The Briefly for June 14, 2019 – The “A Plan To Save Us All From the Sea” Edition

The religious exemption for vaccines is ending, a ball-pit bar is coming to Brooklyn, the weekend subway service changes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This is the end of the religious exemption from vaccines in New York state. The legislature agreed on a bill and the governor has said he would sign it to prevent future public health crises similar to the current measles outbreak. (NY Times)

It’s the weekend, so usual “check the subways before you go anywhere” rules apply. (Subway Weekender)

Get to know your Queens District Attorney candidates. (Queens Crap)

Jon Stewart, New York’s collective voice, had a heck of a week. It opened with shaming Congress, which resulted in moving the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund moving forward, and ended with an extremely personal gift from some grateful firefighters. (Gothamist)

The United States Army Corps of Engineers released a series of plans to save New York from when the sea rises up to eat us. Each of the proposals will cost billions of dollars and would dramatically change the city’s coastline. A plan will be selected either later this year or early next year. The plans range from a 25-year construction that would cost over $100 billion to nine years and cost about $15 billion. (Curbed)

The park at Essex Crossing in the Lower East Side is now open. (6sqft)

A 4-alarm fire broke out in Midwood that injured twelve and spread through three houses and was caught on fire. Three firefighters were among the twelve. (Gothamist)

Sometimes justice moves slowly. Elizabeth Lederer, the lead prosecutor in the Central Park Five case, will not return as a lecturer at Columbia Law School after the release of Netflix’s “When They See Us.” (amNY)

Here are the important points of info you need to know about the new rent reform package. (Gothamist)

There’s more to Coney Island than Nathan’s and Totonno’s. 9 places to eat in Coney Island, but honestly, all you need to know is Dona Zita. (Eater)

The 11234 zip code, where you can find Bergen Beach, Mill Basin and Flatlands, has more baby boomers than any other zipcode in the United States. The city has 14 of the top 20 zip codes for boomers, with the city holding the top four spots. (Patch)

The old Coffee Shop in Union Square is going to become a Chase Bank. (Gothamist)

There’s an office tower in Manhattan unfortunately named “Penn15.” (The Real Deal)

Where to eat a last minute dinner in the East Village. (The Infatuation)

The people in the city’s homeless shelters are treated like numbers and the employees of the Department of Homeless Services appears to be abusing “emergency” transfers to move people around for seemingly no reason. (NY Times)

Is El Museo del Barrio turning its back on the local Latinx community? The Mirror Manifesto, an open letter signed by artists, was read while protestors occupied the museum’s 50th Anniversary celebrations. (Gothamist)

Starting July 1, the NYPD will take a different tact with people who are homeless on the subway and commit minor infractions. Instead of a summons, they will be sent to a detox facility, shelter, or to get other kinds of help as needed. The purpose of the pilot program is to divert people away from the court system and to work to minimize subway disruptions, which had tripled in the last few years. (Patch)

Remember the most expensive apartment in the city? The one that came with two tickets two space, a yacht, two full-time servants, and a bevy of other amenities that seemed too good to be true? Turns out it was a fake and a marketing tactic for the building. The listing was a combination of about a dozen different apartments on the 45th floor. (Curbed)

What’s the best time of year to look for an apartment in the city? StreetEasy broke it down neighborhood by neighborhood, and we’re heading into the worst time of year for most areas. (Curbed)

It might not be surprising that the neighborhoods with the most excessive airplane noise are in Queens, with Brookville, Howard Beach, and Flushing topping the list. (Localize.Labs)

If you’ve fallen in love with the MTA’s new rainbow transit heart, you can find it on some of the city’s 1 trains and on MetroCards. Five subway trains are sporting the MTA Pride logo and you can get special edition World Pride MetroCards at a few select subway stations. (Gothamist)

The unofficial MTA Pride Train signs are back across the city. (amNY)

Turns out dads can be stay-at-home parents too! Who knew? (amNY)

There’s coffee and then there’s coffee. Sawada, a Tokyo-style cafe, is “one of the most genuinely inspired additions to the New York coffee scene in some time.” (Eater)

The Barclays Center announced a free summer concert series featuring Andy Suzuki & The Method, Nappy Nina and Dj Donwill, DJ Mick, and more. (The Brooklyn Reader)

An analysis from the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs indicates that the president’s immigration policies are having a chilling effect on immigrants using SNAP benefits. The rate of non-citizens dropping out of the program is four times higher than citizens dropping out. (NY Times)

Let’s ask the scary questions. How safe is the elevator in your building? (the Real Deal)

Let’s all say farewell to the small superheroes of NYC, with the last season of Jessica Jones closing out The Defenders’ run on Netflix. Daredevil, Iron Fist, Luke Cage, Punisher, and Jessica Jones were New York City’s heroes and the fun game of where was that filmed?” will have to be reserved for re-watches. (amNY)

They don’t make subway stations like they used to. This time it was Atlantic Terminal that saw a crumbling ceiling along the D, N, R tracks. This incident can be attributed to a non-MTA contractor puncturing the ceiling while taking a soil sample above ground, but add it to the list of inconveniences we all absorb on a daily basis. (amNY)

A ball-pit bar is coming to… no not Bushwick, but very close to it. (Gothamist)

Inside the NYPL’s Stonewall exhibition. (Gothamist)

This week in NIMBY news: The homeless shelter on Billionaire’s Row has cleared a legal hurdle but the neighborhood continues to fight against it. (Curbed)

In more NIMBY news, Community Board 2 has overwhelmingly voted against the mayor’s Rikers Island neighborhood replacement. (Brooklyn Paper)

The Grub Street guide to the summer’s “Can’t-Miss” food festivals. (Grub Street)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for September 18, 2018 – NYC vs DOJ, a Seven Alarm Fire, the U.N. and More

Midtown will slow down even more once the U.N. is in town, the DOJ comments about safe injection sites, de Blasio deflects school bus complaints and more.

What you need to know about the United Nations general assembly that’s starting this week.

The worst days of the year for driving in Manhattan aren’t Christmas or Thanksgiving, it’s when the U.N. is in session. In Midtown, traffic slows from the average of 4.7mph to 3mph and the city’s new message is simple: “Your trip through Midtown will take three times as long.”

The bridge that connects Brooklyn Bridge Park and the Brooklyn Heights is indefinitely closed. It seems that high moisture levels are causing the problem with the bridge. That’s outside. Near the water.

The creepy LinkNYC/ice cream jingle mystery is one step closer to being solved.

A seven alarm fire broke out at Kings Plaza Mall’s parking garage. Avon Stephens, 23, was arrested for causing damage to over 100 Mercedes-Benzes. A local dealership was storing cars there, not everyone who goes to Kings Plaza drives a Benz. No one suffered life-threatening injuries. He said he was sorry.

Rose III by Isa Genzken is a new 26-foot-tall sculpture of a rose in Zuccotti Park.

Cuomo defeated Nixon and Gothamist asks “Are the subways screwed forever?

Joe Crowley will remain chairman of the Queens Democratic Party after being defeated by Amexandria Ocasio-Cortez. He’s remained the chairman since 2006.

A 33-year-old man was found dead at Union Square after attempting to walk between train cars while moving.

Just when you thought it was safe to go back on Instagram, here comes Human’s Best Friend. It’s an Instagram bait installation, but it’s for dogs.

What’s going on with Australian coffee culture in the city?

The man behind the Society for Indecency to Naked Animals, Alan Abel, has earned himself a second obituary in The New York Times 38 years after his first.

The Justice Department is calling NYC’s proposed safe injection sites a “violation of the Controlled Substances Act.” This is coming to a head after a letter from state Assembly member Nicole Malliotakis (R-Staten Island) was sent to the DOJ.

Mayor de Blasio is blaming bus companies for the 82,225 complaints the DOE has already received in the first two weeks of school, but no action has yet been taken by his administration.


Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.