The Briefly for September 10, 2019 – The “A Horrifying Nightmare Trip on Columbus Ave” Edition

The tribute in lights is killing birds, $90k of stolen cake, a guide to apple picking, more details about the Charging Bull banjo attack, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

San Gennaro kicks off on Thursday, and amNY has a guide for what you need to know and what you need to eat. (amNY)

The May Room, an art installation from Shantell Martin, has taken over Our Lady Star of the Sea, the military chapel on Governors Island, through October 27. This is the first time the chapel is open to the public in twenty years. (Untapped Cities)

While the amusement area in Coney Island is larger than ever, its neighborhood storefronts are struggling with the third highest vacancy rate in Brooklyn and sixth in the city. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

There’s a jimsonweed bush growing on the Columbus Ave greenway at the corner of 93rd St. It’s an odd pick to be planted there, as jimsonweed is highly toxic when consumed. That’s not all. The plant can be made into a powerful drug that is easy to overdose on and if you survive you’re almost guaranteed a horrifying nightmare of a hallucinogenic trip that turns its victims into “zombies devoid of free will.” Avoid the plant. (Gothamist)

Is there nothing New York won’t add alcohol to? Taco Bell, ice cream, and now bubble tea. Bubbleology opens on the 16th in the East Village (Time Out)

A guide to picking apples near the city. (Patch)

This is such a bummer I’m surprised it didn’t come from Neil deGrasse Tyson. The Tribute in Lights, which takes place for a few days every year around the anniversary of 9/11, is killing thousands and thousands of birds. It seems that birds get confused by the light during their migration periods, essentially trapping them and preventing them from having the energy to finish their trip south. Since 2006, the tribute has ruined over a million birds’ flight patterns. (Splinter)

Think about cake. Now think about a lot of cake. Now think about $90,000 of cake. That’s how much cake a deliveryman stole from Lady M in Long Island City. (LIC Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer endorsed Elizabeth Warren for president. He joins City Councilmembers Brad Lander and Antonio Reynoso with his endorsement. Do you think it’ll get awkward when de Blasio finally fails out of the race and comes back to do his job in the city? (Patch)

Restoration on the World’s Fair Observation Towers in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will begin next month. If you’ve ever been curious what’s at the top of the towers, there are some photos. (Untapped Cities)

We’re no Hawaii, but New York state is the 15th “happiest” state in the country. At least we’re not West Virginia, right? (Patch)

Good news for the asphalt area in Tompkins Square Park, which is known as the epicenter of NYC skateboard culture. The city had originally planned to turn over the area while East River Park gets rebuilt to prevent rising sea levels from destroying Manhattan, but the Parks Department has changed its plans after an outcry from the community and a rally promoted by City Councilmember Carlina Rivera. (Gothamist)

Is NYCHA ready for the next Superstorm Sandy? After the 2012 storm, nearly 80,000 residents were without electricity for weeks. Seven years later, Comptroller Scott Stringer is questioning the de Blasio administration’s preparedness. (Curbed)

More details are starting to emerge about this weekend’s banjo-wielding attack by Tevon Varlack from Dallas on the Charging Bull statue. Repairing the statue will cost around $100,000. (Gothamist)

FlyNYON is already under federal scrutiny for its fatal 2018 East River crash which left five people dead. Now it’s attracting even more negative attention for its recent promotion offering dogs a spot in its doors-off helicopter rides around lower Manhattan. (Patch)

Here are the street closures for the 9/11 ceremonies this year. (amNY)

Photos from the Coney Island Beard and Moustache Competition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re yearning for the days of Mayor Bloomberg welcoming people into his administration with a handshake, an expectation of hard work, and a quiet “don’t fuck this up,” “The Many Lives of Michael Bloomberg” may be the book for you. (Politico)

The “where are people going out right now” guide. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for September 9, 2019 – The “Attacked by a Metal Banjo” Edition

New York’s new license plates have been chosen, a new tomato plant grows on the East River, the Port Authority’s new bus depot comes up short, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This week’s late-night subway service change lottery losers are the 3, 4, 6, A, F, N, and Q trains. And always the L train. (Subway Weekender)

This is our new license plate. (Patch)

For the people who loved the tomato plant discovered along the East River, here’s some good news: there is another. (NY Times)

The Charging Bull was attacked with a metal banjo. (NY Times)

It’s a nasty cycle. Bus service degrades to a point where walking will get you where you need to be faster. As a result of the poor service, ridership declines. The MTA doesn’t see the cause, just the effect, and along routes like the B38 and B54, they cut service to match the lowered demand. Now with the degraded service, the buses are still slow, still unreliable and now there are less of them. The MTA can’t fix the problems with the buses because that’s the Department of Transportation’s street designs and the NYPD’s lack of enforcement of what can make traffic flow easily and keep the streets safe for vehicles pedestrians and cyclists. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Friends (The worst show to celebrate in the age of Trump) experience pop-up on Mercer Street is all sold out, so some photos of the inside are all you’ll get unless more tickets become available. (Gothamist)

Bill de Blasio’s campaign for president hopefully ends on October 1st and someone should throw a party in celebration, especially if it means the mayor will stop doing things like show up on Tucker Carlson’s show looking for anyone who will support him. (Gothamist)

277 people leave New York for good every day, making it the #1 city people want to leave in the country. (Bloomberg)

Here comes fall, which means here comes food festivals. (6sqft)

The Apple cube is back on 5th Ave, and it’s trippy as hell. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority presented some of its ideas to replace the Port Authority Bus Terminal, and none of them accommodated services like Megabus, which use the sidewalks of midtown for their pickups and dropoffs, into their plans. There was worry that the Port Authority would eventually screw up replacing the bus terminal, and they are already meeting expectations. (Gothamist)

Digging in on bad ideas is now a hallmark of the mayor’s public statements. (Streetsblog)

Here are this week’s restaurants shut down by the Department of Health, including Tasty Popcorn Chicken in Queens with a whopping 121 violation points. (Patch)

New Yorkers already received over 1.25 billion robocalls this year. (Patch)

The 5 Boro Pizza Challenge is an attempt to eat a slice of pizza in every borough in one day, only using public transportation. Think you have what it takes? (6sqft)

Take a look inside Bette Midler’s $50 million penthouse, which is for sale. (Curbed)

New York will soon get more Detroit-style pizza when Michigan chain Jet’s Pizza sets up its first outpost on Ninth Ave between 17th and 18th St. (Eater)

Last Thursday set the record for the most Citi Bike rides in a day with 90,000. (Streetsblog)

The historic boardwalk in Coney Island is landmarked, but still bears scars from Superstorm Sandy. If you walk west on the boardwalk, past the amusement zone, you’ll encounter a section of plywood boards that freeze over in the winter. You’ll see nails sticking up, you’ll see missing boards, plants growing through, and other hazards. Residents are sick of it and are demanding change. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The governor is flirting with the idea of holding the 2020 New York presidential primaries to February, one day after the Iowa caucuses. (NY Times)

Texting while crossing the street is safe, according to a new study by the Department of Transportation. Remember this the next time some old fuddy-duddy tries to argue otherwise. (NY Times)

Joe Namath is selling his (empty) $1.19 Upper West Side duplex. (I Love the Upper West Side)

There are more hate crimes against black people in NYC this year, but there were more arrests in cases with hate crimes against white people, according to numbers released by the NYPD. (Patch)

A look at five new restaurants in the city. (amNY)

A Times Square Elmo was arrested for groping a teenage girl. (Pix 11)

The history of Central Park’s Shakespeare Garden. (Ephemeral New York)

15 places to try when the company is picking up the tab for lunch. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 6, 2019 – The “NYC Rodent Murder Sludge Bucket” Edition

A drag queen runs for City Council, ConEd gets yelled at, city beaches are prematurely closed, don’t trust the free subway wifi, and more in today’s daily NYC news update

This weekend’s subway service changes and disruptions are few in number, but the trains that are hit, are hit hard. Expect problems getting around on the 2, 6, J, N, R and SIR. (Subway Weekender)

Someone set up a makeshift stage for the mayor to drop out of the presidential race outside of the Park Slope YMCA. It’s not a bad strategy to get the mayor’s attention, he spends more time at the YMCA than he does at City Hall. (Brooklyn Paper)

Meet Deborah Lauter, the head of the city’s new Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes. (NY Times)

Is the city ready for its first drag queen on city council? Marti Gould Allen-Cummings thinks so and plans to run in Manhattan District 7. (amNY)

A death box full of sludge and dead rats. Welcome to Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s new “hygienic, humane, and sustainable” mass-murder bucket. (Splinter)

Eric Garner’s family still has a lot of unanswered questions about his death, including why he was charged with a felony cigarette sale charge when it requires 10,000 cigarettes or more to be applicable or why the police report said no force was used. Pantaleo is fired, but the family is pushing forward to seek broader justice. (The Indypendent)

The guitarist of the band Piss Factory settles into his new role: the heir to a tofu dynasty. (NY Times)

Yeah, you love karaoke, but do you love it enough to run a karaoke den out of your home? (Bedford + Bowery)

A look at why subway tile is so classic and how it’s evolving. (StreetEasy)

Do you know about the Pratt Cats and the history behind the cat houses on campus? (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after a run in Central Park (but also after you take a shower, right?) (The Infatuation)

Neopolitan, St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit Sicilian, and more. Where to find regional pizza styles in the city. (amNY)

City beaches are closed Friday and Saturday because of Hurricane Dorian-related conditions, ruining two of the three last days of beach season. Bummer. (Patch)

If you’re already missing summer, this split-screen video showing 100 years of history in Coney Island will have you feeling the sand in your shoes. (The New Yorker)

Photos from inside the 6,000-square-foot Artechouse, the space under Chelsea Market dedicated to new media artwork. (Untapped Cities)

29 fall restaurants openings you need to know about. (Grub Street)

He’s already got ethics charges against him, what’s a few more? The City Council Standards and Ethics Committee found evidence of conflict-of-interest violations and retaliation against staff members by Andy King, a council member from the Bronx. A closed-door hearing will be held September 13 for all charges. (Patch)

2019 has already seen more than twice the number of cyclists killed by drivers as in 2018. Mayor de Blasio’s natural instinct is to consider introducing new regulations for cyclists, not drivers. (Curbed)

Are you someone who finds satisfaction in watching something get clean? Watch the Museum of Natural History clean its 92-foot, 21,000-pound white whale and relax. (American Museum of Natural History)

ConEd sent people to get yelled at by City Council over this summer’s power outages. (Gothamist)

How to spend a day in Bushwick. (amNY)

Norm’s Pizza, a new pizza shop in Downtown Brooklyn, is the unholy marriage of the owners of dollar-slice 2 Bros. and the former Roberta’s pizzaiolo turned pizza consultant Anthony Falco. (Eater)

Must-see theater coming to the city’s stages this fall. (amNY)

Photos: ‘Meet Me in the Bathroom: The Art Show’ (Brooklyn Vegan)

At least four former city council members are considering running for their old seats after they were term-limited out. (Politico)

All the ways your information can be stolen while using the free wifi in a subway station. (amNY)

The hottest brunch spots in NYC. (Eater)

Thanks to reader Louisa for today’s featured photo.