The Briefly for October 2, 2019 – The “Hamlet VIII is the City’s Fanciest Kitty” Edition

Welcome to Zombie Summer, we are all subsidizing wealthy New Yorkers’ ferry commutes, Peter Luger’s burger is no longer the king, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Welcome to Zombie Summer. (Gothamist)

The Peter Luger’s burger is regularly considered the best burger in the city, but it seems you have one less reason to go to Williamsburg, because there may be a new king in the Red Hook Tavern’s cheeseburger. Long live the king. (Eater)

NYC Ferries were, according to the mayor, supposed to connect disconnected neighborhoods and be one of many transit options for all New Yorkers, but it turns out that more than 60% of heavily subsidized riders are white and earn over $75,000 a year. (6sqft)

The most diverse line is the Soundview line, which connects the Bronx to Lower Manhattan. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Meet Hamlet VIII, the fanciest cat in New York City. (Time Out)

Say hello to the startups trying to disrupt the apartment security deposit. (NY Times)

There’s a new deli in Rockefeller Center, but nothing in this deli is edible. Delicatessen on 6th is an installation from artist Lucy Sparrow where everything is made of felt. (Untapped Cities)

14 new public art installations in October. (Untapped Cities)

Here comes the talk about an East coast hyperloop from NYC to Washington DC. (6sqft)

One of the most memorable sandwiches in New York City is the cresia sandwich at Cremini’s in Carroll Gardens, according to Robert Sietsema. (Eater)

Gothamist is hiring a news editor. (Gothamist)

TJ Atoms is portraying ODB, one of rap’s icons in Hulu’s ‘Wu-Tang Clan,’ no pressure, right? (amNY)

How vulnerable is Max Rose, the centrist Democrat who represents Staten Island and parts of South Brooklyn in the House of Representatives? (Gotham Gazette)

Lower Manhattan is considering its defenses against its greatest enemy: the sea. The city is considering extending the shoreline of Battery Park City and the Financial District by about 500 feet to combat the effects of climate change. (Curbed)

The city’s poverty rate is at a recent historic low, which is measured at a household with two adults and two children at $32,402. Despite this, the rate of inequality in the city remains exactly the same as when Mayor de Blasio first took office. (Gothamist)

State senators are calling for a more transparent investigation into National Grid for denying gas to thousands of new and existing customers in retaliation for not approving a new gas pipeline. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Giuliani-era law that attempted to zone strip clubs and sex shops out of existence is still being litigated, with U.S. District Judge William Pauley ruling in favor of adult establishments, citing how the city has changed in the 25 years since the laws were put in place. (Patch)

Two boys are missing after going swimming off Rockaway Beach on Tuesday. A third teenager was with them, but he was rescued by some surfers. (amNY)

The key to saving our food may be urban beekeeping. (HuffPost)

More annoying than someone in front of you at a show holding up their phone at a show to block your view is having to leave your phone in a locked bag before you get into the show, and more and more shows are using this system. (Gothamist)

Two pieces of the Manhattan Bridge were removed over the weekend due to containing lead and being structurally unsound. The globes will be replaced with replicas that don’t pose a potential risk. (Gothamist)

Here are the 10 vegetarian restaurants that are among the top 50 in the nation, according to OpenTable. (Patch)

The Briefly for September 25, 2019 – The “Worst Possible Possible Candidate for Mayor” Edition

The Strand sues the city, treating carbon emissions like money, the LinkNYC Teletubbies, the East Side Protection plan approved, vegan restaurants, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Strand will sue the city in federal court to try to remove the landmark status of its building with the idea that the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s decision is an unconstitutional taking of private property. (Gothamist)

Tomokazu Matsuyama’s mural on the Bowery Wall is one of the most complex murals I can recall for the wall and took two weeks for the artist and 10 assistants working 12 hour days to complete. (Downtown Express)

Donald Trump Jr has decided not to run for mayor of NYC, despite past comments and wanting to. (Jezebel)

Whoever dressed up a bunch of LinkNYC kiosks like Teletubbies, you are a hero. (Gothamist)

The real estate and development industries don’t have a unifying board or mouthpiece that speaks for them, so when it comes to huge issues like climate change and carbon emissions everyone’s voice is singular. Where does the industry that creates 75% of NYC’s 52 metric tons of emissions stand? (The Real Deal)

62-year-old MD Abul Bashar died from injuries sustained on September 18 from being hit by a Lomangino Brothers dump truck, making him the 23rd cyclist to be killed in 2019 by a vehicle on NYC streets. 2018’s number was 10. (Streetsblog)

The East Side flood protection plan was approved by the City Planning Commission, despite outcry from the public that the city’s timeline seems unrealistic. (Curbed)

The Midtown Dean & DeLuca is now closed, leaving only the flagship in Soho open. (NY Times)

3 million public parking spaces, or 12 Central Parks, worth of space being used as storage for private property. Maybe it could be put to better use? (Gothamist)

There are still many unanswered questions about the man who jumped in front of a 4 train holding his daughter on Monday morning. The latest reports say that the five-year-old daughter is physically unharmed while Fernando Balbuena-Flores was pronounced dead by the FDNY. (Gothamist)

The NYPD will enact multiple suggestions in an attempt to end suicides on the force, which includes 9 active and 2 retired members in 2019. The Department of Investigations suggested adding a wellness outreach unit with a psychologist, social worker, and police officer for every 1,000 officers, a training program to adjust to civilian life, and more. (amNY)

Swedish coffee chain Fika abruptly closed all seven of its NYC stores following a recent bankruptcy filing. (Eater)

Think you’ve got what it takes to become “Miss Subways?” Applications are being accepted through the 29th with the pageant taking place on October 3. (amNY

The city’s law that bans pre-employment drug tests for marijuana goes into effect in May 2020 and in the process will change HR policies nationwide. (amNY)

The City Council is poised to change control over Hart Island from the Department of Corrections to the Department of Parks and Recreation with a new package of bills. (Politico)

Chipotle employees in 20 locations all over the city went on strike on Tuesday over complaints of labor violations. Would you like illegal scheduling and denying extra pay with your burrito bowl? (Splinter)

The City Council will look at a bill that would treat our carbon emissions like our finances, taking inspiration from a model created by Oslo, Norway. (HuffPost)

In New York, it is a misdemeanor to claim to be able to use “occult powers, to answer questions or give advice on personal matters or to exorcise, influence or affect evil spirits or curses,” but it’s legal to do so “for entertainment purposes only.” Three spiritual advisors on the Upper West Side crossed over that line and owe their victims $60,000. (NY Times)

Amid a sexual harassment inquiry, Plácido Domingo left the Met Opera. (NY Times)

Williamsburg’s N 6th St is now the “hottest street” in Brooklyn when it comes to retail. (Bedford + Bowery)

19 rock-solid vegan restaurants in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 21, 2019 – The “Bragging About Being Better Than Queens” Edition

Two Proud Boys are convicted, Cuomo bans floating billboards, the city’s secret waterfalls, the Ritz-Carlton penthouse is for sale, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

What are your neighbors complaining about the most? (The Real Deal)

The latest exhibit at the Transit Museum focuses on the history of subway signs. (Untapped Cities)

Have you been indoctrinated into the cult of cauliflower gnocchi? (Grub Street)

Nothing is as Brooklyn as bragging about being better than Queens. (Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: The abandoned Miller Air Field in Staten Island. (Untapped Cities)

Manero’s Pizza has stepped into the city’s pizza battles with a hybrid New York/Neapolitan slice. (Grub Street)

It’s not a pre-snowstorm run on food, this disaster is the modern-day Dean & Deluca’s. (Eater)

A guide to $1 happy hour oysters, the holy grail, in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The safest neighborhoods in the city. (StreeyEasy)

Wayla vs Wayan vs Wayo. Getting the restaurant names straight in the city isn’t as always simple. (Eater)

Following the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, activists have named five additional officers who they say should be fired for their connection to the death of Eric Garner. (Politico)

New York joined the lawsuit against the federal government over the finalized changes to the “public charge” rule, which will deny citizenship, visas, and green cards to immigrants enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (amNY)

July was the tenth hottest month in NYC history. (Gothamist)

Where to find the city’s secret waterfalls. (6sqft)

Not on the list is the Marcy Houses, where tenants were battling a waterfall in their stairwell due to a burst pipe. (Patch)

The mayor has claimed victory in reforming the NYPD, but the reality isn’t as simple. (Gotham Gazette)

The AirTrain to JFK will be increasing in price from $5 to $7.75 starting November 1. (Second Ave Sagas)

The digital billboards that have been floating around Manhattan are illegal as of Monday, when Governor Cuomo signed a bill to law making them immediately illegal. The company behind the billboards has vowed to find a new loophole to continue their annoying goal of making sure New Yorkers are always looking at advertising somewhere. (NY Times)

Everyone is prone to make real estate mistakes, but not everyone writes an essay for Domino Magazine about it, but then again Lena Dunham isn’t everyone. (Domino)

Vendors could be banned from the Dyker Heights Christmas lights displays this year because of the volume of trash visitors left lying around in previous years. New Yorkers are renown for disposing of their garbage anywhere they’d like, and a neighborhood that’s residential through most of the year isn’t meant to hold the trash of 150,000 visitors. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed to address the homelessness crisis in his last mayoral campaign, but critics say his plans are falling short. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo signed the “Deed Theft Bill” into law, which provides greater protections for owners of homes that are in default or foreclosure. (Kings County Politics)

Does the opening of the Brooklyn Grange, the city’s largest rooftop farm, signal a real change for the city? (Brooklyn Based)

Maxwell Hare, 27, and John Kinsman, 39, guilty of attempted gang assault, attempted assault, and rioting as part of the Proud Boys fight on the Upper East Side in October of last year. They’ll be sentenced in October and face up to 15 years in prison. (Gothamist)

The best new restaurants on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The ultimate guide to renting in NYC. (Curbed)

If you’ve got $49 million and a burning desire to live in the Ritz-Carlton’s penthouse, I’ve got an apartment to sell you. (The Real Deal)

The PlayStation Theater in Times Square will be closing January 1. The last shows at the theater will be a four-night run by the Disco Biscuits. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Nike York City? The city agreed to license its logo and a few dozen other ephemera to Nike to print them on its merchandise. Does anyone want an NYPD Bomb Squad sneaker? (Patch)

Here are the companies in NYC with the fastest revenue growth. (Patch)

Whatever a “classic NYC experience” is, amNY has a list of restaurants where you can still experience it. (amNY)