The Briefly for September 18-19, 2020 – The “Two Protests Fall in Love” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: School openings delayed, the most dangerous ride in Coney Island, details on SNL’s new season, a guide to eating outdoors, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 69˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 50˚ High: 65˚

Human Turd Eric Trump has agreed to be interviewed by the state’s attorney general into the financing of Trump properties, but only after the presidential election. (Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

The latest figures has NYC’s unemployment rate at 16% compared to the rest of the country’s 8.4%. When the rest of the country’s unemployment rate was 3.5% in February, it was 3.4% in the city. (Greg David for The City)

Photos: At this point, it’s anyone’s guess why people are protesting outside Mayor de Blasio’s home. Actually, two independent protests met outside Gracie Mansion, and like a 2020 romantic comedy, they came together over their common hatred of the mayor. (Photos by Denice Flores Almendares for Gothamist)

In an almost cruel move, the mayor is still walking about laying off 22,000 city workers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Three months after Mayor de Blasio announced that the NYPD would stop ticketing street vendors, the NYPD took to Twitter to boast about ticketing street vendors. Christine Chung for The Dity)

Mayor de Blasio halted the decision to evict hundreds of homeless men from a temporary shelter in a hotel on the Upper West Side, but families had already started being moved out of other shelters to make room for them. A perfect de Blasio decision, no positive impact but plenty of repercussions. The worst of everything. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about the de Blasio caused Upper West Side homeless shelter saga. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

It only took a few days after business leaders sent him a letter asking him to do exactly this, but our simp mayor is now starting to talk about how companies should be sending people back to their offices. Do not be fooled by the low “rate of infection” that city and state officials throw around. The effective reproduction rate in New York still indicates that the virus is spreading and not diminishing. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The NY Taxi Workers union shut down the Brooklyn Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and FDR Drive on Thursday in a protest demanding debt forgiveness for cabbies hit hard by the pandemic. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Photos: Inside Keith Haring’s last apartment in NYC. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A firetruck t-boned an ambulance early on Thursday morning in Brooklyn, killing the man in the ambulance and injuring 12. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Is the New York yoga studio dead? (Ted Alcorn for NY Times)

On Tuesday, I introduced a City Council bill [read it here] to clear the red tape that’s allowed for racially biased, anti-pedestrian policies. The bill will effectively decriminalize “jaywalking,” which, it should be noted, was a term invented by the auto industry to shame pedestrians.
– Costa Constantinides, Astoria’s representative in City Council, Here’s Why We Should Decriminalize ‘Jaywalking’ for Streetsblog

The hopes for the Industry City rezoning hinges on the owners adding 20,000 new jobs, but even members of the service workers union that represents the current workers are losing faith in the owners. The union technically supports the rezoning, but they still haven’t reached an agreement with the site’s management since it opened in April of 2019. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

What’s the most dangerous ride in Coney Island? It might be the ferry if the city’s chosen location gets built. The city’s location is in a dangerously polluted creek that also has a few unexploded bombs sitting at the bottom of it. The locals if you could imagine, arent happy with the location. (The Coney Island Blog)

Remember I asked if the $50 fines on the subway for not wearing a mask? It took ONE day for someone to film two police officers not wearing masks in a subway station and being shits about it. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: A hazy NYC as the smoke from the West Coast has reached the east coast. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

North Brooklyn environmentalists and Pratt Institute have created an interactive map charting historic environmental pollution in Greenpoint, Williamsburg, and adjacent neighborhoods. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

When SNL starts up again in October they will have a live crowd and Jim Carry will be portraying Joe Biden, Maya Rudolph will return as Kamala Harris, and Alec Baldwin will also be back for the new season. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Sam Moyer’s Doors for Doris, built from leftover pieces of stone from around the world and cemented into doors can now be found at the Doris C. Freedman Plaza entrance to Central Park at 60th St. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Will the Hudson Yards need a second bailout? The city’s already provided $5.6 billion in tax breaks in hopes of making the money back. Sounds like a crazy idea? We already bailed it out after the 2008 crash. (Neil de Mause for Gothamist)

The city is opening a new lab to process Covid-19 tests and cut down wait times as school is almost in session and indoor dining is scheduled to start at the end of the month. The hope is that the lab will eventually process 40,000 tests a day. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

How to get a virus test result in under 48 hours. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Listen, just get a flu shot. At this point, let’s get the upper hand on any illness we possibly can. (Zainab Iqbal for Bklyner)

California, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada and Ohio are off the state’s quarantine travel list, but Puerto Rico has been added. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Apartment Porn: Chloe Sevigny’s $3.25 million prewar Park Slope apartment overlooking Prospect Park is for sale. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

A yeshiva in Queens continued holding in-person classes this week after the Mayor’s Office announced the school was shut down after more than a dozen students tested positive for coronavirus. Health officials returned and shut the school down a second time. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Is the city ready for electric scooter ride-sharing? (Dan Rivoli for NY1)

7 things we still don’t know about the school year in NYC, but really should. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

A look into how the city’s “Situation Room” for Covid-19 monitoring at schools. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Here are the 56 schools with positive Covid-19 cases before the school year even starts in person. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city already delayed in-person classes once and now they’re doing it again. Students will come back into classes in phases, starting with younger children first. I was told by a friend that this is the plan that the UFT suggested weeks ago but the mayor balked at. High schools will open on October 1. Always a last-second decision from this city. (Elisa Shapiro for NY Times)

Some students, even if they’re participating in “in-person” classes, will be logging on and actually having their classes virtually while sitting in classrooms. The high number of students that opted out of in-person classes is causing a staffing problem. All of the inconvenience and fear of sending your child to a school building with none of the benefits of them learning in a classroom! (Yoav Gonen from The City and Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The city’s blended approach to education will cost an additional $32 million a week. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

With fall here, can we still go apple picking? (Eliane Glusac for NY Times)

The governor used the figure that the MTA lost $300 million due to fare evasion a year to justify hiring 500 new NYPD officers to patrol the subways. Turns out that number is very wrong. Can we have our money back instead of these subway cops? (Jose Martinez for The City)

The ultimate guide to outdoor dining. (Eater)

Thanks to Sandra for today’s featured photo of some turtle friends!

The Briefly for August 24, 2020 – The “One Thing the Pandemic Can’t Stop” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The eviction moratorium is extended, teachers fight back against starting school, the city sued over indoor dining, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 88˚
Clear throughout the day.

Do not wait. Click here to apply for your absentee ballot today. Everyone in the city can apply.

The Times lays out why an antibody test and its results are useless if you want to know if you’ve ever had Covid-19 or if you can’t get it again. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

Here comes the fall foliage, the greatest show in New York City this fall. Also, it’s the only show in New York City this fall. Here are some spots to check out the fall foliage. (Katrina Makayan for New York Family)

Of all the things that the Covid-19 pandemic has taken away from New York, but the $2 billion AirTrain to LGA isn’t one of those things, as the FAA’s draft Environmental Impact Study concludes it “best meets the stated Purpose and Need.” (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

Even Governor Cuomo wouldn’t give an answer when asked if he has school-age kids if he would send them back to NYC schools. Classes start on September 10. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Last week teachers rallied at Grand Army Plaza against reopening the city’s schools, citing unsafe conditions, a lack of a comprehensive testing program, and decades of neglect of the buildings themselves. (Emily Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

Can the city force teachers back into classrooms if teachers feel the classrooms are unsafe? The teacher’s union has begun gauging support for a strike over school reopening plans. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The subways will continue to stay shut down overnight, but the MTA is ending its program that gave free cab rides to stranded late-night essential workers. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Steiner Studios announced plans to build a 500,000-square-foot production facility on the waterfront in Sunset Park (less than a mile south of Industry City). This is a part of the city’s “Made in NY Campus,” which the mayor announced in his last “State of the City” speech, which is supposed to offer “more attractive rents than private property owners.” The city is contributing $15 million to construction costs. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

The ACLU has released data on complaints against over 81,000 current or former NYPD officers after the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals lifted the stay which blocked them from releasing the information. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD Misconduct Complaint Database. (New York Civil Liberties Union)

It’s been four months since Francisco Garcia, an officer with a history of misconduct complaints and lawsuits and was caught on video beating a bystander and kneeling on his head while “enforcing” social distancing on the Lower East Side. It was one of the early indications that the NYPD would treat social distance enforcement like Stop And Frisk. According to the NYPD, the disciplinary process is “ongoing.” (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A look at Crocheron Park in Bayside. At a time when the city’s parks have never been more valuable, Crocheron Park has never looked worse. (Queens Crap)

The Brooklyn Museum will reopen to the public on September 12 and the Brooklyn Aquarium will be reopening on August 27. Like everything else in life in 2020, there will be new restrictions. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

All New York evictions are suspended until October 1 thanks to a ruling from the Office of Court Administration. Advocates are calling for an indefinite moratorium and landlords’ attorneys want to start evicting people yesterday. (Isaac Scher for Bushwick Daily)

As more and more types of businesses reopen, Coney Island is left behind. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

It’s hard not to make the NYU-Fyre Fest comparison with students sharing what the “meals” the school has served them. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A lawsuit against New York’s statewide plastic bag ban was struck down by the state Supreme Court. The Bodega Association and plastic bag manufacturers brought the lawsuit. Nice to see this finally come to an end (for now). (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Following the city’s July 4th celebration, the de Blasio administration is working with Macy’s to ruin the Thanksgiving day Parade in similar fashion. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city has no plans to reinstate indoor dining and 100 restauranteurs announced plans to sue the city to allow indoor dining in a reduced capacity. Outdoor dining is set to expire for the year on October 31. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Following Governor Cuomo’s “alcohol must be ordered with a substantial amount of food” is having an effect, causing the closure of the cocktail bar Mister Paradise in the East Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The State Liquor Authority has banned any advertised or ticketed music, karaoke, or other forms of live entertainment at bars and restaurants. This one is personal for me. I have been hosting socially distanced trivia since the start of July in an outdoor venue where every rule the state has implemented was strictly followed. It was free to attend, but we advertised it regularly. Is trivia entertainment? Depends on who you ask, but as of now, we have to stop. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Old Farmer’s Almanac has spoken about this coming winter. “Snowfall will be greater than normal in the Northeast.” Go to hell, Old Farmer’s Almanac. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The New York Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit challenging the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project, a multi-year effort to overhaul a stretch of the Lower East Side’s shore to protect the area from future flooding and storms. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

There will be a TONY award ceremony for the abbreviated 2019-2020 season. The show will take place this fall and it will be, of course, virtual. Broadway is currently closed through January 3, 2021, at the earliest. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Streetsblog asks a solid question: Why the hell are the double-decker tour buses still operating around the city? (Adam Light for Streetsblog)

11 inexpensive Times Square restaurants for takeout and outdoor dining. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for July 31, 2020 – The “NYC Loves Until It Destroys” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: School outbreak plans, restaurant openings and closings, looking at a billionaire’s tax, where to eat outdoor brunch, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 78˚
Rain in the morning.
This weekend – Low: 75˚ High: 85˚

Is it legal to sublet your apartment? Yes, but it’s complicated. (Localize.City)

Photos: If you’re looking for a unique experience when it comes to outdoor dining, check out the USS Baylander at the West Harlem Piers near 125th St, which has a dockside bar and restaurant. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Real Estate Porn: A $3.4 million Clinton Hill house with a haunted past. (Dana Shulz for 6sqft)

Just in time for school conversations to spin up again, here’s this headline from the Times: Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds. (Apoorva Mandavilli for NY Times)

Every student in the city is going to be issued a $420 food stamp card, regardless of their income. This creates a weird dilemma for high-income families. The money on the cards is real and if it isn’t used it’s wasted, and giving the card to someone else to use is fraud. Fortunately, there is a solution. (Matt Katz for Gothamist)

The city released plans for handling Covid-19 outbreaks in schools. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Is it possible for New Yorkers to “discover” a secluded and wonderful spot without destroying it? That’s the question across the entire city. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Without a federal stimulus, do NYC schools have enough money to open safely? (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Suraj Patel isn’t ready to concede the 12th Congressional district primary to incumbent Carolyn Mahoney, despite Mahony’s 3,700 vote lead, citing 12,000 ballots invalidated by the Board of Elections. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

He survived physical abuse, homelessness, and gang violence before coming to America as a refugee, where a homeless shelter trashed his wheelchairs while Saheed Adebayo Aare was put in a Manhattan isolation hotel. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Looking for somewhere new and weird to explore? Check out Dead Horse Inlet and Dead Horse Bay. (Kevin Wash for Forgotten New York)

The New York Liberty has a new CEO, just like the Brooklyn Nets do. Joe Tsai owns both teams and has been taking steps to put them both on equal footing with the installation of Keia Clark as CEO of the Liberty with the eventual goal of bringing the Liberty to the Barclays Center once possible. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Interview: Amanda Cohen, the chef and owner of Dirt Candy on if the no-tipping movement can survive the pandemic. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

The Department of Environmental Protection is looking to delay the Gowanus Canal cleanup from somewhere between 12 to 18 months due to declining revenues during the pandemic. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Remember when Governor Cuomo promised states that when New York was over the Covid-19 hump, he’d start sending help? Florida is the first recipient of his pledge, with the state sending gowns, gloves, masks, face shields, and hand santizer. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state’s legislature is introducing bills to try to prevent a doomsday scenario in the city where a rise in apartment vacancies could put an end to rent regulation. Under the current laws, when more than 5% of NYC apartments are vacant, rent regulation would come to an end. Building apartments and intentionally keeping them empty or working as hard as possible to evict tenants to drive up the vacancy rate sounds like a conspiracy but I’ll never put anything past landlords. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Governor Cuomo is against raising taxes on billionaires but seems to be totally cool with raising MTA fares and tolls on bridges, essentially taxing every non-billionaire instead. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The arguments for and against the constitutionality of a billionaires’ tax. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

June and July bring the summer’s heat, but it also brings nesting turtles onto the runways of JFK airport. Inside the annual struggle to protect the turtles in Jamaica Bay. (Lori Chung for NY1)

Even if Columbia University attempts to return to in-person classes in the call a strike by maintenance workers could halt their plans completely unless a new contract is agreed to by Friday night. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

With no help from the Yankees, the 161st St BID is trying to create a welcoming atmosphere around the stadium to help many of the area’s struggling businesses. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

McCarren Tennis Center’s weatherproof bubble over the public tennis courts will stay up all summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

Only around 14 percent of state prison inmates have been tested for Covid-19 since the crisis began. I’m no epidemiologist, but that seems like a low percentage. In comparison, there has been 2.596 million tests conducted in the city, which would cover about 30% of the population. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Tropical Storm Isaias may make landfall in NYC on Monday because things aren’t hard enough already. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What to expect at today’s “Take Your Knee Off Our Necks” in Midtown. (NY1)

Mayor Bill de Blasio is making the New York City court system into a scapegoat for the recent surge in gun violence according to Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks. (NY1)

Queens got a Black Lives Matter mural in front of the Family Court on Jamaica Avenue. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Get ready, because it’s ConEd blackout season. Southern Brooklyn was the first to be asked to turn down their electrical usage. (Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Where to get takeout in Greenwich Village and the West Village. Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The MTA is installing free mask dispensers inside city buses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Augustine in the Financial DIstrict. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Rosario’s Pizza on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

A list of the Williamsburg & Greenpoint places closed for good during COVID-19. (Bill Pearis for Greenpointers)

Farewell to Le Sia in the East Village. (EV Grieve)

Farewell to An Choi on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Union Pool’s patio and taco truck are back! (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Mott Street from Worth to Moscoe is closed off to cars and 10 restaurants all have outdoor dining with seating for over 100. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Where to eat outside on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The best outdoor brunch spots in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!