The Briefly for October 24, 2019 – The “De Blasio Goes to War With the Lower East Side” Edition

The city is retiming traffic lights for cyclists, the special ingredients in the city’s water, it’s worth freaking out about Wegmans, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Want to live somewhere affordable, but still be in the city? Check out these 15 Queens streets, which are some of the most affordable in the city. (QNS.com)

The Union Square tech hub has a new name. Is Zero Irving any better of a name? (Curbed)

With the highest body count of cyclists killed by drivers in the city in twenty years, the city has begun to reconfigure the timing of traffic lights to better cater to cyclists to make the streets safer. (NY Times)

The mayor’s latest war is against the Lower East Side, with a new “quality of life” campaign for a six-block area that encompasses more than 80 bars and restaurants. They’re using a name that rolls right off the tongue: The Late-Night Quality of Life Improvement Plan. (Curbed)

10 hidden gems in Crown Heights. (Untapped New York)

A chill in the air means it’s the first hints of cuffing season. Here are 10 date ideas you can do on a Citi Bike. (Bushwick Daily)

The ice skating rinks in Central Park have dropped their Trump branding, but make no mistakes, they’ll still be operated by the Trump Organization. Turns out having Trump’s name on things doesn’t help business in New York City. (Curbed)

I don’t think that a Wegmans opening in Brooklyn is a big deal, but my wife who grew up upstate insists that I am very wrong and it’s worth freaking out about Wegmans. (Eater)

The troubled Squibb Bridge that connected Brooklyn Heights to Brooklyn Bridge Park has been demolished after opening in 2013, closing in 2014 and not opening again until 2017 and then closed again in 2018. (Curbed)

A guide on where to eat, drink, shop, and more in Industry City. (StreetEasy)

To combat the high number of NYPD suicides this year, the department is offering free, confidential mental health care as part of the “Finest Care” program. (Patch)

What’s in the city’s water that makes it taste so great? It might be the 270 cancer, brain damage, and pregnancy complicating chemicals found in a recent study by the Environmental World Group. (Patch)

Where to go when you’ve got a blind date. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 8, 2019 – The “Boomer Boogeyman is to Blame” Edition

The NYPD runs a cyclist oft the road, Melinda Katz’ lead narrows to 16 votes, a look back on Seinfeld’s pilot, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway disruptions seem minimal. (Subway Weekender)

“Admittedly it was against the law, but we had police consent.” This is the story of a band of vigilantes who destroyed a grove of trees in Forest Hills as the police watched in an attempt to harass the gay community a few days before the Stonewall Riots. (NY Times)

This Wednesday your good friends at The Briefly and the skint bring you ‘When Harry Met Sally’-themed Trivia at Parklife. (Brooklyn Based)

The “boomer backlash,” self-identified progressives born between 1946 and 1964, is hampering city progress across the country using tactics normally associated with the alt-right to shout down and shut out changes to their neighborhoods. These voices don’t represent the will of the majority, but they’re the loudest and most mobilized in the room with the most people in their Facebook groups. This is how so many people in Park Slope seem opposed to housing for the homeless, 14th Street doesn’t prioritize buses while the L train has minimal service or why so many needless deaths occur on the city’s streets because some residents prioritize the city providing public parking for private vehicles instead of the safety of cyclists. This, from the generation that gave us the 2008 housing bubble, the war in Iraq, and who handed out participation trophies. (Huff Post)

Pity your Jersey friends, for many reasons. Especially who must take N.J. Transit. Last week alone, more than 60 trains were canceled. (NY Times)

15 awesome Astoria happy hours. (We Heart Astoria)

A good news story for your Monday. Three officers sent to arrest a woman who was allegedly stealing groceries at the Union Square Whole Foods paid for the items instead. (Patch)

Victor Ang succumbed to injuries sustained after he was hit by a car while biking in April and has become the city’s 15th biker who was hit by a car and killed in 2019. (Gothamist)

The NYPD intentionally rammed a cyclist on a Citi Bike who ran two red lights. The NYPD’s crackdown on drivers creating unsafe situations for cyclists has yet to begin. (Streetsblog)

How to find a rent-stabilized apartment. (Curbed)

How was your weekend? Oh, you know, I watched a video of a man carrying a live rat in his mouth while riding the subway. (Patch)

Turns out the best place to watch the July 4th fireworks was illegally riding between subway cars on the Manhattan Bridge. (Gothamist)

Congrats to you, Brooklyn! There were no reported firework-related injuries during July 4, despite me watching a group of bewildered men accidentally shoot off a dozen of rockets at a line of parked cars and garbage piles. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The ubiquity of camera phones can make you take a candid photo of a street vendor for granted but a look through the photos taken by a tourist in NYC in 1970 can shift your entire perspective, especially a photo from the Empire State Building looking South which is without Battery Park City or the World Trade Center. (Ephemeral New York)

A cross-sectional look at some of the city’s landmarks. (Viewing NYC)

The spread of measles has been slowing, calling back to the city’s history of containing contagious diseases, even if it wasn’t always pleasant. (6sqft)

An exhaustive look back at the one episode of Seinfeld you probably haven’t watched a thousand times: the pilot. (Gothamist)

12 sites that explore the immigrant experience in NYC. (Curbed)

Here they are, the Dominique Ansel city-themed pastries that look like toy versions of other food. If you’re dying for a pavlova shaped like an everything bagel, this is your opportunity. (Gothamist)

There weren’t too many restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health (either it was the short holiday week or the city’s eateries are getting cleaner), but we still have a new entry into the triple-digit point club. (Patch)

The city declared a climate emergency. What’s next? (NY Times)

Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s lead in the Democratic primary is down to 16 votes. This week the manual recount begins. (Politico)

An unidentified male body was found dead inside a food truck on Liberty Ave in Jamaica. (QNS)

Andrej Tadeusz Kosciuszko, for whom the city bridge and pool are named after, is getting a memorial in his hometown in Belarus. Kosciuszko traveled to the United States from Poland after hearing of the Revolutionary War and by the end of the war became a brigadier general. (NY Times)

U.S. Women’s National Team is getting a ticker tape parade on Wednesday morning from Battery Park to City Hall, only the fifth since the year 2000. (amNY)

10 great rooftop bars. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for April 16, 2019 – The “Birds Are Cool and Trash Pandas are Getting Vaccinated” Edition

The city’s fight again measles continues with a preschool shutdown, a pipeline threatens Rockaway Beach, New York pizza in the Virgin Islands, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

CompStat, the focus of a recent ReplyAll episode, is being blamed in a $70 million lawsuit by a Brooklyn family against the NYPD for harassment and a false arrest. (Daily News)

The MTA can tout percentages of trains that have had improving performance, but the truth of the matter is that Monday morning’s commute was a nightmare for the A, C, E, F, M, J, and G trains. (Gothamist)

Now that birds are as cool as a street corner shaved ice, here are sixteen of the best bird-watching spots in the city. (Curbed)

Webster Hall is reopening this month and the first show was announced: Jay-Z. (BrooklynVegan)

This makes no small claim, but Eater has a profile of the women who make New York’s “most perfect tortillas.” (Eater)

107 years (and a day) after the Titanic sunk and 21 years after Kate Winslet let Leonardo DiCaprio die, here are ten city sites that connect New York to the sunken ship. (6sqft)

Ten places to visit in the city for a “small town” feel. (Untapped Cities)

President Trump’s executive order expediting gas pipelines is hitting close to home, with the Williams Northeast Supply Enhancement, which is proposed to run from Pennsylvania and terminate close to Rockaway Beach. Opponents say the project will threaten the harbor and marine life in the area. (QNS)

New York may have been able to fight off Amazon, but Jeff Bezos is still eyeing property. Rumor is he’s looking to spend $60 million on a new apartment, which would be a few blocks from other apartments he owns. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The death of Nipsey Hussle inspired a march for peace over with hundreds of current and former gang members in the South Bronx. (Gothamist)

The second-tallest building in the Western Hemisphere is moving forward. The building will require special permits, but if it’s allowed it will be 1,556 feet tall and the 18th “supertall” tower to be constructed in the last dozen years. (6qsft)

What is the cost of a measles outbreak? A single outbreak can cost an individual nearly $10,000 and more than $5 million for a community. (The Indicator from Planet Money)

The city shut down a preschool program at a Brooklyn yeshiva for violating the Health Department order that requires them to have a corrective action plan for measles. (NY Times)

A lawsuit claims that the measles outbreak in the city isn’t an emergency and demanding a restraining order on the mayor’s mandatory vaccination rule that went into effect last Tuesday. There have been 285 confirmed measles cases in Williamsburg since October. (Gothamist)

If your day has been stressful, take a moment to watch Maxine the Fluffy Corgi fight to stay awake while riding the subway. (Viewing NYC)

While new explicitly New York, it is New York pizza related. The best restaurant in the U.S. Virgin Islands is a New York pizza food truck boat in Christmas Cove. (Atlas Obscura)

All seven BQE rehab plans, explained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

City Winery, which will lose its current location when Disney’s offices eat the West Village, will have a new home in early 2020 at Hudson River Park’s Pier 57. (Eater)

Brooklyn Bride Park’s spring and summer lineup was announced, including a kite festival, the MET Opera, stargazing, a more. (Bklyner)

The Met Museum’s new rooftop installation “Parapivot” touches on the interstellar, Manhattan’s grid, and is meant to invoke a connection to “the multiverse above and around us, too.” (amNY)

No one wants to pay full price, and that includes State Senator Andrew Gounardes. Gounardes is arguing that Brooklyn residents who frequent the Verrazzano bridge should receive a discount. The discount for Staten Island residents was put in place because it seemed unfair to charge full price for every single way to get in or out of the borough. There are many roads in and out of Brooklyn. (Bklyner)

Here’s a stunning time-lapse of the Manhattan skies after a snowstorm. (Scott Segler)

The NYCHA’s inspection of 135,000 apartments for lead hazards begun this week. At the current rate, the inspections are scheduled to end before 2020. The mayor has not appointed a new NYCHA chair since the deadline passed on April 1. (amNY)

Portions of the city’s trash panda population will be vaccinated for rabies. No lawsuits are expected as a result of the vaccine implementation. (Gothamist)

The American Museum of Natural History canceled the gala that would have honored Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s asshole president. Sorry Brazil, we can only deal with one asshole president at a time. (Gothamist)

Lyft plans on integrating Citi Bikes into the main Lyft app starting in May, which will allow you to pay for your bike and ride in one app. It’s also a good way to educate New Yorkers that Lyft owns Motivate, Citi Bike’s parent company. (Patch)

It was the parents and not City Hall that successfully desegregated schools in District 3 and 15 when the city seemed to be incapable of doing so while the rest of the city’s education system remains one of the most segregated in the nation. (NY Times)

After three deaths on construction sites this week the City Council is pushing for the implementation of a construction safety training law passed in 2017. (Queens Crap)

The best Omakase sushi in the city, ranked by price. (Thrillist)

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