The Briefly for June 23, 2020 – The “Are These NYC’s Bad Old Days?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s primary day in NYC, a look at the rules of outdoor dining in phase two, surprising chickens in a drug bust, the NY Post’s “copaganda,” and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 82˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

Here’s how to vote in today’s primary. (BKLYNER)

Today is the primary across the city, but don’t expect results so quickly this time around. Absentee ballots aren’t counted until eight days past the election. We could be waiting a while. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, let me introduce you to the stacked highways all across Manhattan idea from the 1930s. (Joshua Mu for Viewing NYC)

After a spike in gun violence over the weekend, the mayor said the city isn’t going back to the bad old days where there was “so much violence in this city,” but also “Nor are we going back to the bad old days where policing was done the wrong way.” According to that statement, we are currently living in “the bad old days.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

With phase two, the city’s playgrounds have reopened. They are literally no safer than they used to be, so don’t expect sanitization or regular cleanings. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

The city formally announced that phase two would start on Monday on Thursday, giving restaurants four days to prepare and comply with a new set of regulations for outdoor dining. (Gary He for Eater)

What to expect from phase two of NYC’s reopening. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Here are the guidelines for reopened restaurants as a part of phase two. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

More than 3,000 restaurants have signed up to set up outdoor dining as the city enters the second phase of its reopening. The restaurants approved will be allowed to set up tables and chairs in parking spaces and sidewalks. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state moratorium on evictions ended over the weekend. There are advocacy groups that are estimating 50,000 – 60,000 cases could be filed in the next few days. This is the first wave of expected cases, another protection for people who were directly affected by Covid-19 expires in August. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hundreds of people gathered in protest to demand the eviction ban continues until the state has recovered from the Covid-19 crisis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An investigation is ongoing after a man fell onto the tracks and was hit and killed by the 7 train on Sunday night. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

“Back in my day, if you wanted to go to a Target, you had to go to Brooklyn, the Bronx, or New Jersey” is what very lame grandparents will tell their grandkids. Target announced it is opening stores on the Upper East and West Sides. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Facebook is eyeing expanding its footprint in the Hudson Yards, taking over the space that will be left vacant by Neiman Marcus’s bankruptcy. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos and Video: 10,000+ riders took part in the Street Riders’ Black Lives Matter Ride through Manhattan. Fun fact, more people showed up for the ride than turned out for Trump’s Tulsa rally. (Amanda Hatfield, photos by Toby Tenenbaum for BrooklynVegan)

Heads up: The produce at this week’s farmers markets should be fantastic. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to a loophole about how the NYPD’s cars are funded, the two lawyers that are accused of tossing Molotov cocktails into empty police cars may be facing life in prison. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A look at the NY Post’s recent history of running “copaganda” articles that share police narratives with anonymous sourcing, zero additional verification, and in contradiction of facts. (Kay Dervishi for City and State)

The NYPD are known liars. Despite their crying in public about being “poisoned” by Shake Shack employees, a thorough review shows that the officers involved never displayed any symptoms of illness and the Shake Shack employees couldn’t have known that the order was for NYPD officers because the order was placed online. Despite this, police unions sent out information that the officers had started throwing up and invented a narrative of Antifa employees inside Shake Shack. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea testified in defense of the police’s actions against protesters during the first week of June without providing details and dodging every possible question that involved specifics and dismissed a delivery person’s arrest as a “false report.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Look around the city and you’ll see iconic statues wearing face masks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What is usually the best party in the city every year, the Mermaid Parade, is going to be virtual and take place on August 29. (Amanda Hatfield for Brooklyn Vegan)

The Inwood rezoning lawsuit, which was ruled that the de Blasio administration failed to account for the potential change in the racial makeup of the neighborhood, could forever change how the city plans neighborhoods towards something more equitable. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Members of Sure We Can, the city’s only nonprofit redemption center, is requesting $2.3 million from the city’s budget, saying they will have to close their Bushwick location that it has occupied for ten years without it, where hundreds of canners gather each morning to sort and redeem their bottles and cans.  (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The surprising part of this drug bust was unrelated to the drugs, it was the chickens. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man who tried to escape Rikers Island on Thursday made another attempt to escape on Sunday. According to inmates at Rikers, the measures taken to combat Covid-19 have made Rikers intolerable. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Okay, phase two is in effect, but let’s look at what phase three could mean for the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

28 restaurants open for outdoor dining this week. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 16, 2020 – The “4th of July Every Single Night” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD disbands a plainclothes unit, Soho’s street art, the mayor’s sick day, Governor Cuomo is ready to shut NYC down again, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 75˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Today’s the last day for you to apply for an absentee ballot.

A voter’s guide to some of the most hotly contested races on the NY ballot. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

What you need to know for the June 23 primary elections. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

What the hell is going on with all the fireworks lately? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Attorney General Letitia James is going to hold an online public hearing on Wednesday to investigate the NYPD’s actions during the protests that followed the murder of George Floyd. (Jacob Kaye for amNewYork Metro)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea has promised “greater transparency,” but it’s hard not to think of that as a joke when he announces that an officer was suspended without pay for spraying mace at a group of people during a protest in Manhattan on June 1. Which officer? No information. Which incident specifically? No information. Very transparent. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The NYPD is disbanding a unit of 600 plainclothes cops in precinct-level and Housing Bureau anti-crime teams. The NYPD will still have plainclothes cops in the Surveillance and Narcotics bureaus. Despite the announcement coming with the statement that it has “no reflection” on their work, the disbanded group represented 2% of the NYPD, but 31% of its fatal shootings. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Make NYPD discipline records public you cowards. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

“Systemic racism is something that is learned. It’s learned over generations. We need to look at the narrative as it has been taught and revise it. And I feel that people are now starting to listen because it’s not just a black problem. If one part of your population is not good, it’s going to call to question what is it to be an American citizen? What is that? What is the real perk in that?” An interview with Detective Felicia Richards, president of the NYPD Guardians Association, a fraternal organization for black police officers. (Jami Floyd and Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

The state’s court system will undergo an independent review of its practices regarding institutional racism. The review will be overseen by a former U.S. secretary of Homeland Security and a general counsel for the Obama Administration’s Department of Defense. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Photos: Soho street art. (Josh Vogel for NYC Urbanism)

While the plans for the city’s 2020-2021 school year haven’t been publicly announced (I’ve heard it’s a limit of 10 people per classroom), there’s still a matter of what teachers will be healthy enough to return to the classrooms. According to the Department of Education estimates, up to 20% of teachers could be working remotely due to health concerns. (Reema Amin for ChalkBeat)

Short experiences from across the city from people who discovered their neighbors and neighborhoods during quarantine. (NY Times)

Where was the mayor on Monday? He was sick and at home. In his own words, “All New Yorkers should get a Covid-19 diagnostic test, whether or not they have symptoms or at increased risk.” Did he get a test? Of course now, and he has no plans to get one in the future. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Don’t make Cuomo turn this reopening around. There were over 25,000 reopening violation complaints to the state and it seems that Governor Cuomo is losing patience with Mayor de Blasio’s inability to enforce the rules, stating plainly “enforce the law or there will be state action.” (Erik Enquist for The Real Deal)

Raise your hand if you’re surprised that the MTA’s homeless outreach program was not a success. No one? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

12 restaurants that are selling frozen Chinese dumplings for home cooking. (Tony Lin for Eater)

Since 2013, there have been more than 25 million applications submitted for roughly 40,000 units in the city’s housing lottery. This week the city rolled out a new system for the lottery. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Airbnb is settling a lawsuit with the city by handing over data about hosts. It won’t be retroactive, but it will start once a new city ordinance is passed. The hope is to weed out illegal short-term rentals. (Christine Fisher for Engadget)

Monday’s LGBTQ SCOTUS decision has its roots in Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for GVSHP)

33 places to celebrate Black history in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Over 10,000 people took to the streets of Brooklyn on Sunday for “Brooklyn Liberation: An Action for Black Trans Lives.” The march came together after Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells and Riah Milton were killed within 24 hours of each other. Justice was also called for in the names of Tony McHale, Layleen Polanco, and Nina Pop. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

The photos from the Black Liberation rally are truly impressive. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Photos: Coney Island’s George Floyd protest. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The NYPD found no criminality after officers became sick Monday night from shakes they got at a Shake Shack in downtown Manhattan. I think the NYPD should have allowed Shake Shack to do their own investigation. (CBS News)

Tired of your traditional summer reading lists? Here’s a list of Nick Cave’s favorite books. (Erin Christie for BrooklynVegan)

A 14-year-old who pleaded guilty to robbing Tessa Majors in Morningside Park was sentenced in Manhattan Family Court on Monday to 18 months in a juvenile facility. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The NYC sandwich delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for June 10, 2020 – The “An Actual Piece of Good News for NYC” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The future of NYC restaurants, the repeal of 50a, each borough gets a Black Lives Matter street, support for disbanding the NYPD, restaurant guide, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 80˚
Rain overnight.

Mayor de Blasio announced that while the city may seem ready for a June 22 phase two reopening, we shouldn’t expect phase two to begin before July. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Sunday was a new low for the city in a good way. Only 1% of people tested for Covid-19 tested positive. Hospital admittances were at 52 on Sunday, far from the peak at 850. Transmission is still high, with hundreds of new cases every day. This good news isn’t a reason to stop being careful, it’s signs that what we are doing is working. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is supporting the idea of disbanding the NYPD, looking to follow Minneapolis’s lead. Police Benevolent Association President Pat Lynch is against the idea, but let’s be clear about this, he doesn’t get to have a seat at the table or a voice in this discussion. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The State Senate voted to repeal 50a. Governor Cuomo has vowed to sign the legislation. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

City courts are scheduled to reopen starting today since their closure in March, with precautions. Outside of emergencies, most matters will still be handled virtually. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Here are the rules for outdoor dining, which is allowed starting with phase two, slated for June 22. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

That hasn’t stopped restaurants from putting out tables and chairs for customers, which are inevitably used for dining. The most blatant is the White Horse Tavern, which announced it was open for business on Instagram and has been encouraging customers to use the tables and chairs for dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The state has released its rules for indoor dining, as portions of the state are already looking at phase three. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

If tables aren’t placed more than six feet apart, restaurants may have to construct five-foot barriers, ie. cubicles, between the tables with a maximum of 10 people per table. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deeper look at six critical points for restaurants before reopening. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The Alibi Lounge, one of the city’s only Black-owned LGBTQ bars is in danger of closing. There is a GoFundMe, which is at $11,000 of its $50,000 goal. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

When will you be ready to go back to concerts, fly in an airplane, or attend a dinner party? The Times asked 511 epidemiologists and the short version is that it could be a year or more before things come close to returning to normal. (Margot Sanger-Katz, Claire Cain Miller and Quoctrung Bui for NY Times)

Today’s hero is former Mayor de Blasio Senior Adviser Alison Hirsh, who resigned after the mayor’s near-unconditional defense of the NYPD and will begin as an adviser to Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza in the Department of Education. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Now that the City Council and state legislature have rendered his opinion unnecessary for public debate, the mayor is in support of banning chokeholds and possible NYPD funding cuts. Always ready to take a stand one second after it doesn’t matter. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

“But right now we’re asking him to speak up, we’re asking him to stand behind his campaign, we’re asking him to stand behind his mission of equity, we’re asking him to just support us. He isn’t listening to us.” Why did Mayor de Blasio’s staffers protest him on Monday? (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Photos: Just because curfew is over does not mean the protests in support of Black Lives Matter have stopped. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Portraits: Why we are protesting. (Hiram Alejandro Durán for The City)

Officer Vincent D’Andraia was charged with assault for shoving a woman protesting to the ground. He’ll be charged with misdemeanor assault for the incident. The victim of his assault hit her head on the ground and sustained a concussion and seizure after the attack. (John Del Signore and JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Video: Wrapping up the NYPD union’s garbage rhetoric in one minute and nine seconds. (@bubbaprog)

One street in each of the five boroughs will be painted to send a message to New York City: Black Lives Matter, mirroring Washington DC’s tactics. The streets were not specified when the announcement was made. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Recent reports have been raising concerns that the NYPD’s Intelligence Division, along with the FBI, have been questioning protesters arrested on curfew violations about their political sympathies and affiliations, along with their social media behavior. This would violate a 35-year-old consent decree meant to keep the police from investigation protected political speech. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A guide to New York City’s sculpture parks. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Sometimes you need to turn your mind off and look at a list of banal things. Here are 11 celebrities spending their quarantine in NYC. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

So you’ve optimized your bedroom and workspace while suffering through the quarantine for Covid-19, it’s time to turn your attention to some creative entryway ideas. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 1, representing Greenpoint and Williamsburg, bought itself an SUV with public funds last year, which wasn’t the most popular decision. It was scheduled to hold executive committee elections this month, but the board has introduced a measure to suspend this year’s elections. Nothing like an old-fashioned power grab in the middle of a crisis. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

Say farewell to whatever the hell “Rhode Island-style” pizza was supposed to be. After a year in the East Village, Violet is closing its doors. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A Bronx Democrat City Councilmember who has publicly said may vote for Trump, has made openly homophobic statements, and opposes abortion. Meet Rubén Díaz Sr., who wants to represent the Bronx in Congress. (Shane Goldmacher for NY Times)

“The winner in the 15th Congressional District will face untold numbers of issues in office next year. The candidate we believe will most closely align himself with the values and goals we hold dear is Ritchie Torres. And we know only too well that the election of Ruben Diaz, Sr., would be a tragic step backwards for the cause of equality and inclusion in American society.
-Paul Schindler for Gay City News, Progressives Must Unite Around Ritchie Torres in the Bronx

Photos: Congrats to the winners of Coney Island USA’s “Maskies” face mask competition. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Apartment Porn: An $2 million Hamilton Heights apartment with a roof deck as big as the apartment. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Harlem’s Schomburg Center released the Black Liberation Reading List, a list of 95 books that foster a greater understanding of Black history and culture. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

NYC restaurant reopening guide. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Thank you to reader Laura for today’s featured photo!