The Briefly for December 4, 2019 – The “Another Reason Not to Eat Sushi From Walgreens” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio says a new stupid thing, the most popular dog names in the city, a french fry shortage is on the horizon, the Rock Center tree, and more.

The city won’t reveal its master plan for the Sunnyside Yards at a traditional town hall meeting, instead favoring a digital town hall, requiring participants to register in advance. Does the EDC expect a massive turnout and couldn’t find an appropriate space or are they trying to suppress opposition to their plan? (Michael Dorgan and Christian Murray for LIC Post)

If you’re the Governors Ball-going type, tickets are available for presale and they’re dropping hints about the lineup on Instagram. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

There’s a recall of ready-to-eat sushi, salads, and spring rolls from Trader Joe’s and Walgreens due to a contamination of Listeria. Trader Joe’s has reported no illnesses and if you have contaminated food you can bring it back for a refund. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Is Hurricane Dorian going to cause a french fry shortage? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A cargo delivery bike pilot program will be announced today with Amazon, DHL, and Whole Foods among its participants. The bikes look to be part truck and part bike, but will take up a much smaller footprint in regards to carbon and parking. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More info on the cargo bikes: They’ll be big, but also pedal assisted, allowed in commercial loading spaces, and will be concentrated from 60th to the Battery. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Hang for NY Times)

The process to make Rikers Island a public space kicked off this week to make way for the jail’s closing in 2026. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall is getting a $550 million remodel. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Has Mayor de Blasio’s control over the city’s schools been effective? The state Assembly will hold a hearing on the 16th. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s coming to Off-Broadway this December. (Matt Windman for amNewYork)

Vending machines like the CVS machines in Union Square and Chambers St station is both a new and nearly 120 year old idea. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A holiday tipping guide: How much to tip your doorman, super, porter, and more. (Brick Underground)

New York spends the most per student than any other state in the country and has the 13th lowest graduation rate. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Quickly: What’s the different between hemp and marijuana? The Brooklyn District Attorney’s office doesn’t know either. Earlier this year they boasted about stopping 106 pounds of marijuana from hitting the streets, but it was hemp, and they arrested Oren Levy from Green Angel CBD under the same assumption. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’ll be easier to prove tenant harassment from landlords thanks to new bills signed into law by Governor Cuomo. The laws expand the definition of harassment, remove the requirement that tenants prove they’ve been physically hurt by their landlords, and increases punishment for landlords who try to force out rent-regulated tenants. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Rockefeller enter Christmas tree. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

New Yorkers pride themselves on knowing the best alternatives. The best delis that aren’t Katz, the best pizza in DUMBO that isn’t from Grimaldi’s, the best food that isn’t outside your neighborhood, etc. Here are 20 Christmas trees that aren’t in Rockefeller Center. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A new public light installation at Brookfield Place called Light Up Luminaries creates a canopy of multi-colored, lit up cubes suspended from the ceiling with a “show” every hour. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Lord & Taylor is returning to the city for two weeks in December in the form of a 2,400 square foot pop-up shop in Soho, a far cry from their 676,000 square foot Fifth Avenue flagship location that was shuttered at the beginning of the year. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The NYPD has been shooting surveillance films of “individuals and enemies of the state” for decades and thanks to the Handschu agreement, over a hundred hours of digitized footage from the 1960s through the 1980s is available through the Department of Records & Information Services. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The laws passed on Tuesday are only the start of what advocates hope will be a fruitful 2020 session when it comes to rent reforms. Multiple bills addressing evictions, tenant protections and housing stability are still in-process in Albany. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork)

The mayor is venturing towards full-on idiot mode with every passing day. When asked if the NYPD should be allowed to publicly display Thin Blue Line flags on NYPD property, the mayor said “There’s a lot of Photoshop in this world, so we’ll see.” The Thin Blue Line flag has been adopted by neo-Nazis and white supremacists in response to the Black Lives Matter movement. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

40 inexpensive dining destinations. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New Yorkers speak 637 languages, and the Endangered Language Alliance has mapped them all. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Let’s start with the obvious, we did not arrest Wolverine.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

How much did your school’s PTA bring in last year? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

The most popular dog names in the city and Max and Bella. You’ve gotta step up your dog naming game. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden is offering free admission Tuesday to Friday, noon to 4:30pm. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

At least five Rikers Island correction officers have been suspended as investigators examine their failure to stop an 18-year-old detainee’s suicide attempt. (Ed Shanahan and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Where to go when you’ve eaten everywhere in Williamsburg. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 22, 2019 – The “Christmas Trees Are Already On The Streets” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA prepares for floods, the East River Greenway breaks ground, what it takes to wash the subway, and more in this weekend’s NYC news digest.

Check the disruptions before you go. No Q trains north of Kings Highway, no 3 trains at all, and changes to the 2, 5, C, D, E, F, and L lines this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

The strip club Sapphire has invited Kanye West to perform his Sunday Service in their venue for their entertainers, service staff, “and more.” They boast 10,000 square feet and 8,000 women on staff. Think he’ll take them up on it? (Brooklyn Vegan)

The Christmas tree stands have already arrived. (EV Grieve)

Did you see the photo of the Broadway Station subway stairs under water? The MTA was testing barriers to prevent subway stations from flooding on Thursday and it raised more than a few eyebrows. (Atlas Obscura)

The R179 subway cars are two years old, cost about $2 million each, and are less reliable than the R62s, which have been running since 1984. The new ones break down almost twice as much as the R62s. (The City)

$50 strawberries? Is the high end price of anything surprising anymore? (Eater)

A history of ice staking in the city. (6sqft)

Say hello to Detective Abdiel Anderson, the NYPD’s most sued cop. He’s been sured three times in the last six months for civil rights violations, which contributes to his over 40 lawsuits in his 16 years, costing the city over half a million dollars. The NYPD hasn’t stated if he’ll ever face discipline. (Gothamist)

The Met is in danger of losing its “A” credit rating. (NY Times)

NY Democrats prefer Joe Biden for president with 35% support. Second place was Elizabeth Warren with 14%, followed by Bernie Sanders with 13%. (Patch)

Here’s a first look at Sunset Park’s new Made in NY Campus. (Curbed)

A look at Teens Take Charge, a coalition of high school students pushing to have a say in how their public schools are run, and how the system could be more equitable. Monday morning will start a string of protests to call attention to the challenges of school choice. (Gothamist)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Light ceremony will be on December 4 at 8pm. The tree will be lit through January 7, so you’ve got plenty of time to see it decked out in its 50,000 LEDs. (Time Out)

If you want to make a week out of it, Tavern of the Green’s tree lighting is taking place on December 3rd at 5pm. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Photos and videos form the New York Botanical Garden’s Holiday Train Show. It opens on Saturday and runs through January 26th. (Gothamist)

The Bronx Night Market is the best outdoor food fair, according to the Times. (NY Times)

The city will break ground on the $100 million East River Greenway Link from 53rd to 61st streets. It’s expected to be completed in 2022. (amNewYork)

A sink hole nearly ate a construction vehicle in Park Slope on Thursday morning. A 9-by-7 foot hole opened on 15th St near 4th Ave. (amNewYork)

The most picturesque sites in the Village. (GVSHP)

10 of the best brunch spots in New York City. (amNewYork)

The governor vetoed a bill that would have created a “Bird-Friendly Building Council” to make buildings less likely for birds to fly into them. The New York City Audubon estimates up to 230,000 birds crash into buildings a year. (Curbed)

The mayor announced a new position in the city government to guide, oversee and report on decision-making algorithms going forward, but it creates an exemption protecting the NYPD from oversight. (Gothamist)

The city will close two jails next year, The Brooklyn Detention Complex on Atlantic Ave and one of the Rikers Island complexes, totaling 2,100 beds. The staff won’t be laid off and moved to other facilities. (Patch)

Video: The MTA’s mobile wash team is the Sisyphus of the subways. (viewing NYC)

From 2018 to 2019, 8% more of the city’s high schoolers enrolled in college. (amNewYork)

Everything we know about Market Line, the Lower East Side’s food destination at Essex Crossing that is opening today. (Eater)

Six of the best things to do in the city off-the-beaten path. (amNewYork)

Will there ever be enough odd museums in the city? “No,” says the Makeup Museum, opening in May 2020. (The Villager)

The City Council will ban flavored vapes. 30 members of the 51-member council signed on as co-sponsors of the legislation. (NY Times)

Queens DA-elect Melinda Katz is at odds with current DA Jack Ryan (that’s his real name) when it comes to ending cash bail, which is, and I believe this is a legal term, “tough shit” for Ryan. The state’s legislature passed a law that will end cash bail for misdemeanors and non-violent felonies starting in 2020. (Politico)

A deep dive into how NYC voted in 2019. (Gotham Gazette)

Robert Sietsema’s top five egg dishes around the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for January 2, 2019 – The “Which Subway Stations Party the Hardest?” Edition

McNally Jackson isn’t moving, the Continental is close (or is it), the PATH trains lose $400 million/year, the city’s first homicide of 2019, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It took 4 hours and thirty minutes, but NYC’s first homicide of 2019 happened in East New York in Brooklyn. (NY Post)

Throw that Christmas tree into a wood chipper! You can leave it on the curb too, but that’s not nearly as much fun. (Gothamist)

Stop throwing your unused prescription medication in the toilet. The Drug Take Back Act requires chain and mail-order pharmacies to provide safe ways to dispose of your medication. (Waste Advantage Mag)

2nd Ave and Bedford Ave party hardest of any subway stations in the city. (Camden Willeford)

When it comes to offering new and modern methods of transportation, the west coast is kicking our ass. (NY Times)

Will Kirsten Gillibrand, Michael Bloomberg, or Governor Cuomo run for president and 33 more questions for New York politics in 2019. (Gotham Gazette)

At his inauguration on Ellis Island, Governor Cuomo placed New York in opposition to President Trump and his policies. (NY Times)

Watch Governor Cuomo’s entire 2019 inauguration address. (Global News)

Congratulations to The Court Square Blog for five years and over 2,000 stories of coverage. (The Court Square Blog)

The East Village dive Continental closed for good on New Year’s Eve, but a sign in the window promises (or threatens, depending) a return in the neighborhood soon. (EV Grieve)

PATH trains lose $400 million a year and there is no possible hope to close that gap. (NY Times)

McNally Jackson Books will not be moving, despite making a big stink about rising rents three months ago. (Bowery Boogie)

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