The Briefly for July 16, 2020 – The “She Doesn’t Even Go Here” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor signed the chokehold ban, congestion pricing is dead, the Times asks if the NYPD has given up on investigating shootings, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 77˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

In 2019, the state budget anticipated a January 2021 start for congestion pricing in the city, which would have helped to the tune of $15 billion over five years to help the MTA. What’s the status? Without federal approval, the project is dead. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A look at the six finalists in the Brooklyn Bridge redesign competition, organized by the city and the Van Alen Institute. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A prayer match from Brooklyn to City Hall, led by Black clergy leaders and sold as a community-focused Christian unity event, turned ugly when it was co-opted by the NYPD and Blue Lives Matter protesters. An NYPD union promoted the event as one of their own, perhaps to make it appear like they have community support. An avoidable situation without the NYPD’s meddling. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

NY Times, welcome to the resistance. Today the Times questions if the piles of unsolved shootings across the city, is the NYPD pulling back from its job? The NYPD’s Dermot Shea has a ton of excuses, but ultimately the NYPD made arrests in only 23% of the 634 shootings this year through July 12. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

The NYPD confirmed the dismembered body found in a LES apartment was tech CEO Fahim Saleh. Saleh was the CEO of Gokada, a motorbike-hailing app in Nigeria. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A body was found wrapped in plastic underneath a UHaul blanket on the roof of a McDonald’s in The Bronx on Wednesday morning. The cause of death has yet to be determined. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A deeper look at the federal government’s roadblocks on NYC’s congestion pricing. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

West Indian American Day Carnival is going digital for 2020. (Yannise Jean for The Brooklyn Reader)

When baseball officially returns, gets ready for a very odd extra-inning rule that puts a runner on second base automatically. Listen guys, if you don’t want to play past nine innings, just say so. You don’t have to make up new rules. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The High Line opens to the public today, but with a reservation system and from noon to 8 pm. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Apartment Porn: A $9.4 multi-story Upper East Side penthouse with four terraces, a 24-hour doorman, a built-in library and whatever a “supplemental laundry room” is. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will reopen five days a week starting on August 29. (Peter Libbey for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has a new website to promote and sell PPE manufactured at the Navy Yard. They’ll also be selling them in PPE vending machines at West Elms and Wegmans. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Seems that most people are still paying rent. According to the National Multifamily Housing Council, 88% of tenants are paying rent, down only a percent or two from the same time last year. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

“The only reason you’re out here is because you feel guilty.” City Councilmember Stephen Levin’s meeting with his constituents in McCarren Park to explain his “yes” vote on the city’s budget probably didn’t go as he planned. (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

The Empire Center for Public Policy plans to take the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to court for allegedly violating the Freedom of Information Act for failure hand over payroll records of MTA cops. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Robert Bolden is still in the hospital for long-term heart damage after being shot with a stun gun by the NYPD and for multiple fractures to his humerus bone from last weekend’s clash between a pro-police rally and Black Lives Matter protesters in Bay Ridge. Bolden’s lawyer is calling for criminal charges against the NYPD officers who caused the damage to him. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

This is the last story I’m going to link to about the people who ran Ample Hills into the ground for a while. It’s an interview with the owners, which took place before the sale of the business after declaring bankruptcy, which was unrelated to the Covid-19 pandemic. It’s enough with these two, who are already talking about starting another ice cream-related business. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Video: 9-year-old chess champion Tanitoluwa Adewumi isn’t letting the pandemic get in his way of trying to become a chess grand master. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Mayor de Blasio signed the chokehold ban and police accountability bills into city law on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD forced a homeless man off the subway, cuffed him, beat him, and sent him to the hospital. Cy Vance chose to charge him with assault. One day later and after watching the video of the homeless man getting pepper-sprayed, punched, and pummeled by NYPD officers, District Attorney Vance decided to drop the assault charges but is continuing to pursue charges of resisting arrest. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

AOC is the latest person to pressure Governor Cuomo to back a tax on New York’s billionaires. (Jeffrey C. Mays and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Feature: Brooklynite Siobhan O’Loughlin’s art requires an interactive audience in an intimate setting. Her show Broken Bone Bathtub literally asks audience members to wash her while she sits in a tub. Under a shelter-in-place order, O’Loughlin pivoted to the heavy task of creating intimate environments with audiences regardless of distance. Her latest show, “My Heart Will Go Zoom,” tells the honest, engaging story of quarantine romance. (Hoa P Nguyen for Brooklyn Based)

9 rooftops your can visit today. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 17, 2020 – The Weekend “El Bloombito Will Not Be Bought!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The 7 train announements are now sponsored, the mayor delays on filling his MTA board seats, mystery gumball machines appear on Avenue A, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 31˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 25˚ High: 38˚

As part of an ad campaign for a new show, Awkwafina recorded announcements for stops on the 7 train. The MTA considers this a pilot program for future campaigns. There are, of course, jokes. These jokes might be funny the first time you’ll hear them. Maybe even the second or third time, but when you’re late for work because the brand new signals on the train have failed because of a light dusting of snow, hearing a joke about 69-ing might be the thing to finally send you over the edge. Of course, this is assuming you can hear the announcements at all. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

New Yorkers, of course, have opinions on the advertising campaign. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Video: Hear the announcements for yourself. (ActionKid)

@ElBloombito will not be bought! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

How to order a bagel, even if your order is wrong. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

The full Governors Ball lineup was announced for June 5-7 on Randall’s Island. Tickets go on sale today at noon. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

10 best places to work remotely in NYC. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

A guided walk through Brooklyn Heights to Cher’s house in Moonstruck, Love Lane, Truman Capote’s house, and other neighborhood highlights. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Behold: The Hot Milkman. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Carlos Beltran “stepped down” from his job as manager of the Mets as a result of his involvement as one of the major contributors to the 2017 sign-stealing Houston Astros. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Review: The Carnegie Diner, which opened this week across the street from Carnegie Hall, puts a trendy twist on the classic diner menu. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Details are beginning to emerge about Yayoi Kusama’s “KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature” exhibition at the New York Botanical Garden this summer. Paintings, sculptures, and the artist’s signature Infinity Rooms will be a part of the exhibition in what will surely be the Instagram hit of the summer. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

What are these mystery gumball machines on Avenue A? (EV Grieve)

A coalition that includes attorneys general in 14 states, the District of Columbia and New York City are suing the Agriculture Department over a plan to impose stricter work requirements on millions of food stamp recipients. (Catherine Boudreau for Politico)

If Uncut Gems was your type of movie, the Safdie Brothers released a short starring Adam Sandler about two street performers in Times Square called GOLDMAN v SILVERMAN. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Domino Sugar Refinery is a literal shell of its former self in the first step of its transformation into an office building. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

Thursday ended a horrific 24 hours in Brooklyn as three pedestrians were killed by motorists. The first killed by the driver of an SUV in the crosswalk in Clinton Hill, the second killed by the driver of a private sanitation truck in Bensonhurst in a hit and run, and the third killed by the driver of a bus after she fell out of the bus and was subsequently run over by it. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Snowy Village could bring corn dogs back in trend in the city with a Korean take on the classic beach food. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Who is to blame for these deaths? If you listen to Police Department Deputy Chief Charles Scholl of Patrol Borough Brooklyn South, the pedestrians killed should have been more “careful.” (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

A Long Island woman died Thursday after a sheet of plywood blew off scaffolding and struck her in the head. Xiang Ji, 67, was fatally struck by the plywood which fell from a building on Main Street near 41st Road in Flushing. No one asked Deputy Scholl if she was careful enough. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Congrats to ROLLN in Flatiron for creating the world’s largest nigiri sushi, weighing in at 70 pounds. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

41 percent of all New York City schools — 755 in total — are more segregated than their neighborhoods according to a new report from the Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Eagle)

A new installation in collaboration with MoMA in the 5th Avenue/53rd Street subway station shows off the history of mass transit’s iconography and signage. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Is in-unit laundry the ultimate NYC apartment amenity? (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Fearing the state’s $6 billion deficit, the mayor unveiled a city budget with the smallest percent increase during his tenure as mayor. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

NYCHA’s heat outages are still abysmal, but they’re already much better than last year. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

As Barneys completes its slow march towards retail death, workers haven’t received information about a closing date, severance pay or benefits. (Sapna Maheshwari for NY Times)

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is expected to unveil a proposal to legalize e-bikes and e-scooters in New York state at his budget address next Tuesday. (NY1)

Mayor de Blasio hasn’t filled his two MTA board appointments that are vacant and won’t before next week’s first two board meetings of the year. Good thing he has time to tweet about make believe bagel orders and chime in on memes about seating on subways, but can’t fill vacancies that have been open since June and November. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The best cocktail bars in the city. (Sarah Probst for Thrillist)

The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

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