The Briefly for June 19, 2020 – The “Here Comes Phase Two” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Ways to honor Juneteenth, a true bike lane for the Brooklyn Bridge is possible, NYC’s latest notable racist, the Rent Guidelines Board vote, and more

Today – Low: 68˚ High: 78˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 68˚ High: 79˚

A guide to Juneteenth marching, mourning, picnicking, and dancing. (Emmy Freedman and Erin O’Brien)

We’re only at the tail end of phase one, but why are some people acting like we’re past it all? (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

It’s official, we’re headed to phase two on Monday. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

What this also means is that outdoor dining returns on Monday. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Let’s hope we don’t see more clusters of idiots hanging out outside bars in large groups drinking and eating. Governor Cuomo has expanded the power os the State Liquor Authority to revoke or suspend liquor licenses for restaurants and bars that don’t enforce proper social distancing rules. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The Department of Transportation is in talks with Mayor Bill de Blasio to study turning a roadway on the Brooklyn Bridge into a bike lane. Someone check to see if hell’s frozen over yet. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

There will always be people who naysay transportation evolutions. In Flushing, Queens, the businesses on Main Street are the ones making a stink about it. (Dan Rivoli for NY1)

Remember when the city pledged to bring a bike-share program with 1,000 dockless bikes to Staten Island? Bike sales are up, Citi Bike usage shot up in May, and Staten Island remains the only borough without any bike-share program. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Video: Relax with a tour through the blooming roses at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Who should have the power in the process of approving liquor licenses? Should it be the community board, which represents the people of the neighborhood or a business improvement district, which represents local businesses? The Lower West Side Partnership is attempting to muscle its way into the decision making process. (Bowery Boogie)

The scandals at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park are too long to list. Most recently inmate Jamel Floyd died after being pepper-sprayed in the face. New reports are surfacing that inmates are being confined to their cells nearly 24 hours a day and have provided very little response to Covid-19. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

The mayor has the talent to make people hate him. Two different City Councilmembers put forward different resolutions for his removal by Governor Cuomo, one because he did too much to maintain order during George Floyd protests and another because he didn’t do enough to maintain order. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

The MTA’s influence goes far beyond NYC. The MTA’s budget is spent in all but one of the continental US states, meaning the MTA’s finding is also America’s funding. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

I Need More, the boutique owned by the late Jimmy Webb, will be (closing for good at the end of July. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Rents will freeze for roughly 2 million New Yorkers with rent-regulated apartments for the next year to help ease the financial burden of the novel coronavirus pandemic. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Rent Guidelines Board vote, explained. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Photos: Photographer Peter Schafer’s portrait series of New Yorkers in mask. (Howard Halle, photos by Peter Schafer for Time Out)

Meet Elisa Crespo, the trans candidate looking to succeed Richie Torres as a Bronx City Councilmember. Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Ready to start riding a bike? Check out these nine tips from cyclists. (Monica Torres for HuffPost)

It’s been over a year since the death of Layleen Polanco and there still haven’t been any significant reforms around solitary confinement. One of the reasons reforms stalled was Mayor de Blasio’s opposition to them. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

New York State’s 118 billionaires increased their net worth by an estimated $44.9 billion, or 8.6 percent, from March 18 to May 15. More than 100 state legislators won’t approve any spending cuts without raising taxes on the wealthy. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The City Council passed a ban on police chokeholds the mayor said he’ll sign, despite weeks of his arguing for an exception for potentially fatal situations. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Say hello to Abraham Knofler, the city’s latest noted racist. He’s the guy who stood outside of Burly Coffee in Bed-Stuy for at least eleven minutes arguing that their Black Lives Matter sign was somehow offensive. IT’s a miracle that he didn’t get his ass beaten. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Did you know that New York City has a “Rat Row?” Well due to the city’s restaurants being closed, Rat Row has been expanding. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

If you’re looking for a mud-slinging primary, look no further than the 43rd Assembly district contest between incumbent Diana Richardson and former State Senator Jesse Hamilton. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Looking for more nature in your life? Here are 10 Forever Wild nature preserves in the city. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Get ready, because New York City is entering phase two of reopening on Monday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

16 books about New York City by Black authors. (6sqft)

If you’re formulating an escape for Rikers Island, how do you get to freedom? IF you’re the inmate who tried to escape on Thursday, you try to swim across the East River. Sadly, they didn’t make it without being caught. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

It felt like we just rid ourselves of the Islanders, but they may be coming back. The owners of the Nassau Coliseum indefinitely closed the arena, leaving the team with nowhere to play their home games. With no other options, the Isles could come back to Brooklyn until their new home at the Belmont Racetrack is constructed. (JT Torenli for Brooklyn Eagle)

More than 50 New York lawmakers called for Gov. Andrew Cuomo to strengthen his eviction ban extension, which ends on Monday. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The Naval Cemetery Landscape is once again open to the public for those that want a moment of respite and also one surrounded by buried bodies. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Association of Jewish Camp Operators is suing Governor Andrew Cuomo over his closure of sleepaway camps this summer, arguing the order violates their constitutional rights of the free exercise of religion. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

If the idea of spending the summer with your kids is daunting (or terrifying), the Times has some idea of how to entertain your kids. (Alexis Soloski for NY Times)

City Councilmember Donovan Richards is calling for the removal of NYPD officers from school security duties. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

The NYPD has vacated Carl Schurz Park after blocking access for no good reason. (Steven Vago for Streetsblog)

The City Council passed the POST Act, which will require the NYPD to reveal information about their arsenal of surveillance tools, which include stingray devices, drones, facial recognition, and more. The mayor is expected to sign the bill into law. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

45 ice cream shops open for summer 2020. (Regan Miles for amNewYork Metro)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 23, 2020 – The “No One Cares Why You’re Leaving New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The City Council pushes forward with its open streets plan, an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights,” standout sushi takeout and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 53˚
Light rain overnight.

Despite the Governor’s orders, some hospitals are not allowing one support person in labor and delivery settings. (Virginia Breen for The City)

7 things you didn’t know about Central Park. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A look at the positive contributions of David Penepent, a mortuary sciences professor at SUNY Canton, who is helping with the transportation, care, and cremation of New York City’s dead during this pandemic. Very often you’ll hear about how bad of a job someone is doing in a moment of crisis, this is the exact opposite. (Alexandra E. Petri for NY Times)

15% of pregnant women in NYC tested positive for COVID-19 in a limited study in Manhattan over a two week period. The findings may give a better look into what’s happening with the general population and highlights a need for universal testing. (Bobby Cuza for NY1)

No cares about your “why I’m leaving New York” essay. That goes double during a pandemic. Just leave and take your guilt about leaving with you. (Claire Fallon for HuffPost)

A “plaque” was put up in Park Slope near Methodist Hospital by an unknown guerilla street artist honoring “grocery workers, nurses, hospital staff, doctors, mail carriers, immigrant laborers, and other true heroes” of the pandemic. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The City Council is looking for ways to resuscitate the city’s summer jobs program. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson pushed a 75-mile open street plan forward on Wednesday. Johnson and Council Member Carlina Rivera dismissed the mayor’s concerns about the plan as irrelevant. The mayor has recently blamed the failure of his open streets plan on New Yorkers. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The City Council introduced an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights” on Wednesday, which would require large employers to provide additional protections and hazard pay to those hourly workers helping the city continue to operate during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Christopher Robbins and Sydney Perreira for Gothamist)

Looking to make your Friday night Zoom hangout feel a little more regular? Check out Virtual Cheers, which in return for a donation to the staff of the bar will give you a photo of the bar of your choice. (Beth Landman for Eater)

The organizers of the city’s Pride parades have decided to collaborate to take their events virtual. Global PRide is June 27, but the city has already canceled all public events in June. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

What’s the first thing you’re gonna eat when quarantine is over? 21 famous New Yorkers on the first thing they’re gonna eat. (Alyssa Shelasky for Grub Street)

The mayor has continued to talk publicly about what it will take to reopen the city, including a “Trace and Test” program, which will move people who test positive into isolation, possibly in one of the 11,000 hotel rooms the city has set aside. Right now the city is aiming for 400,000 test kits per month, which isn’t nearly enough for the city’s 8.5 million people. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mayor Bloomberg volunteered to develop a contact tracing program for the tri-state area. Bloomberg Philanthropies has also made a financial contribution of $10.5 million through the Bloomberg School fo Health at John’s Hopkins. This is separate from the Mayor de Blasio’s plan. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Governor Cuomo is looking to double the number of COVID-19 tests in the state, from 20,000 to 40,000. The 40,000 is “ambitious,” in his own words, with the state’s 300 labs working 24/7 to meet the demand for 20,000. At 40,000 a day, it’ll only take 13 and a half years to test the whole state. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

Foot Locker, H&M, Old Navy, Nordstrom, Party City, and The Gap, welcome to the non-rent paying party. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The underground, hydroponic farm on Worth St, Farm.One, is still operating, but its produce was originally intended for bars and restaurants. Now they are opening up orders to the public. (Tribeca Citizen)

This is a celebration that has to happen.” -Mayor de Blasio on the Fourth of July fireworks. Fourth of July is six days after NYC Pride was scheduled to end. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Bodega-inspired streetwear. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The MTA’s 250 construction projects are moving forward, albeit with some new safety precautions, being deemed essential. With so few people riding the trains, this may be the optimal time to get that work done.(Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Everyone’s made a mistake when ordering groceries, especially now, but what do you do with ten bunches of bananas or 1,200 coffee filters? (Madison Malone Kircher for Grub Street)

Where to get Mexican takeout and delivery in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

50 things the RESY staff misses most about New York. (RESY)

An interactive map of where to avoid where sidewalks make social distancing impossible. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Now remains a great time to adopt a dog or a cat. The Briefly home has two amazing toy poodles, Scooter and Pepper, and we couldn’t be happier. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

It’s like “ballet or break dancing on a bike.” Meet BMX champ Matthias Dandois, who is doing tricks inside his Tribeca apartment. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

Here is the recipe for Junior’s famous cheesecake from scratch. Now I know what I’m doing to try (and fail) this weekend. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Two NY housecats have tested positive for COVID-19, as well as four tigers and three lions in the Bronx Zoo. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Meet Jennifer Marino-Bonventre, an English teacher who is bringing some joy to the city with some fantastic sidewalk chalk drawings. (Debora Fougere for NY1)

The Times found out what the rest of us already knew: New Yorkers want cheap wine and a lot of cheap wine. (Alix Strauss for NY Times)

New York City, a city of winners, and Boston, which is a different city, have different sports teams, different coffee choices, different clam chowders, and two genetically different types of pigeons. (Joshua Sokol for NY Times)

22 standout sushi spots still open for takeout and delivery. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Eater)

Thanks to reader Melissa for today’s featured photo from the East Village.

The Briefly for April 14, 2020 – The “Fell Between Train Cars and Survived” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: How a tiger got a COVID-19 test, the best cheese delivery, a plan to get the economy moving, sex work in the time of social distancing, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 56˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

Emergency food providers in New York City will receive $25 million in emergency funding to help them deal with the many challenges of the coronavirus pandemic and continue providing food to those in need, paying for 19 million meals. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

An interview with NYC Food Czar Kathryn Garcia is scouring the city for essential food workers, getting meals to the most vulnerable, and keeping the supply chains visible. (Lela Nargi for Civil Eats)

Photos: 13 amazing looks from this year’s online Easter Bonnet Parade. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

It’s a literal miracle. A blind man fell between two F train cars on Easter and survived. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

One of my favorite video tours of NYC: Richard Splett (Veep), NYC savvy insider, shows the best the city has to offer. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A peek into the world of sex work in the city while social distancing. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

Everyone’s adjusting, coffee shops included. Here are the city’s top coffee shops that pivoted to delivering fresh-roasted beans. (Liz Clayton for Eater)

Take a look at the city’s shuttered hospitals over the last 20 years and you’ll find that half of them have been replaced by residential buildings. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Dive into Bill Cuningham’s photo archive to create a new Easter Parade picked from history. (Vanessa Friedman for NY Times)

If you’re uninsured and want to enroll in healthcare through the state, the deadline was extended until May 15. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Happy Birthday? Here’s where to get takeout and delivery for your birthday. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

So, why was a tiger able to get a COVID-19 test? (Alyse Stanley for Gizmodo)

Videos: NYC’s empty streets. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Lost in the Cuomo vs de Blasio fight over keeping the schools closed through the end of the school year is de Blasio saying that there’s no guarantee that schools will be open even in September. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Is this your asshole cat in the East Village? (EV Grieve)

The best cheese delivery in NYC. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

We’re ordering less delivery than before the pandemic hit, according to Grub Hub. Maybe everyone realized they can use Grub Hub for a menu and are calling restaurants directly? Probably not. (Serena Dai for Eater)

New hospitalizations for COVID-19 fell by 17 percent — with 383 people admitted to hospitals on Saturday, down from 463 on Friday. Finally, a good sign. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Governor Cuomo is working with five neighboring states to chart a path to get the economy moving again. The six states, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island are working together to unite as states of America, which is an interesting concept. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

A Broadway fund-raiser to benefit entertainment workers whose livelihoods have been imperiled by the coronavirus will be rescheduled after a labor union retreated from a demand that musicians be paid for the streaming of the previously recorded event. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The city’s daily release of COVID-19 information has improved in quality, but still does not account for suspected cases of COVID-19-related deaths in the home. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Inside Enoteca Maria, where the kitchen crew is all grandmas. (Reina Gattuso for Atlas Obscura)

The combination of a rainbow and the 7pm cheer is pretty hard to beat. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The NYC Italian delivery guide. Unfortunately, there are as many places in Queens on this map as there are in New Jersey, so this is mostly Manhattan and South Brooklyn. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)