earns a salary of $133,524. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

State Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron upheld an August 2019 ruling that four towers planned for the Lower East Side Two Bridges development cannot move forward. The ruling says the land-review process was illegally bypassed and that 2,775 new apartments and 2.5 million square feet of new space does not qualify as “minor modifications.” (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The MTA announced 1,800 planned job cuts on Wednesday, but hasn’t said where they are coming from or if they are part of the 2,700 job cuts announced in the summer. The agency is hoping to close the projected billion dollar plus deficit projected by 2023. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Harvey Weinstein may never see the inside of Rikers Island to avoid “another Epstein incident.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A look back on when Mayor Bloomberg wanted poor people to drink less soda. (Arthur Delaney for HuffPost)

Maybe Mayor Bloomberg should never have uttered “we treated our teachers the right way” during this week’s Democratic debate, because NYC’s teachers have the receipts. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Amazon continues to rent buildings across the city, this time it’s a 300,000 square foot space in Middle Village, taking over the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s former space. (Bill Parry for amNewYork Metro)

The Trump administration can withhold millions of dollars in law enforcement grants from so-called sanctuary jurisdictions that refuse to cooperate with immigration authorities, according to a ruling issued on Wednesday from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan, a break from three previous court rulings. NYC received about $4 million a year in law enforcement grants. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

The City Council will consider a package of bills aimed at limiting how much food delivery apps like GrubHub and Seamless can charge restaurants. (Jeffery C. Mays and David Yaffe-Bellany for NY Times)

Staging a Broadway should is tough, staging a Broadway show in Madison Square Garden for 18,000 students is tougher. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Staten Islanders have been wrapping yellow ribbons around utility poles to indicate the presence of speed cameras. The argument of the Facebook group behind the effort is that the speed cameras are nothing more than a money grab from the city. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

Most elected officials in Staten Island won’t be participating in the island’s St. Patrick’s Day parade because the parade’s organizers will not allow Staten Island’s largest LGBT to march. Republican State Assemblymembers Nicole Malliotakis and Mike Reilly have announced they will be marching, perhaps making the political decision that Staten Islanders hate the LGBT community more than they hate bigotry in general. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

Here’s how the Gowanus Canal clean-up will proceed. (Pardon Me for Asking)

Where to eat in Mott Haven. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Camila for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 20, 2020 – The “A Diner by Any Other Name” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: “The Joy Goddess” of Harlem, the Lowline is dead, the best cocktail bars, Myles makes its NYC app debut, Lyft’s electric bikes are back and more

Today – Low: 22˚ High: 38˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

A look at A’Lelia Walker, daughter of Madam C.J. Walker, who 100 years ago in Harlem was given the nickname of “the Joy Goddess” by Langston Hughes, and whose parties and events provided a central location for the Harlem Renaissance. Part of a series by The Root focusing on little-known or forgotten rebels, celebrating Black History Month. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

Mayor Bloomberg started off his debate night getting ruined by Elizabeth Warren. The rest of the night didn’t go so great for him either. (John F. Harris for Politico)

A timeline of Michael Bloomberg’s support of stop and frisk. (Maggie Astor for NY Times)

The Lowline, once an extremely cool idea of putting a Highline style park in an abandoned trolley terminal in the Lower East Side, is dead. After more than a decade of work, the project is out of money. (Bowery Boogie)

Let’s grapple with an existential question for a moment: Is the Soho Diner really a diner? In Robert Sietsema’s review, he points towards no, with food choices pointing more towards “Top Chef” than “greasy spoon.” The desserts earned a compliment, but those are from Petee’s Pies and not made in house. Is a diner by name still a diner? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Myles is a new ride-hailing app available this week in NYC. The company claims rides will be 10% cheer than Lyft and Uber on average and they won’t make use of surge pricing. (Igor Bonifacic for Engadget)

Say hello to Eugene Hernandez, the new director of the New York Film Festival. (Sara Aridi for NY Times)

The MTA is betting $15 billion of its $51 billion 2020 – 2024 capital plan on the Trump Administration giving congestion pricing the go ahead and not delaying the 2021 rollout. If there is a delay or a call for an environmental impact study, congestion pricing won’t start on time and the MTA would likely have to borrow money, eventually leading to a transit financial disaster. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Lyft’s pedal-assisted electric bikes are finally back, after being pulled out of commission in April 2019 for malfunctioning brakes and batteries. (Tina Bellon for amNewYork Metro)

Chairnobyl? Chairnobyl. (EV Grieve)

NYC’s best under-the-radar museums, mapped. (Ameena Walker for Curbed)

This ain’t the piercing pagoda kiosk in the mall. A “hole new you” is ht promise of the new piercing studio Studs in Nolita. (Lindsay Tuchman for NY1)

The NYPD arrested a 14-year-old, the third and final suspect in the killing of 18-year-old Barnard College student Tessa Majors on Wednesday. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Take a look inside the ex-WeWork CEO’s three-story $27.5 million Gramercy Park apartment. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

John Ciero, a former NYPD officer, is among five people indicted in federal court for dealing meth and a date rape drug called GBL, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Southern District of New York announced on Wednesday. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New York City’s first weed dummies are arriving in Queens. Of course, you need to have a prescription to get them for the moment. (Jacob Kaye for QNS)

Here are the new protected bike lanes coming to Manhattan this year. From the plan, it looks like you’ll finally be able to bike around the perimeter of Manhattan completely in 2021. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

This story of a parrot who got loose in Manhattan, is frankly amazing. (Emily Flitter for NY Times)

Plush seating and carpets. That sounds like a good idea for the subways, right? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Citywide alternate side parking tickets will be increasing from $45 to $65 starting today. I used to live in Park Slope and my upstairs neighbor never moved his car for ASP because if he never moved his car and just paid the tickets once a week, he was still going to pay less than if he put his car in any garage in the neighborhood for the month. At $65, three tickets a month is still cheaper than any garage. (Kristen Torres for Sunnyside Post)

James Dolan has won more legal victories over former-Knicks star Charles Oakley than the actual Knicks have won championships over anyone. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The West Side Story revival has been met with protests, as demonstrators have been calling for Amar Ramasar’s removal from the cast because of his role in a photo-sharing scandal at City Ballet. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Chirlane McCray, Mayor de Blasio’s wife, launched a podcast called “Thrive with Chirlane McCray” on the Brooklyn Free Speech podcast network and we are all paying for it. The podcast is funded by Thrive NYC, which has received $850 million in taxpayer funds. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Do you know about “The Atlantic Ticket?” That’s a LIRR ticket that allows you to go from one of Brooklyn’s three stops to Jamaica, Hollis, Queens Village, Locust Manor, St. Albans, Laurelton or Rosedale for only $5. The success of this ticket is renewing calls that traveling within the city on the LIRR should cost $2.75. (Jose Martinez and Trone Dowd for The City)

Happy the elephant, who resides in the Bronx Zoo, does not have human-like rights and does not have to be transferred to a sanctuary. (NY1)

Believe it or not, there are people that live in the Financial District, and those people showed up in force to show their support against the creators of Sleep No More getting a liquor license at a Manhattan Community Board 1 licensing committee meeting. The new show is looking to set up shop in a mostly residential building. The NIMBYs voted against recommending a liquor license be granted and the proposal goes to a full vote of the community board next week, and the State Liquor Authority only uses community board votes as guidance, so it’s still possible the show moves forward as planned. (Ben Brachfield for Gothamist)

RIP Swamp Trump. We hardly knew ye. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYC’s top cocktail bars. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Eater)

thanks to reader Jacqueline for today’s featured photo!