The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “Poison Ivy is Growing All Over the City” Edition

Photos and highlights from the USWNT’s ticker-tape parade, Citi Bike is failing NYers of color and the poor, WORD’s summer reading list, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Here’s an overview of where the Queens DA race is at the moment. (amNY)

The governor has a bill on his desk that can end the Cabán/Katz election lawsuit. Why hasn’t he signed it? (NY Times)

The state passed rent reform, but that’s no reason to let your guard down. Here are four new ways that landlords will try to raise your rent. (Gothamist)

The city started to make good on a promise made 15 years ago to bring a park to Downtown Brooklyn. The first portion of Willoughby Square Park is open to the public on the corner of Gold and Duffield. (Curbed)

Can you identify poison ivy? No? Here’s a primer, since apparently, it grows all over the city. (Gothamist)

The oldest 13 restaurants in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Adda, Atomix, and Kopitiam are now on Eater’s best new restaurants in America list. (Eater)

Photos from the World Cup USWNT Parade. (amNY)

Team captain Megan Rapinoe’s speech was full of hope and ended with a truism: “New York City, you’re the motherfucking best!” (Huff Post)

The glorious signs at the parade. (Huff Post)

If you’ve still got soccer fever, here’s a list of new or soon-to-be-built soccer fields across the city. (Localize Labs)

A history of ticker-tape parades. (6sqft)

RIP Michael Seidenberg, owner of Brazenhead Books, an Upper West Side speakeasy bookstore that held late-night salons. (Untapped Cities)

Congrats are in store to the first Trailblazers Awards from the Brooklyn Cannabiz Collective, honoring people of color who are pioneers in the cannabis industry. (Brooklyn Paper)

What’s on your summer reading list? Here’s an offering from WORD Bookstore. (Brooklyn Based)

The city announced a decrease in the size of the community jails planned as a replacement for Rikers Island. (amNY)

Activists disrupted the meetings to shout down Deputy Director of the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice Dana Kaplan’s testimony. (Patch)

MAMACHA café was known for it’s CBD infused drinks, snacks, and soft-serve ice cream. Unsurprisingly, it closed the same day the city’s CBD-food and drink ban was put into place. (Bedford + Bowery)

A new contract agreement between pre-K teachers and the city will bring them one step closer to pay parity with the rest of the city’s teachers, bumping up the salaries of some Community Based Organization (CBO) teachers by $20,000. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Dave Chappelle is Dave Chappelle, even when he’s on Broadway. Of course, he’s gonna stir up some controversy. (BrooklynVegan)

A new report shows that Citi Bike is failing to include New Yorkers of color and the poor. The median household income of people who lives close to a Citi Bike dock is $90,400, while the median household income of someone is $54,700. The report calls for Citi Bike to expand into 11 specific neighborhoods with “high social vulnerability.” (Curbed)

Camp Junior, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is open this summer after a two-year renovation. The camp is open for 9-to-13-year-olds from neighborhoods in the Bronx with a risk of gang activity. (Patch)

Dean & Deluca owes small businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars for providing the chain with cookies, bread, pastries, and etc and will be closing stores in an attempt to stay in business. (NY Times)

This year’s Summer Streets dates have been announced. Get ready to take over Park Ave on three Sundays in August. (Viewing NYC)

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s artist-in-residence program has selected this year’s artists. E, Jane, Elliot Reed, and Naudline Pierre. The group show from the previous cohort is up at MoMA PS1, which will also host next year’s edition. (NY Times)

How to spend a day in the Rockaways. (NY Times)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for May 13, 2019 – The “The Thing Is, I’m Not Sorry” Edition

The mayor announces the city will work more closely with ICE, CitiBike’s electric bikes aren’t coming back until the fall, these kittens need adopting, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes hit the 4, 6, 7, A, E, N, and Q trains. (Subway Changes)

It’s been seven years since Hurricane Sandy and the city has only spent 54% of the $14.7 billion in the federal aid set aside for recovery. City Comptroller Scott Stringer blames federal bureaucracy but also puts blame on City Hall’s lack of urgency to protect itself against the next storm. (Curbed)

The Times is getting in on the de Blasio anti-endorsement train. (NY Times)

10 quiet places to escape the city’s noises. (Untapped Cities)

A look back to Bertha Heyman, a swindler of men in New York from the 1880s. Even from prison, she swindled a man out of his life’s savings. (Atlas Obscura)

Anna Sorokin, from prison, said she’d be “lying to you and to everyone else and to myself if I said I was sorry for anything.” Maybe the next step is conning someone out of their life’s savings. (NY Times)

A walk through Brooklyn’s Dekalb Market is an exercise in bathing yourself in the chaotic glow of multiple colors and shapes of neon lights which has a distinct “city” feel. The Times looks back with photos at when neon lights shone with hope and glamour and gave New York and Times Square a visual identity. (NY Times)

Are you ready for a summer of floating LED billboards at city beaches? (Gothamist)

Some of us love birds but don’t have the patience for bird watching. Maybe that’s part of the Central Park Mandarin Duck’s appeal. If you can’t be bothered with finding the hot duck, there’s Nicolas Holiber’s Birds on Broadway, the Audubon Sculpture Project, which is bringing ten sculptures of native NY birds in danger of going extinct to the medians of Broadway. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA’s 7 Train work is completed, with the trains programmed for optimal cruising speed and increases the number of trains per hour during peak service from 25-27 to 29. (Sunnyside Post)

The first electric unicycle explosion happened near Union Square, which started a two-alarm fire. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including a triple-digit violation, which really takes effort. (Patch)

22 bars where you can actually find a seat. (The Infatuation)

This year’s NYC Century Bike Tour will be the last. Transportation Alternatives’ strategy has changed over the last 30 years and so has riding a bicycle in the city. With about 10% of all New Yorkers riding a bike several times a month, biking no longer needs to be established as a legitimate form of transportation. (Streetsblog)

“The vast, vast majority of undocumented people in this city know their city government is protecting them, respecting them, supporting them.” Mayor de Blasio announced the city will be working even more closely cooperate with ICE. (Patch)

A guide to all of the reasons that the mayor is running for president, like being habitually late, he gets driven to the gym on a daily basis to avoid taking the train, and… no one can make this guy look like a viable candidate. (Gothamist)

16 of the coolest hotel pools in the city, including some open to the public. (Curbed)

Imagine the terror of one million New Yorkers moving on the same day. That day used to be May 1 when almost all of the city’s leases were up. Imagine the equivalent of a million New Yorkers all moving on the same day. (CityMetric)

Where to go drinking with your dog on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

One of the most prolific members of the online white supremacist community was ID’d as 30-year-old Flushing resident Joseph Jordan, according to an investigation from the watchdog group Southern Poverty Law Center. (Gothamist)

The governor is calling for investigations into possible widespread fraud at the MTA over the misreporting of overtime. If you’re looking for a blow-by-blow of politicians, transit officials, and labor representatives pointing fingers and shift blame, there was an “emergency” MTA board meeting where labor representatives and Governor Cuomo’s MTA appointees pointed fingers, shifted blame, and of course, got nothing accomplished. (amNY & Second Ave Sagas)

It’s the start of kitten season in the city, which means the ASPCA is expecting 1,500 kittens from May to October. They are looking for people willing to foster kittens and offers training, food, supplies, and support. Plus “I’m fostering kittens right now” will look very good on your Tinder profile. (Gothamist)

Video: Peter Wallker dissects preconceived notions about the dangers of “cyclists.” (The Guardian)

Something must be seriously screwed up with CitiBike’s pedal-assisted bikes. They were pulled from the streets in April for a problem with the brakes and they won’t be seen again until the fall. (Streetsblog)

Meet the NYCHA plumber that earned over $200,000 in overtime last year. (The City)

The city’s top 14 burgers, from The Daily Meal’s list of the best 101 in the nation. (Patch)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 15, 2019 – The “Last Week of the $2.75 Subway Fare” Edition

The next level of stop-and-frisk, Citi Bike pulls its electric fleet, an alcohol-free bar, a $42 steak for your dog, a body in the Botanical Garden, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weather this week will bring an “unsettled pattern” to us, which is code for “the weather’s gonna suck.” (amNY)

How to tip. Regardless of how you feel about the practice of tipping or how service workers are paid, we still tip. (Grub Street)

If you love your dog, no really love your dog, the Wilson has a dog’s only menu that includes a $42 ribeye steak. (Eater)

MTA fare is going up on April 21, so you have until Subway to fill up your MetroCards with bonuses. (NY Times)

The L project starts on April 27, but don’t let the MTA fool you. Starting tonight for the next two weeks there will be no service between Brooklyn and Manhattan from 10:30pm through 5am. (6sqft)

A Chipotle, a Pizza Hut, and all the other restaurants ordered closed last week by the Health Department. (Patch)

Out with the gross and in with the new. Say hello to the city’s new restaurants. (amNY)

Six bedrooms, nine bathrooms, a garden level, a pool and two saunas and it can be yours for a $195,000/month lease. (Patch)

New York is not the most expensive place on earth to build. It’s the second most expensive. (The Real Deal)

From the man who claimed that homosexual community controls the city, here comes a Congressional run. (Patch)

The NYCHA can’t seem to get repairs one on time, but they sure didn’t wait a second longer than they had to when evicting a 72-year-old man recovering from amputation surgery in the Bronx over $812. (amNY)

Deep breath in. Hold it. An alcohol-free bar has opened in Greenpoint. And exhale slowly. (Greenpointers)

Forget MoviePass, here comes the Alamo Season Pass. (Gothamist)

Punk Island released its first batch of bands for the free festival on June 22. (BrooklynVegan)

The MTA has until June 30 to put its fare evasion strategy to paper, thanks to legislation in the state’s budget in an attempt to get the NYPD, the boroughs’ DA offices, and the MTA on the same page. (Patch)

Employees at the American Museum Natural History are threatening resignations and boycotts over the museum’s refusal to cancel a gala celebrating confirmed monster and Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro. (Gothamist)

Giving students a say in how their school’s budgets are allocated? What a novel idea. (Gothamist)

Riding a bus in the city is bad enough before you start throwing cups of pee in anyone’s face. (CBS Local)

Did you say Bryant Park beads? No. BEES. (Bryant Park BeeCam)

The MTA’s weekend reputation isn’t going to get any better with stories like this. The MTA shut down subways to Roosevelt Island after the stations were overwhelmed by people trying to get to the Cherry Blossom Festival. (Gothamist)

Remember those 1,000 new electric bikes that Citi Bike was going to add to their fleet? They’ve been pulled due to some questions about their brakes. (Streetsblog)

A body was found in the Bronx River inside of the New York Botanical Garden on Saturday. There were no signs of trauma and the medical examiner’s office is investigating. (amNY)

Listen, birds are cool now, so look to the skies. (Patch)

After the New York Post put an image of September 11 on its cover to make a questionable and tasteless point, multiple groups are calling for a boycott. That will include The Briefly. No more links to the Post for a while. (NY Times)

A look inside Amazon’s Staten Island fulfillment center, robots and all. (amNY)

Chameleon, the Financial District’s local comic shop on Maiden Lane, closed after 30 years. An increase would have put his rent over $10,000 for five hundred square feet, just East of Broadway. (NY Times)

It’ll be the newer New Museum. The New Museum is looking to expand into a new seven-story structure next to where the museum currently stands on Bowery. (Bowery Boogie)

17 places to get an affordable brunch. What does “affordable” mean? That depends. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.