The Briefly for September 21, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Brooklyn Promenade Might Be Closing, and More

BQE construction could shut down the Brooklyn Promenade for years, Battery Park could get a Hurricane Maria memorial, NYC’s only private island, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Before you go anywhere this weekend, check out the changes to the subway. The 2 and M lines look to be especially bad, the L is running, the G is partially running, and the D train is sometimes an A and sometimes an F.

The Brooklyn Promenade could close for six years in order to accommodate construction on the BQE. During construction, the BQE would be elevated to where the promenade currently sits. The promenade would be rebuilt afterwards. The project will cost over $3 billion.

September 22 (Saturday) is Free Museum Day in New York, you can reserve a pair of tickets at one of over two dozen museums throughout the state.

80 Flatbush was unanimously approved by the City Council after undergoing changes to make the project smaller. The next step for the development is seeking Uniform Land Use Review Procedure approval.

One of the city’s top school districts is removing admissions standards in an attempt to diversify the student body. 55% of middle school age students in the district are black or Latino, but 81% of the students in the schools are white. Mayor de Blasio and School Chancellor Richard Carranza approved the plan, which The New York Times points out was not de Blasio’s idea.

Ten elevated parks and gardens across the city from Untapped Cities.

The cost of housing the city’s homeless population has increased. The city is spending $117 a day to house a single adult this year compared to $99 last year. A lack of permanent solutions is being partially blamed for the increase.

The Archdiocese of New York hired Barbara Jones to review its procedures for dealing with the ongoing crisis of clergy sexual-abuse allegations. Jones just finished up the Michael Cohen case two weeks ago. The archdiocese has already paid out $60 million to victims.

If you’ve got a transit nerd in your life the New York Transit Museum’s 25th annual Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park in October.

The Museum of Natural History is starting work on the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation despite a lawsuit by Community United to Save Theodore Roosevelt Park (CUSTR?) aimed at stopping the construction. The lawsuit states the construction would “cause catastrophic environmental damage to the area, posing a series of life threatening hazards.”

Meet the man who owns the only private island in New York City.

Police chief James O’Neill claims that the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights plans to bail out all 16 and 17-year-olds and bail-eligible women from city jails will make the city less safe.

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Citiva, is opening across the street from the Barclays Center.

Governor Cuomo’s former top aide and confidante, Joseph Percoco, will serve six years in prison for bribery.

Fake doctor sentenced for lethal butt injection.

Noted racist James Harris Jackson fatally stabbed a 66-year-old black man with a sword in Midtown last year and told the police it was “practice” for a larger racial terror attack he planned to carry out in Times Square.

What is going on at The Edna Cohen School in Coney Island? More than a week after the primary election there are no votes reported while the State Assembly primary has a 70 vote margin between the candidates.

Governor Cuomo has proposed a memorial to those lost or made homeless by Hurricane Maria in Battery Park City. The governor also announced an expansion of the New York Stands with Puerto Rico program, which sends student volunteers to work with non-profits rebuilding homes on the island.


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The Briefly for Labor Day 2018 – The City Has A New Pot Policy

The NYPD will issue summons instead of arrests in most cases involving smoking pot in public, but critics point out the new policy may continue to allow for racial profiling in arrests made.

There’s a new pot policy in the city, which started September 1. Anyone caught smoking marijuana in public will receive a summons instead of being arrested. There are exceptions to this rule, the most notable being that police can “exercise discretion” on how best to proceed.

The Village Voice has ceased publishing new stories, as reported by the re-animated corpse of Gothamist. The owner, Peter D. Barbey, is going to continue to make the paper’s archives available online. Gothamist suffered a similar fate, but was brought back to life by WNYC.

Less than a month after Inwood’s rezoning, the first 30-story rental tower is planned. The purpose of the rezoning was to encourage 5,000 new apartments in the neighborhood.

The city, working with Legal Aid, is working to get the 6,000 eligible people in Rikers Island registered to vote. The deadline to vote in the general elections on November 6 i October 12.

Another chapter in the long and complicated story of 85 Bowery has come to an end. On Thursday, tenants returned to their renovated homes almost two years after they were vacated from the building due to deteriorating conditions. In 2016, the owner filed a lawsuit to evict (rather than vacate) all tenants of the building, which spurred a legal argument about rent stabilized apartments. The story of the struggle between the tenants and the landlord isn’t over, but tenants once again have their homes.

Despite big promises about Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero, the NYPD has investigated less fatal collisions between pedestrians and cars. Investigations are down 19% and there are two fewer officers in the unit since 2013 (a promise was made to add more).

1,160 kids in NYCHA housing tested positive for lead poisoning since 2012. That number started as 19, then was revised to 820 and has ballooned to over 1,000. On the radio on Friday Mayor de Blasio made attempts to deflect the blame, insisting that the city hadn’t violated the CDC’s instructions, rather they hadn’t adhered to its guidance.

The Leave Behind Naloxone Program will leave a drug overdose kit with overdose survivors. Friends and family of survivors can also request a kit. Naloxone is used to block the effects of opioids in an overdose.

It’s been ten years since Coney Island’s Astroland closed. The Coney Island History Project is celebrating the lost amusement park throughout this month.

What is going on with The Michelle Obama Political Club that is in no way affiliated with Michelle Obama and why did this oddly named and seemingly newly formed group endorse State Senator Jesse Hamilton against Zellnor Myrie?

After declaring he would stop balancing the Sisyphus Stones, Uliks Gryka has stated he will return to Fort Washington Park to balance the stones after the stones were vandalized.

Melissa and Michelle Jones have become the NYPD’s first ever black twin-sister detectives.

Here it is, the dumbest opinion about bike lanes in history.

Juliio C. Ayala, an 18-year-old believed to be affiliated with MS-13, was arraigned on Sunday that he raped an 11-year-old girl in Brooklyn.

At 8.4%, Queens had the highest year-over-year rent hike in the country in August.

Another account of the Central Park West ghost bus, which the MTA says does not exist… but it does.

The man who sprayed a mystery substance on NYC buses was 46-year-old Andre Chandler and the mystery substance was bear repellant (twice as strong as pepper-spray). He faces 20 counts of assault and as far as we know there were no bears aboard those buses.

Please stop feeding the squirrels in Madison Square Park!


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The Briefly for August 31, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, J’Ouvert, Electric Scooters, and More

The weekend’s subway changes (the L train is running), the Brooklyn-Queens streetcar project is a long way from starting, “Jewtropolis” in maps, moving Central Park’s horse carriages away from cars, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Everything you need to know about subway changes this weekend and Monday.

The official information on J’Ouvert on Monday. Get a preview of someone of the elaborate preparations.

Gothamist looked at all the New York State Senate campaign websites so you don’t have to.

Meet the rebellious women of NYC in the 1800s.

For a few hours in Uber, the Weather Channel, Snapchat, and others, New York City’s name was changed to Jewtropolis. Whoops.

Dockless electric scooters from Bird have made their debut in the city with the first program taking place in Bed Stuy.

The Mayor’s lack of response to the hit and run that a killed four-year-old in Bushwick compared to everything that he has publicly done in response to the crash the killed a one and four-year-old in Park Slope tells the tale of two Brooklyns.

Some questions for the Governor after his debate against Cynthia Nixon.

The Department of Transportation proposed moving horse carriage pickups in Central Park to five spots within the park to decrease the amount of time they spend alongside cars.

The history of Brooklyn’s Caribbean carnival.

An evening in Washington Heights is documented with a photo essay by The Village Voice.

The plan for the BQX streetcar has been revised. The new plan would connect Astoria on one end to Red Hook and Gowanus on the other end has gotten smaller in scope (stops in Sunset Park were completely removed), will be more expensive ($1.3 billion more) and take longer (won’t be completed until 2029) than the original proposal in 2016.

Today’s NYC Ferry won’t make the trip, but one September day in 1910 and again in August 1911, Rose Pitonof swam the 17 miles from E 23rd St down to Steeplechase Pier in Coney Island.


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