The Briefly for June 29, 2020 – The “Even Aliens and UFOs Have Left New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Macy’s unannounced fireworks start tonight, the NYPD pepper-sprays a Pride march, open street dining, beaches opening this week and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

Get ready, because tonight starts Macy’s ill-conceived fireworks displays across the city for the next five nights. The city said they will send notifications a few minutes before they start(Ron Lee for NY1)

The story of Charlie H. Cochrane, Jr., the NYPD’s first openly gay cop, who joined the force in 1967. (Carey Reed Zamarriego for Untapped Cities)

Photos: Pride Weekend’s Drag March. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

More Photos: The Drag March. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD celebrated Pride in their traditional style by pepper-spraying and arresting participants of the Queer Liberation March during a dance party in Washington Square Park. (Duncan Osborne for Gothamist)

Answering questions about the availability of the NYPD’s disciplinary records, which will become available in July. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

17 members of the city’s Corrections Department will face departmental charges for their roles in the death of Rikers Island inmate Layleen Polanco last June. Bronx District Attorney Darcel D. Clark and the city’s Department of Investigation have refused to pursue criminal charges. (Jan Ransom and Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

How Occupy City Hall’s 24-hour protests came to be. (Juliana Kim, photos by Amr Alfiky for NY Times)

“Yet on day one of his mayoralty, de Blasio betrayed his word—and even more, the Black and Hispanic communities of New York City—by bringing back an even more blatantly discriminatory policing strategy: the practice of aggressive misdemeanor arrests known as “broken windows policing.””
-Bernard E. Harcourt, professor of law and political science at Columbia University, for Gothamist, Mayor De Blasio’s Police Strategy Has Always Been Racist

The number of UFOs reported across America in the first three months of the year shot up by 112%, but New York’s UFO sightings are among the country’s lowest. Even the aliens know it’s not a good time to see the city. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The headline says it best: The Garbage-Scented, Siren-Laden, and Yet Still Pleasant Reality of Dining Outside Right Now (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

There are over 5,650 restaurants open for outdoor dining in the city, the Department of Transportation has an interactive map. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe some of these locations need to be double-checked since they’re in the middle of bike lanes, which is forbidden by the new guidelines. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The experience of a day of phase two inside Veselka. (Ryan Sutton, photos by Gary He for Eater)

Six ways restaurants have been innovating to enforce social distancing. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The state has extended its to-go cocktail laws for an additional 30 days. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Five years of lessons learned from writing about food and dining. (Serena Dai for Eater, good luck on your new gig)

“For years, the NYPD has used the city’s public drinking laws as a simple pretext for the harassment of communities of color. Of the 15 city police precincts that wrote the most summonses for open-containers in 2010, 12 were located in communities of color. A separate Brooklyn study found that 85 percent of open container citations in that borough were given to Black and brown residents, and only 4 percent to whites.”
-Shabazz Stuart, CEO of Oonee, for Streetsblog, It’s Time to Legalize Public Drinking for All New Yorkers

Dog runs, basketball courts, tennis courts, volleyball courts, handball courts, and bocce courts are returning to the city’s parks with phase three. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything known about indoor dining, which starts on July 6 in phase three of the city’s reopening. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

For the second time in two decades, the MTA is facing a “doomsday budget.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

James Dolan owns Madison Square Garden and the Knicks and might be one of the biggest idiots in the entire city. The CDC’s website with information on Covid-19 antibodies clearly states “Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last.” Has that stopped James Dolan from saying he wants to fill Madison Square Garden with people who have tested positive for antibodies for a benefit show? No it has not. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A deeper dive into the Summer Youth Employment Program, how its elimination by the de Blasio administration disproportionally affects people of color, and why kids are fighting to bring it back. (Rainer Harris for Curbed)

Red Hook’s Fairway will close by July 17. The landlord will look for a grocery store to take its place. (Liena Zagare for BKLYNER)

Mayor de Blasio is calling for a full eviction moratorium through August 20 and for the state place tenants who miss rent on a year-long payment plan to make up for back rent once they are able to work. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

New York Hall of Science won’t be reopening in 2020, opting for a 2021 date. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Getting students into classrooms in the fall, if that is an option at all, will be a difficult task. The CDC calling for children to be six feet apart, which would be impossible in the city’s 150 schools that are already operating at a capacity of 150% or more. For instance, Francis Lewis High School in Queens is built for 2,188, has 4,492 students and capacity will have to be cut to around 1,000. Whatever happens, school will not be returning to normal in the fall. (Ashleigh Garrison for Chalkbeat)

RIP Milton Glaser, who created the I ♥ NY logo. (William Grimes for NY Times)

It’s a great apartment that will be plagued with construction noise through 2035, but you’ll be close to the trains! (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Spring training hasn’t begun yet and Vegas is already predicting a better season for the Yankees than the Mets. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral welcomed people for Sunday Mass for the first time since March. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s affordable housing lottery is anything but fair to the people who can afford the least. For each apartment available for “extremely low-income” families there are 650 applicants. That is nearly 5x as many applicants for apartments for families making between $122k and $168k/year. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Sunday’s double rainbow. What does it mean? (EV Grieve)

Do you know what this city doesn’t need? A sinkhole problem. A sinkhole nearly ate an SUV on the Lower East Side over the weekend. (EV Grieve)

There are nine NYC beaches opening for swimming on July 1st. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 2, 2020 – The “Repeal Civil Rights Law Section 50-a” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: An NYPD union is suspended from Twitter, the arguments for defunding the NYPD, Revel and Citi Bike shut down during curfew, cute trash pandas, and more

Today – Low: 63˚ High: 71˚
Rain overnight.

Over the weekend, an NYPD officer pulled his gun out and pointed it at a crowd of protestors and it was caught on video. The NYPD is conducting an internal review, but the mayor took no time to call for this cop’s gun and badge. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

The NYPD’s union has spent millions of dollars protecting Civil Rights Law section 50-a, which prohibits the city from releasing findings of misbehavior of NYPD cops, and they are getting ready to dig into their pockets to fight reform, which has the support of the governor and mayor. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

On the state senate’s website, you can sign your support for the repeal of 50-a.

The cries to defund the NYPD are getting louder and they’re starting to come from elected officials. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

It took public shaming from AOC to Corey Johnson to literally everyone who saw the footage, but the mayor is ready to admit that the NYPD driving an SUV into a crowd of people is “dangerous and unacceptable” and doesn’t think he “expressed it as well as I should have.” (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

When Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux designed Union Square, they specifically designed a portion of the park for public gatherings and protests. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

“We have to call out everyone who says anything that is racist, on any level. Don’t be scared of telling Cuomo that he’s speaking racist language. If you sit in these city agency and Corporate meetings as a black person but afraid to call racism out then YOU are part of the problem. Stop being scared. Be strong for your children and grandchildren.”
– Vernon Jones / CEO of JIG Media for East New York News, The NYPD Slave Catching Tactics Give Reason to Create a New Way To Hold Police Accountable for Their Violations Against Black New Yorkers

At 11:00 last night, the first night of NYC’s curfew, I found myself on my way home from the people gathering outside Brooklyn’s 77th precinct, realizing I could have gotten there quicker had I jumped on a Revel or Citi Bike but kept walking anyway. I was wrong because both services shut down at 11 pm with the curfew. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

“It’s a mafia mentality. It’s a ‘If you speak out against us, you’re not with us’ kind of deal. If the writing on the wall is ‘let’s go arrest people’ and the people happen to be black, [then you have to do it or] you’re not with us. It’s a shit system.” An interview with a Brooklyn cop. (Zainab Iqbal for BKLYNER)

Two Brooklynites and one upstate New Yorker were arraigned in federal court for allegedly throwing Molotov cocktails at police cars in two separate incidents during protests against police brutality on May 30. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

Manhattan state Senator Brad Hoylman called upon the city’s five district attorneys Monday not to prosecute people arrested for disorderly conduct or unlawful assembly during protests, charging that “protesting injustice is not a crime.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

“We can no longer tolerate the police officers who do not uphold the rule of law but instead engage in murder, assault and racial profiling, and then protect each other.”
– Francis Greenburger and Cheryl Roberts for amNew York Metro, Is there any justice left in America?

How did you learn about the arrest of the mayor’s daughter? The same way the mayor did, he read about it in the news. How did the information about the mayor’s daughter get to the news? The union that represents the NYPD’s sergeants tweeted out personal information about Chiara de Blasio. They were temporarily suspended from Twitter for the privacy breach. (Dana Rubenstein and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

“Behind the crowd, a four-year-old black boy tried to teach his baby brother how to clap hands. He held his hands and moved them towards as the crowd loudly clapped and shouted: “I can’t breathe.” ” (Ali Tufan Koc for Bedford + Bowery)

“I am tired. Tired of how routine violence against African Americans at the hands of white people has been and continues to be. Angry as a journalist that this has happened so often that we all know the angles that must be covered, the questions to be asked, the stories to be written. Angrier still that as an African American journalist, I must explain, again and again, how dehumanizing this all is.”
– Amanda Barrett for Brooklyn Eagle, American Diary: To be Black and a journalist at this moment

Five things to know if you’re going out to protest in New York City. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Council Speaker Corey Johnson and Bronx Councilmember Ritchie Torres are demanding an independent investigation into the NYPD’s actions during a weekend of protests, challenging Mayor de Blasio’s plan to direct the Corporation Counsel and Department of Investigations to investigate. They want an investigation that is not done by any office controlled by the mayor. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

10 riots in the city’s history. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

This will be the only mention of damage caused in Soho during protests. Don’t mix the message of protestors with the damage of looters. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery) note: I’m not saying that Bedford + Bowery is doing this, they do a good job of pointing out that the damage was caused by people separate from the George Floyd protests.

Adorable: To close out today, here are some photos of a trash panda and her babies of Carroll Park, who have taken up residence ever since the park has been closed to people. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking, photos by Gary Dolan)

The Briefly for May 29, 2020 – The “Our ‘Let Someone Else Figure It Out’ Mayor” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The future of movie theaters, George Floyd demonstrations, the city’s contact tracing program is a mess, the Tompkins Square hawks grow up, and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 75˚
Possible drizzle overnight.
This weekend – Low: 53˚ High: 79˚

The City Council is pushing a sidewalk-table bill forward that would allow restaurants to apply for permits that would expire on October 31 for outdoor dining. This isn’t a revolutionary idea, even Cincinnatti got it done already. Mayor de Blasio’s complete lack of leadership constantly leaves voids for others to fill. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

When the city starts phase one of reopening, employees of construction jobs, wholesale, manufacturing, agriculture, and retail companies (with safety procedures in place) can go back to work. This will mean somewhere between 200,000 and 400,000 New Yorkers will return to work. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Once New yorkers start to get back to work, how are they getting there? Are the city and state committed to making sure that our public transportation can get those workers to work safely? Our mayor, not known for being proactive, is leaving that decision up to workers and is expecting that the “short-term reality” is that there will be a spike in drivers. No talk about making sure the subways and buses are safe and will be ready no conversation about more opportunities for bicycles, just more cars. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

All the borough presidents have sent a letter to the mayor demanding the city set aside 40 miles of “emergency” bus lanes to get ahead of the expected car congestion. My favorite bit of reporting from this article is “In a press conference on Thursday, the mayor did not allude specifically to the letters, but told reporters that he’s thinking about what to do, but hasn’t done anything yet.” Beautiful. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

So you’ve made sourdough bread, countless cocktails, Shake Shack sauces, Junior’s cheesecakes, and pizza at home during the pandemic. What’s next? Boba Guys have a DIY bubble tea kit. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The same groups that sued the city over its stop-and-frisk policy have sued the city over the NYPD’s Covid-19 social distancing enforcement, calling it “stop and frisk 2.0.” Their original case against the city led to a ruling that declared stop and frisk unconstitutional and racially discriminatory. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

Union Square was full of protestors on Thursday night as a part of nationwide demonstrations sparked by the killing of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police. The demonstrators were met with an aggressive police presence, including an eye witness seeing an officer put a knee on someone’s neck as a part of their arrest. Another rally is planned for 4 pm in Foley Square and at night outside the Barclays Center. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: 10 weeks of a quiet Tribeca. (Tribeca Citizen)

Video: Over 100 years of bread-baking experience at Madonia Bakery in the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Williamsburg has a new mural, courtesy of street artist Swoon, on S. Fifth Street. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

When we think back to what was different about the summer of 2020, the return of drive-in movies to the city should be close to the top of the list. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Five tech-forward strategies restaurants are testing to ease back into dining in NYC. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Times’ review of the animated “Central Park” on Apple TV+ from the makers of Bob’s Burgers: “Delightful, not depressing.” (James Poniewozik for NY Times)

Video: The stunning sights of empty NYC landmarks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

One of the reasons that I love New York City is that a headline that reads “Gay, democratic-socialist candidate leads Clinton Hill state senate race in fundraising” is not remotely out of the ordinary. One reason Jabari Brisport is out ahead for his senate race is the support of Bernie Sanders’ Our Revolution. (Matt Tracy for Brooklyn Paper)

A feature on artist Sara Erenthal, whose work you’ve likely strewn about the city, and her latest series of work dedicated to the city under lockdown. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

How many of the city’s 1.1 million students are taking classes online? Don’t ask the Department of Education. No, seriously, don’t ask because they don’t know. (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Movie theaters are a part of phase four of New York’s reopening plan, which could be July or later. What will movie theaters look like when they reopen? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

No mask, no service. The governor signed an executive order allowing businesses to refuse service to people for not wearing masks. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Maybe it was partially inspired by this video of Staten Islanders screaming at an unmasked woman to get the hell out of a grocery store until she left. (TMZ)

How do you wear a mask to a bar or restaurant? Good question. Grub Street dives in. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Bobby Catone, known jackass and owner of a tanning salon on Staten Island, opened his tanning salon for a moment on Thursday morning when he was warned by police he could be thrown in jail and have his license revoked if he disobeys and opens his salon again. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Hillary Swank’s former townhouse in the West Village sold for $9.8 million. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

More than 190,000 New Yorkers applied for unemployment last week as national joblessness rates reached 41 million. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city supposedly hired over 1,700 contract tracers, but the reality of the situation is uncertain and the blame is being put on Mayor de Blasio for making NYC Health & Hospitals in charge of the effort instead of the Department of Health. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Museum will become a temporary food pantry starting in June. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

It’s art you’ll need a drone to appreciate. Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada is painting a 20,000 square-foot mural in Flushing Meadows/Corona Park. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Photos: The Tompkins Square hawks are growing up right before our eyes. (Lauge Goggin Photography)

The mayor is flirting with a financial tactic with the intention of digging the city out of its current financial hole that brought the city to the brink of bankruptcy in the 1970s. The idea is to borrow up to $7 billion from the state, which would put the city on the hook for $500 million payments for the next twenty years. The idea was called “fiscally questionable” by the governor. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní, Jeffery C. Mays and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Thank you to reader Laura for today’s featured photo!