The Briefly for August 28, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining, I Don’t Know Her” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A look at the state of bars and restaurants vs the SLA, where we stand with the start of NYC’s school year, great spots buffalo wings, & more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 86˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 65˚ High: 80˚

Try not to roll your eyes, but here’s the big “New York is dead. Here’s why” link. Try to prevent your eyes from rolling all the way out of your head when reading this dipshit’s thinly veiled “Why I’m Leaving New York” essay. (James Altucher)

“Listening to him go, “I used to play chess all day. I could meet people. I could start any type of business.” Wipe your tears, wipe your butt and pull it together. He says he knows people who have left New York for Maine, Vermont, Tennessee, Indiana. I have been to all of these places many, many, many times over many decades. And with all due respect and affection, Are .. You .. Kidding .. Me?!”
-Jerry Seinfeld, So You Think New York Is ‘Dead’ for NY Times

The city’s school will have the option to hold classes outdoors in yards, nearby streets, or parks. PTAs will be responsible for fundraising for supplies and equipment for schools to hold classes outdoors. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

“Chinatown is very traditional, almost to a fault, where we’ve let our elders take over. And we need to learn from our elders, but young people need to be making decisions now, and move Chinatown further. And seeing people like Patrick Mock start standing up and speaking out on the injustices we’ve suffered, it gives us a hope for the future.” -Conversations with politicians, business owners, and locals about the future of Chinatown. (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James asked a judge to order Eric Trump to testify in the state’s inquiry into possible fraud committed by the Trump Organization and President Trump. (William K. Rashbaum and Danny Hakim for NY Times)

NYPD officer Kyle Erickson has been twice accused of planting marijuana during traffic stops on Staten Island and despite bodycam footage to prove he did it, he was cleared of any wrongdoing. Just a sample of the 4,000 pages of documents released by the Staten Island District Attorney’s office about NYPD officers’ dishonesty and (lack) of discipline. (George Joseph and Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Restaurants have been closing, but not failing. An argument for why the distinction matters. (Talia Saxe for Eater)

A series of bars and restaurants sued the SLA this week to roll back their recent rule change that barred live music ticketed events, and other forms of outdoor entertainment. Disclosure: The lawsuit includes Littlefield, where I was hosting trivia all summer on Wednesdays. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

More than 20 state senators are calling on the State Liquor Authority to ease up on their restaurant and bar crackdown. Since mid-June, the SLA conducted over 41,000 checks, 165 businesses lost their liquor licenses temporarily, and 886 were charged with violations. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The City Council voted to extend the 20% commission cap on delivery fees for restaurants until 90 days after they are allowed to operate at full capacity with indoor dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

And when will indoor dining return? The mayor says that depends on how our return to schools goes on September 10. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Although he also hinted that 2021 was a possibility for a return to indoor dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

What’s the return to schools look like? A friend of mine who’s a teacher in the city told me they are getting ready to strike, but in the meantime the city has to inspect 1,700 public schools housed in 1,300 buildings by September 1 with plans to release a report on September 4. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Of the city’s 1,700 schools, 1,030 of them had some kind of documented problem with air supply or exhaust components. Chalkbeat compiled the most recent inspection reports publicly available for each school. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

An additional 30,000 students opted out of any in-person classes this year, bringing the total to 337,394 students that will not step inside a school this school year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Reopening day at the New York Aquarium. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

This Saturday is the reimagined Coney Island Mermaid Parade. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

This Sunday is the MTV Video Music Awards that Governor Cuomo announced back in June. MTV built a stage in Greenpoint instead of using the Barclay Center, citing that an outdoor event without an audience would be safer than an indoor one. Performers will be getting an exemption from the state’s 14-day mandatory quarantine. (Greenpointers)

According to the mayor, 20% of the city’s new Cobid-19 patients are linked to travelers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

US and UK authorities are discussing an “air bridge” exemption from quarantine for travel between New York and London. (Payton Potter for Patch)

With a filing for bankruptcy back in May, the future of the John Varvatos shop in the old home of CBGB might be in jeopardy. Which camp are you in when it comes to John Varvatos replacing CBGB? “At least it’s not a Duane Reade” or “Who cares, let it die?” (EV Grieve)

Revel’s electric mopeds relaunched with new safety protocols. Not sure how I feel about sending the company a selfie of me wearing one of their helmets. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Unmown lawns, unemptied garbage cans, and littered playgrounds. Welcome to the city’s parks when the city needs them the most. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

An engagement while canoeing on the Gowanus Canal: Doomed or beautiful? (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Do you know who makes the decision to return the subway back to 24/7 service? No, seriously, no one seems to know. The governor says to ask the MTA Chairman. The MTA Chairman says to ask the health commissioner. Can I declare the subways open 24/7 again? I hereby declare the subways open 24/7! Did it work? (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Photos: King Nyani, the city’s largest bronze gorilla statue, which can hold 2 or 3 people at once. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

Everything you need to know about living in a first-floor apartment. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Front-door boarding of city buses returns on Monday and so do fares on buses. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

The Mets and Marlins walked off the field after a moment of silence for 42 seconds with a Black Lives Matter t-shirt draped over home plate. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The assholes of the week are “The Illmore,” which has reportedly hosting secret indoor parties since June. The Illmore is, of course, in Bushwick. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Second place goes to Beavis and Butthead over here: Crime in NYC is near an all-time low, historically speaking, which is why former mayor Rudy Giuliani and current Police Benevolent Association president Pat Lynch were at the RNC calling crime in NYC a “public safety disaster.” Murders in NYC in 2019 were down about 50% from Rudy Giuliani’s last year in office. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Six great buffalo wings in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Helena for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for June 23, 2020 – The “Are These NYC’s Bad Old Days?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s primary day in NYC, a look at the rules of outdoor dining in phase two, surprising chickens in a drug bust, the NY Post’s “copaganda,” and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 82˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

Here’s how to vote in today’s primary. (BKLYNER)

Today is the primary across the city, but don’t expect results so quickly this time around. Absentee ballots aren’t counted until eight days past the election. We could be waiting a while. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, let me introduce you to the stacked highways all across Manhattan idea from the 1930s. (Joshua Mu for Viewing NYC)

After a spike in gun violence over the weekend, the mayor said the city isn’t going back to the bad old days where there was “so much violence in this city,” but also “Nor are we going back to the bad old days where policing was done the wrong way.” According to that statement, we are currently living in “the bad old days.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

With phase two, the city’s playgrounds have reopened. They are literally no safer than they used to be, so don’t expect sanitization or regular cleanings. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

The city formally announced that phase two would start on Monday on Thursday, giving restaurants four days to prepare and comply with a new set of regulations for outdoor dining. (Gary He for Eater)

What to expect from phase two of NYC’s reopening. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Here are the guidelines for reopened restaurants as a part of phase two. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

More than 3,000 restaurants have signed up to set up outdoor dining as the city enters the second phase of its reopening. The restaurants approved will be allowed to set up tables and chairs in parking spaces and sidewalks. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state moratorium on evictions ended over the weekend. There are advocacy groups that are estimating 50,000 – 60,000 cases could be filed in the next few days. This is the first wave of expected cases, another protection for people who were directly affected by Covid-19 expires in August. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hundreds of people gathered in protest to demand the eviction ban continues until the state has recovered from the Covid-19 crisis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An investigation is ongoing after a man fell onto the tracks and was hit and killed by the 7 train on Sunday night. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

“Back in my day, if you wanted to go to a Target, you had to go to Brooklyn, the Bronx, or New Jersey” is what very lame grandparents will tell their grandkids. Target announced it is opening stores on the Upper East and West Sides. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Facebook is eyeing expanding its footprint in the Hudson Yards, taking over the space that will be left vacant by Neiman Marcus’s bankruptcy. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos and Video: 10,000+ riders took part in the Street Riders’ Black Lives Matter Ride through Manhattan. Fun fact, more people showed up for the ride than turned out for Trump’s Tulsa rally. (Amanda Hatfield, photos by Toby Tenenbaum for BrooklynVegan)

Heads up: The produce at this week’s farmers markets should be fantastic. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to a loophole about how the NYPD’s cars are funded, the two lawyers that are accused of tossing Molotov cocktails into empty police cars may be facing life in prison. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A look at the NY Post’s recent history of running “copaganda” articles that share police narratives with anonymous sourcing, zero additional verification, and in contradiction of facts. (Kay Dervishi for City and State)

The NYPD are known liars. Despite their crying in public about being “poisoned” by Shake Shack employees, a thorough review shows that the officers involved never displayed any symptoms of illness and the Shake Shack employees couldn’t have known that the order was for NYPD officers because the order was placed online. Despite this, police unions sent out information that the officers had started throwing up and invented a narrative of Antifa employees inside Shake Shack. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea testified in defense of the police’s actions against protesters during the first week of June without providing details and dodging every possible question that involved specifics and dismissed a delivery person’s arrest as a “false report.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Look around the city and you’ll see iconic statues wearing face masks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What is usually the best party in the city every year, the Mermaid Parade, is going to be virtual and take place on August 29. (Amanda Hatfield for Brooklyn Vegan)

The Inwood rezoning lawsuit, which was ruled that the de Blasio administration failed to account for the potential change in the racial makeup of the neighborhood, could forever change how the city plans neighborhoods towards something more equitable. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Members of Sure We Can, the city’s only nonprofit redemption center, is requesting $2.3 million from the city’s budget, saying they will have to close their Bushwick location that it has occupied for ten years without it, where hundreds of canners gather each morning to sort and redeem their bottles and cans.  (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The surprising part of this drug bust was unrelated to the drugs, it was the chickens. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man who tried to escape Rikers Island on Thursday made another attempt to escape on Sunday. According to inmates at Rikers, the measures taken to combat Covid-19 have made Rikers intolerable. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Okay, phase two is in effect, but let’s look at what phase three could mean for the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

28 restaurants open for outdoor dining this week. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 16, 2020 – The “4th of July Every Single Night” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD disbands a plainclothes unit, Soho’s street art, the mayor’s sick day, Governor Cuomo is ready to shut NYC down again, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 75˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Today’s the last day for you to apply for an absentee ballot.

A voter’s guide to some of the most hotly contested races on the NY ballot. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

What you need to know for the June 23 primary elections. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

What the hell is going on with all the fireworks lately? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Attorney General Letitia James is going to hold an online public hearing on Wednesday to investigate the NYPD’s actions during the protests that followed the murder of George Floyd. (Jacob Kaye for amNewYork Metro)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea has promised “greater transparency,” but it’s hard not to think of that as a joke when he announces that an officer was suspended without pay for spraying mace at a group of people during a protest in Manhattan on June 1. Which officer? No information. Which incident specifically? No information. Very transparent. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The NYPD is disbanding a unit of 600 plainclothes cops in precinct-level and Housing Bureau anti-crime teams. The NYPD will still have plainclothes cops in the Surveillance and Narcotics bureaus. Despite the announcement coming with the statement that it has “no reflection” on their work, the disbanded group represented 2% of the NYPD, but 31% of its fatal shootings. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Make NYPD discipline records public you cowards. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

“Systemic racism is something that is learned. It’s learned over generations. We need to look at the narrative as it has been taught and revise it. And I feel that people are now starting to listen because it’s not just a black problem. If one part of your population is not good, it’s going to call to question what is it to be an American citizen? What is that? What is the real perk in that?” An interview with Detective Felicia Richards, president of the NYPD Guardians Association, a fraternal organization for black police officers. (Jami Floyd and Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

The state’s court system will undergo an independent review of its practices regarding institutional racism. The review will be overseen by a former U.S. secretary of Homeland Security and a general counsel for the Obama Administration’s Department of Defense. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Photos: Soho street art. (Josh Vogel for NYC Urbanism)

While the plans for the city’s 2020-2021 school year haven’t been publicly announced (I’ve heard it’s a limit of 10 people per classroom), there’s still a matter of what teachers will be healthy enough to return to the classrooms. According to the Department of Education estimates, up to 20% of teachers could be working remotely due to health concerns. (Reema Amin for ChalkBeat)

Short experiences from across the city from people who discovered their neighbors and neighborhoods during quarantine. (NY Times)

Where was the mayor on Monday? He was sick and at home. In his own words, “All New Yorkers should get a Covid-19 diagnostic test, whether or not they have symptoms or at increased risk.” Did he get a test? Of course now, and he has no plans to get one in the future. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Don’t make Cuomo turn this reopening around. There were over 25,000 reopening violation complaints to the state and it seems that Governor Cuomo is losing patience with Mayor de Blasio’s inability to enforce the rules, stating plainly “enforce the law or there will be state action.” (Erik Enquist for The Real Deal)

Raise your hand if you’re surprised that the MTA’s homeless outreach program was not a success. No one? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

12 restaurants that are selling frozen Chinese dumplings for home cooking. (Tony Lin for Eater)

Since 2013, there have been more than 25 million applications submitted for roughly 40,000 units in the city’s housing lottery. This week the city rolled out a new system for the lottery. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Airbnb is settling a lawsuit with the city by handing over data about hosts. It won’t be retroactive, but it will start once a new city ordinance is passed. The hope is to weed out illegal short-term rentals. (Christine Fisher for Engadget)

Monday’s LGBTQ SCOTUS decision has its roots in Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for GVSHP)

33 places to celebrate Black history in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Over 10,000 people took to the streets of Brooklyn on Sunday for “Brooklyn Liberation: An Action for Black Trans Lives.” The march came together after Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells and Riah Milton were killed within 24 hours of each other. Justice was also called for in the names of Tony McHale, Layleen Polanco, and Nina Pop. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

The photos from the Black Liberation rally are truly impressive. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Photos: Coney Island’s George Floyd protest. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The NYPD found no criminality after officers became sick Monday night from shakes they got at a Shake Shack in downtown Manhattan. I think the NYPD should have allowed Shake Shack to do their own investigation. (CBS News)

Tired of your traditional summer reading lists? Here’s a list of Nick Cave’s favorite books. (Erin Christie for BrooklynVegan)

A 14-year-old who pleaded guilty to robbing Tessa Majors in Morningside Park was sentenced in Manhattan Family Court on Monday to 18 months in a juvenile facility. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The NYC sandwich delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)